Tag: United States

Sorry former Pentagon expert, but China is nowhere near winning the AI race

Nicolas Chaillan, the Pentagon’s former Chief Software Officer, is on a whirlwind press tour to drum up as much fervor for his radical assertion that the US has already lost the AI race against China. Speaking to the Financial Times in his first interview after leaving his post at the Pentagon, Chaillan said: We have […]

Read More

What to Know About Boosters if You Got the Johnson & Johnson Vaccine

The company also announced results from another real-world study, conducted in the United States, last month. The study, which has not yet been reviewed by experts, found that the vaccine’s effectiveness remained stable at 79 percent through July, suggesting that it continued to provide good protection against Delta. It was 81 percent effective at preventing […]

Read More

Concert Halls Are Back. But Visa Backlogs Are Keeping Musicians Out.

When the Seattle Symphony finally performed before a full audience last month for the first time in a year and half, something was missing: its music director, the Danish conductor Thomas Dausgaard, who could not get a visa to travel to the United States. The New York Philharmonic had to find a last-minute substitute this […]

Read More

The Great Supply Chain Disruption

The Daily is made by Lisa Tobin, Rachel Quester, Lynsea Garrison, Annie Brown, Clare Toeniskoetter, Paige Cowett, Michael Simon Johnson, Brad Fisher, Larissa Anderson, Wendy Dorr, Chris Wood, Jessica Cheung, Stella Tan, Alexandra Leigh Young, Lisa Chow, Eric Krupke, Marc Georges, Luke Vander Ploeg, M.J. Davis Lin, Austin Mitchell, Neena Pathak, Dan Powell, Dave Shaw, […]

Read More

The Unvaccinated May Not Be Who You Think

We know from research into human behavior but also just common sense that in such situations, face-saving can be crucial. In fact, that’s exactly why the mandates may be working so well. If all the unvaccinated truly believed that vaccines were that dangerous, more of them would have quit. These mandates may be making it […]

Read More

Why More American Workers Are Quitting

All happy economies are alike; each unhappy economy is unhappy in its own way. In the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis, the economy’s problems were all about inadequate demand. The housing boom had gone bust; consumers weren’t spending enough to fill the gap; the Obama stimulus, designed to boost demand, was too small and […]

Read More

What America’s History of Immigration Means to Me

A nation is a community of people that, at best, is held together by a common story. When I was a kid, I was told a certain triumphalist story about America, which was loaded with words like “superpower” and “greatest.” That triumphalist story sounds tinny in 2021, and it seems to have been rejected by […]

Read More

U.S. Regains Seat at U.N. Human Rights Council, 3 Years After Quitting

The United States on Thursday regained a seat on the United Nations Human Rights Council, which the Trump administration abandoned in 2018 because of what it called the body’s hypocrisy and anti-Israel prejudice. In seeking to rejoin the 47-member council, the Biden administration, which has taken a far more supportive stance toward the United Nations […]

Read More

Where Biden Is Most Vulnerable

There are political and civic virtues aplenty in centrism, including its pushback against extreme partisanship and its promise of a less vicious and perpetual seesaw. But there’s also literary virtue in Ryan Cooper’s description, in The Week, of a certain vague, noncommittal type of it, which he locates in Kyrsten Sinema: “This is political ‘centrism’ […]

Read More

Australia Is Still a ‘Free’ Country, Despite Our Covid Lockdowns

These anti-lockdown protests, never attended by more than a few thousand people, are small by Australian standards. And unlike Americans, Australians are not politically inclined to demands for liberty and choice as much as we are for fairness and solidarity. (The name of the national anthem is “Advance Australia Fair.”) As Australia’s First Nations people […]

Read More

Why American Industrial Policy Should Be Global

Globalization may have lifted hundreds of millions of people out of poverty, but to its critics, it has long been a dirty word. They associate it with enhancing corporate power, reducing the wages of workers and deepening divides between the wealthy and everyone else. During the pandemic, globalization has also been blamed for putting the […]

Read More

Border With Canada to Open, Businesses ‘Could Not Be Happier’

Nick Pitillo, a local restaurateur and lifelong resident, said that business was better during Columbus Day weekend, particularly compared with the dark days of 2020, but was still off about 15 percent. “We had a great week, but you could definitely feel their absence,” he said, adding that Ellicottville had also seen many Canadians sell […]

Read More

What if You Had Abortion Pills in Your Medicine Cabinet?

