Tag: Blacks

Denying Racism Supports It

When did we arrive at the point where applying the words racist and racism were more radioactive than actually doing and saying racist things and demonstrating oneself to be a racist? How is it that America insists on knowledge of the unknowable — what lurks in the heart — in order to assign the appellation? […]

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The Almost Moon Man

Listen and subscribe to our podcast from your mobile device: Via Apple Podcasts | Via RadioPublic | Via Stitcher There are two stories from the 1960s that America likes to tell about itself — the civil rights movement and the space race. We look at the brief moment when the two collided. [For an exclusive […]

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Mellody Hobson of Ariel Investments: ‘Capitalism Needs to Work for Everyone’

Mellody Hobson was raised by a single mother and endured economic hardship as a child. The phone was shut off. The car was repossessed. Her family was evicted. Today, Ms. Hobson is one of the most senior black women in finance. She serves on the boards of JPMorgan Chase and Starbucks, and this month was […]

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The Joy of Hatred

The chanting was disturbing and the anger was frightening, but what I noticed most about the president’s rally in Greenville, N.C., on Wednesday night was the pleasure of the crowd. His voters and supporters were having fun. The “Send her back” chant directed at Representative Ilhan Omar of Minnesota was hateful but also exuberant, an […]

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16,000 Readers Shared Their Experiences of Being Told to ‘Go Back.’ Here Are Some of Their Stories.

July 19, 2019 “Go back to where you came from.” These seven words are seared into the minds of countless Americans — a reminder that they haven’t always been welcome in the country where they were born or naturalized because of their appearance, language or religion. For many, the pain of past encounters throbbed again […]

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Pete Buttigieg Is Still Figuring This Out

It was a humid Sunday in June, a quiet afternoon that Pete Buttigieg knew would not remain quiet. “You know, there are always going to be ups and downs,” the 37-year-old mayor of South Bend, Ind., told me as he puttered through the kitchen of the century-old Victorian home he shares with his husband of […]

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The Myth That Busing Failed

Listen and subscribe to our podcast from your mobile device: Via Apple Podcasts | Via RadioPublic | Via Stitcher The first Democratic debate brought renewed attention to busing as a tool of school desegregation. We spoke to a colleague about what the conversation has been missing. [For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories […]

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Pumpsie Green, First Black Player for Boston Red Sox, Dies at 85

On July 21, 1959, Pumpsie Green made his major league debut as an eighth-inning pinch-runner with the Boston Red Sox, then played at shortstop to finish the game against the Chicago White Sox at Comiskey Park. Green’s appearance was merely a blip in the box score, but his presence in a Red Sox uniform represented […]

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Racist to the Bone

After instructing four women of color in the House of Representatives to “go back” where they came from, President Trump now claims, “I don’t have a Racist bone in my body!” That appears incorrect. I have identified the following racist bones in Trump’s body: Phalanges and metacarpals: These are bones of the fingers and hands […]

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Johnny Clegg, South African Singer Who Battled Apartheid With Music, Is Dead at 66

Johnny Clegg, a British-born South African singer, songwriter and guitarist whose fusion of Western and African influences found an international audience and stood as an emblem of resistance to the apartheid authorities in his adopted land, died on Tuesday in Johannesburg. He was 66. His manager, Roddy Quin, announced the death. Mr. Clegg learned in […]

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Democratic Hopeful Marianne Williamson Asked White Audience Members to Apologize to Black Guests for Slavery

Rev. Jesse Jackson speaks with Democratic presidential candidate and self-help author Marianne Williamson at the Rainbow PUSH Coalition Annual International Convention on July 1, 2019, in Chicago.Photo: Scott Olson (Getty Images) I don’t know if 2020 Democratic presidential hopeful Marianne Williamson believes that she can win, but she’s certainly entertaining in her losing effort. To […]

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Where Segregation Persists, Trouble Persists

The revival of the argument over school busing illuminates a continuing predicament for Democrats and proponents of racial equality. Integration works, but how do we get it to fly in the face of white intransigence? There is a large body of evidence that shows that African-American children perform better when they move out of high-poverty […]

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A Decision in the Eric Garner Case

Listen and subscribe to our podcast from your mobile device: Via Apple Podcasts | Via RadioPublic | Via Stitcher One day before the fifth anniversary of Eric Garner’s death at the hands of police officers in New York, the Justice Department said it would not bring federal civil rights charges against an officer involved. We […]

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How the Eric Garner Decision Compares With Other Cases

After the fatal chokehold of Eric Garner by a New York City police officer, a familiar pattern unfolded: Expressions of outrage, promises to investigate, a long wait for a resolution. On Tuesday, just before the fifth anniversary of Mr. Garner’s death, word came that federal prosecutors would not seek civil rights charges against Daniel Pantaleo, […]

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‘The D.O.J. Has Failed Us’: Eric Garner’s Family Assails Prosecutors

Elected officials, civil rights activists and family members expressed dismay on Tuesday that the Justice Department had declined to pursue charges against a New York City police officer in the death of Eric Garner on a Staten Island sidewalk five years ago. In an emotional news conference, family members called on Mayor Bill de Blasio […]

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What the City Didn’t Want the Public to Know: Its Policy Deepens Segregation

For more than two years, lawyers for New York City have fought to keep secret a report on the city’s affordable housing lotteries, arguing that its release would insert an unfavorable and “potentially incorrect analysis into the public conversation.” The report was finally released on Monday, following a federal court ruling, and its findings were […]

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Ebony Memories: A Photo Treasury

[Race affects our lives in countless ways. To read provocative stories on race from The Times, sign up here for our weekly Race/Related newsletter.] CHICAGO — For months, a stream of visitors — curious, cultured and deep-pocketed — have slipped into a drab brick warehouse on the West Side of Chicago. They have been escorted […]

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The Painful Roots of Trump’s ‘Go Back’ Comment

WASHINGTON — Shelley Jackson was 7 years old the first time she heard it. In the early 1970s, Ms. Jackson was among a group of 40 black children who were bused from one side of Los Angeles to integrate a majority-white school across town. One day, a playground squabble ended in a white classmate telling […]

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