Tag: Foreign Affairs

The Unintended Consequences of Trump’s Trade War

The Trump administration’s year-long quest to reform China’s economic policy has seemed motivated by an America First mentality. “Tariffs are working far better than anyone ever anticipated,” the president tweeted last August. “China market has dropped 27% in last 4 months, and they are talking to us. Our market is stronger than ever, and will […]

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What’s Really Behind Greece’s Demand for World War Two Reparations?

In April, Greece’s parliament voted to try to claim reparations from Germany for World War One and World War Two. This is not the first time Greece has explored the idea, which became popular during the financial crisis. From 2012 onwards, Greek prime ministers have appointed panels and committees to investigate a potential legal case […]

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The Venezuela Coup’s Risky Dependence on Foreign Opinion

The Hawthorne effect refers to the tendency of individuals to behave differently when they know they’re being observed. It’s on prominent display right now in Venezuela. On April 30, National Assembly speaker Juan Guaidó, after months of quixotic agitation involving travel and interviews, took to the streets with a smattering of armed soldiers to demand […]

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Brexit Could Be Turning the Tide for Scottish Independence

Meet the other group of secession-minded nationalists in Britain: A few hundred miles north of where the details of Brexit continue to be debated, members of the Scottish National Party met in Edinburgh this weekend for their spring conference. There was one topic on everyone’s minds: independence. And by the end of the conference, it […]

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How the U.S. Became a Haven for War Criminals

Isaac was 12 when he was taken. He and his 18-year-old sister Marie had been living in the Liberian bush for about a month, having left Kakata, a town just beyond the perimeter of the U.S.-owned Firestone rubber plantation, when Charles Taylor’s forces launched an attack on the nearby city of Monrovia in October 1992. […]

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What Green Parties Everywhere Can Learn From a Rare Victory in Canada

After a campaign marked by extremes, Scottish-born dentist-turned-politician Peter Bevan-Baker listened to the first returns of Prince Edward Island’s (PEI) provincial election at home. Polls suggested that the Greens might form a majority government, making him Premier of Canada’s smallest province, an island with about 153,000 residents in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. One poll […]

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The Foolhardy Quest to Define a “Trump Doctrine”

Michael Anton is nothing if not resolute. A former Bush speechwriter and private-equity executive, he has dedicated himself these past few years to a lonely and self-evidently futile goal: to convince America that President Donald Trump is a statesman with a coherent philosophy—or really anything other than an erratic, egomaniacal ethno-nationalist. Anton first rocketed into […]

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What’s the Best Way to Keep Incendiary, Violent Content Offline?

In early April, in the anxious days of mourning after the massacres at two New Zealand mosques, the Australian government passed what it called the Sharing of Abhorrent Violent Material bill. The hastily drafted law called for fines of up to 10 percent of annual revenue or three years of jail time for technology executives […]

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Add Trump’s Yemen Veto to Obama’s Legacy

Donald Trump loves to present himself as the anti-Obama. But this week, when he handily vetoed a congressional resolution directing him to end U.S. military support for the Saudi-led coalition war in Yemen, he leaned heavily upon his predecessor’s policies—an inconvenient fact for both presidents’ supporters. For the past four years, a coalition of 10 […]

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Add Trump’s Yemen Veto to Obama’s Spotty War Legacy

Donald Trump loves to present himself as the anti-Obama. But this week, when he handily vetoed a congressional resolution directing him to end U.S. military support for the Saudi-led coalition war in Yemen, he leaned heavily upon his predecessor’s policies—an inconvenient fact for both presidents’ supporters. For the past four years, a coalition of 10 […]

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The Oligarch Battle Behind Ukraine’s Presidential Election

If Ihor Kolomoisky wants to buy Ukraine’s presidency, as his critics allege, can you really blame him? A lifelong “raider,” as he calls those skilled at exploiting opportunity, Kolomoisky in his youth ferried electronics from Moscow to Ukraine during the collapse of the Soviet Union—a train line once graced by robbers in leather jackets who […]

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The Labour Party’s Role in the Brexit Crisis

Three years after the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union and two weeks after it was supposed to have left, Prime Minister Theresa May returned to Europe this week, hat in hand, to ask for a second, last-minute extension. Hanging in the balance were Britain’s access to certain food and medicine, the stability […]

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Why Narendra Modi’s Plan to “Clean” Up India Hasn’t Worked

Over the next six weeks, Indian voters will choose their leaders in the world’s largest-ever election. Whether citizens will opt for the ruling right-wing Bharatiya Janata Party of Prime Minister Narendra Modi or the more secular Congress Party of Rahul Gandhi remains to be seen. Where most citizens will defecate before they vote is, unfortunately, […]

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Why Narenda Modi’s Plan to “Clean” Up India Hasn’t Worked

Over the next six weeks, Indian voters will choose their leaders in the world’s largest-ever election. Whether citizens will opt for the ruling right-wing Bharatiya Janata Party of Prime Minister Narenda Modi or the more secular Congress party of Rahul Gandhi remains to be seen. Where most citizens will defecate before they vote is, unfortunately, […]

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The Growing Obsession With Linking Iran to Terrorism

On Monday, President Trump designated the Iranian Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), a branch of Iran’s armed forces, as a “terrorist organization.” CIA and Pentagon officials told The New York Times the decision would threaten U.S. military personnel in the region. Iraqi observers told Al-Monitor’s Laura Rozen the designation might alienate Iraq, where Iran has […]

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