Tag: your-feed-science

Yes, Omicron Is Loosening Its Hold. But the Pandemic Has Not Ended.

After a frenetic few weeks when the Omicron variant of the coronavirus seemed to infect everyone, including the vaccinated and boosted, the United States is finally seeing encouraging signs. As cases decline in some parts of the country, many have begun to hope that this surge is the last big battle with the virus — […]

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Frogs Without Legs Regrow Leglike Limbs in New Experiment

To spur regrowth in a creature that does not naturally regenerate, such as an adult frog or human, researchers have experimented with stem cell implants or gene therapy. But these methods can be extremely complicated to implement, Dr. Murugan said. An easier approach, Dr. Levin suggested, is to trigger the animal’s own body and cells […]

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‘In the End, You’re Treated Like a Spy,’ Says M.I.T. Scientist

“Most of us, when we looked at the government accusation, we said, ‘Wow, he did that?’” he said. “You see, you tend to believe in government.” But he, too, was under investigation. That same month, Dr. Chen was detained for two or three hours at Logan International Airport as he returned from a trip to […]

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How Omicron’s Mutations Allow It To Thrive

As nurses and doctors struggle with a record-breaking wave of Omicron cases, evolutionary biologists are engaged in a struggle of their own: figuring out how this world-dominating variant came to be. When the Omicron variant took off in southern Africa in November, scientists were taken aback by its genetic makeup. Whereas earlier variants had differed […]

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Social Security Opens to Survivors of Same-Sex Couples Who Could Not Marry

Starting at age 60 — or 50 for those who are disabled — a survivor can either apply for a deceased spouse’s Social Security benefits (if these are higher than the survivor’s, or if the survivor does not have the work history to qualify) or apply for them temporarily and delay claiming their own (allowing […]

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This Ancient Crab Had Unusually Huge Eyes

To figure out how Callichimaera used its eyes, Ms. Jenkins and Dr. Luque used the abundance of available Callichimaera specimens to put together a growth sequence. They compared this with 14 living species from across the crab family tree. They were surprised to find that — unlike other crab species — Callichimaera retained its large […]

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As Omicron Crests, Booster Shots Are Keeping Americans Out of Hospitals

Booster shots of the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines are not just reducing the number of infections with the contagious Omicron variant, they’re also keeping infected Americans out of hospitals, according to data published on Friday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The extra doses are 90 percent effective at preventing hospitalization with the […]

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Japan’s Monkey Queen Faces Challenge to Her Reign: Mating Season

After Yakei’s altercation with Nanchu, reserve workers performed what is known as a “peanut test”: providing the monkeys with peanuts and seeing who eats first. Males and females stepped aside to let Yakei eat first, a confirmation of her alpha status. Since then, “Yakei has shown some behaviors typically seen only in dominant males, such […]

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Why Whales Don’t Choke

To capture prey, humpbacks, minkes and other whales use a tactic called lunge feeding. They accelerate — their mouths open to nearly 90 degrees — and engulf a volume of water large enough to fill their entire bodies. “It’s crazy. Imagine putting an entire human inside your mouth,” said Kelsey Gil, a zoologist studying whale […]

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A New Map of the Sun’s Local Bubble

Just a bit too late for New Year celebrations, astronomers have discovered that the Milky Way galaxy, our home, is, like champagne, full of bubbles. As it happens, our solar system is passing through the center of one of these bubbles. Fourteen million years ago, according to the astronomers, a firecracker chain of supernova explosions […]

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Can Omicron Cause Long Covid?

It found that people who had received even one dose of a Covid vaccine before their infection were seven to 10 times less likely to report two or more symptoms of long Covid 12 to 20 weeks later. The study, which was led by Michael Simon, Arcadia’s director of data science, and Dr. Richard Parker, […]

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In Sewage, Clues to Omicron’s Surge

Dr. Hopkins consults weekly with wastewater screeners to determine where the city should funnel resources. When officials from the Houston program noticed that the sewage in one ZIP code, a largely Hispanic neighborhood, had unusually high levels of the virus week after week, they distributed testing and cleaning supplies and multilingual educational materials about the […]

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