Tag: gerrymandering

North Carolina judges throw out congressional map ahead of 2020 elections

A panel of three North Carolina judges on Monday granted a temporary injunction that blocks the state’s current congressional map from being used in the 2020 elections, ruling that voters had a “substantial likelihood” of winning a lawsuit that contended Republicans had drawn districts with “partisan intent.” The injunction was granted because the judges — Paul […]

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A Dead Man’s Hard Drive Is the ‘Most Perfect’ Example of White Supremacy in Our Lifetime

Screenshot: C-SPAN via YouTube “More perfect.” That phrase from the U.S. Constitution doesn’t just encapsulate the Founding Fathers’ goal for this ever-evolving union we now call “America.” Aside from Billy Porter’s awards show wardrobe, “more perfect” also describes the 400 years of structural bigotry on this stolen soil. Advertisement While many people consider “white supremacy” […]

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The Grassroots Battle to Save Democracy

In the wake of another mass shooting at the hands of another AR-15-armed gunman and a powerful hurricane heralding the beginning of a dangerous storm season, the policy conversation in the Democratic presidential primary has been dominated in recent days by gun control and climate change. Both issues have been the subject of expansive policy […]

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Republican Domination of North Carolina Was Just Dealt a Major Blow

A court in North Carolina ruled unanimously on Tuesday that the state’s partisan gerrymander, which kept Republicans in power in the state legislature even as Democrats won popular votes statewide, is illegal. “Voters are not freely choosing their representatives,” a bipartisan panel of three judges wrote in their decision. “Rather, representatives are choosing their voters.” […]

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How Prisons Inflate Rural Voters’ Power

The Trump administration suffered its worst legal defeat yet last month when the Supreme Court effectively forced it to keep a citizenship question off the 2020 census. Had the effort succeeded, fewer immigrants and noncitizens would have participated in the census, thereby warping a decade’s worth of federal statistics and congressional districts. More than 200,000 […]

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After 48 Years, Democrats Still Haven’t Gotten the Memo

In 1971, soon-to-be Supreme Court Justice Lewis F. Powell Jr. wrote a memo to Eugene Sydnor Jr., the education director at the United States Chamber of Commerce. Powell told Sydnor and the Chamber that if the capitalist class wanted to be taken seriously in the halls of power, it would have to engage in a […]

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Mississippi Quotes John Roberts to Defend Its Racist Election Law

Virtually every state in the Union elects its governor and other statewide offices by popular vote. Mississippi does something different. First, a candidate must win a majority of the statewide popular vote. Second, they must also win a plurality of the vote in a majority of Mississippi House of Representatives districts. If a candidate does […]

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Make the Guarantee Clause Great Again

The Supreme Court’s 5-4 ruling in Rucho v. Common Cause last month dealt a harsh blow to American democracy. For the last decade, federal courts were the strongest bulwark against partisan gerrymandering in the states, but Chief Justice John Roberts closed the door on that remedy in the future. In his opinion, though, he accidentally […]

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To Beat the Gerrymander, Think Outside the Lines

Voters in North Carolina, Ohio, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Maryland deserve fair maps that don’t lock in a partisan advantage for either Republicans or Democrats. Federal courts nationwide had recently begun to insist on that, repeatedly declaring districts tainted with extreme partisan intent unconstitutional. The Supreme Court put an end to that dream last week. Its […]

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Restoring Democracy is Not Open to Debate

Hours before Thursday’s Democratic presidential debate, the Supreme Court issued two rulings that could greatly affect our democracy. One decision failed to stop the drive toward increasingly partisan gerrymanders, and the other temporarily blocked the Trump Administration’s attempt to leverage the decennial United States Census for partisan advantage. Despite this timely news peg, the debate moderators failed to […]

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The Supreme Court Steps to the Right

Last week, the Supreme Court wrapped up a full term without Anthony Kennedy for the first time in thirty years. Liberals can sum up the experience in five words: It could have been worse. Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation last October marked an ideological turning point for the court, one that will reshape American lives for […]

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A Partisan Supreme Court Upholds Partisan Power

To say that the Supreme Court’s ruling in Rucho v. Common Cause is bad for American democracy would be an understatement. In a 5-4 decision along the usual ideological lines, the justices held that federal courts have no power to remedy partisan gerrymandering. The ruling gives a green light to state lawmakers across the country […]

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It’s Almost Decision Time for the US Supreme Court, With Questions Regarding Census 2020 and Gerrymandering High on the List

The nine justices of the U.S. Supreme CourtPhoto: Chip Somodevilla (Getty) With the start of each June, the countdown begins to when the Supreme Court is expected to hand down decisions in cases that came before them in the term, and among the biggest items this term were cases involving census 2020 and partisan gerrymandering. […]

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Republicans Plan to Rig Elections for a Decade

Let’s just get this out of the way right up top: Republicans like white people. The Anglo-Saxon kind, anyway. They like them better than people of color; they like them better than people who might self-identify as white themselves, but are considered in the United States to be “other.” People of Latinx decent, for instance, […]

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Democracy Fights Back

Florida Republicans recently adopted a poll tax to preserve a Jim Crow statute. That such a statement should be written to describe current events—not merely actions condemned to the dustbin of history—is harrowing but, sadly, far from surprising. The year is 2019, not 1950, but the fight over who can participate in our democracy is […]

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