Access to mifepristone, one of the drugs taken for a medication abortion, has been politically fraught since the drug was approved more than 20 years ago. Mifepristone is regulated under what’s called a risk evaluation and mitigation strategy, or REMS — a designation generally reserved for drugs that carry a high risk to patient safety. […]

Read More

Why the Tuskegee Study Slowed Vaccinations of Black Americans

TUSKEGEE, Ala. — By the time vaccines for the coronavirus were introduced late last year, the pandemic had taken two of Lucenia Williams Dunn’s close friends. Still, Ms. Dunn, the former mayor of Tuskegee, contemplated for months whether to be inoculated. It was a complicated consideration, framed by the government’s botched response to the pandemic, […]

Read More

Mary McLeod Bethune Statue Unveiled in Florida Before a Permanent Stay in the U.S. Capitol

Mary McLeod Bethune Statue Unveiled in Florida The towering marble sculpture is currently in the News-Journal Center, where Daytona Beach residents got to see it in a public exhibit for the first time on Tuesday, WESH reports. The artwork was made possible through lengthy government approval processes and so far $740,000 out of a $850,000 […]

Read More

Amid U.S.-China Chill, Harvard Moves a Top Language Program to Taiwan

TAIPEI, Taiwan — Harvard University will move a popular Chinese-language program to Taipei from Beijing amid a broad chill in academic and cultural exchanges between the United States and China. The program’s director, Jennifer L. Liu, told The Harvard Crimson that the move had been driven by a perceived lack of friendliness on the part […]

Read More

Washington Should Quit Its Budget Gimmicks

Americans of a certain age may remember J. Wellington Wimpy, a droll character from Popeye cartoons. “I’ll gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today,” Wimpy would periodically implore passers-by. That pretty much summarizes the opaque budget math behind the two huge spending plans now before Congress, one aimed at fixing our physical infrastructure and […]

Read More

Covid Has Killed Hundreds of Police Officers. Many Still Resist Vaccines.

In San Jose, Calif., city leaders decided just as a vaccine mandate was taking effect to allow unvaccinated officers to remain employed through the end of the year, with incremental discipline and testing requirements. Mayor Sam Liccardo of San Jose said he wanted to keep as many police officers as possible on the job, but […]

Read More

On Masks and Covid, I Finally Found Common Ground. In Germany.

And this tendency was reflected in the response to the coronavirus: The difference between the share of Germans on the ideological right and left who thought there should have been fewer restrictions on public activity was 20 percentage points, a Pew survey found early this summer. In the United States, the difference between right and […]

Read More

Which Towns Are Worth Saving?

The Daily is made by Lisa Tobin, Rachel Quester, Lynsea Garrison, Annie Brown, Clare Toeniskoetter, Paige Cowett, Michael Simon Johnson, Brad Fisher, Larissa Anderson, Wendy Dorr, Chris Wood, Jessica Cheung, Stella Tan, Alexandra Leigh Young, Lisa Chow, Eric Krupke, Marc Georges, Luke Vander Ploeg, M.J. Davis Lin, Austin Mitchell, Neena Pathak, Dan Powell, Dave Shaw, […]

Read More

Halting Extinction Is an Issue We Actually Agree On

NASHVILLE — If you’re a certain age, you may remember the snail darter, a small fish in the Little Tennessee River that caused an environmental firestorm when it was listed as endangered in 1975. At the time, the Tennessee Valley Authority was already in the midst of building a dam on the Little Tennessee. Snail […]

Read More

The Supreme Court v. Reality

WASHINGTON — Ordinarily staid and silent Supreme Court justices have become whirling dervishes of late, spinning madly to rebut the idea that Americans are beginning to regard the court as a dangerous cabal of partisan hacks. They need not fret and wring their hands. No one is beginning to think that. Many of us have […]

Read More

Two Authors View America From Above and Below, and Are Not Happy With What They See

In “The Raging 2020s,” Alec Ross similarly argues that our social contract is broken, that the roles of business, labor, government and foreign countries need to be rethought, and he supplies several of his favorite templates. Osnos’s view is from the ground, Ross’s view, that of the policy wonk, is from above, not the view […]

Read More

U.S. Soccer’s Top Women’s League Faces Down Abusers, Uncertainty

In the top professional soccer league for women in North America, everyone understood that the power primarily rested with men: the team owners, executives and coaches who controlled the athletes and their careers. While the National Women’s Soccer League is home to celebrities like Megan Rapinoe and Alex Morgan from the World Cup-winning U.S. national […]

Read More

A Troubling C.I.A. Admission

Julian E. Barnes contributed reporting. The Daily is made by Lisa Tobin, Rachel Quester, Lynsea Garrison, Annie Brown, Clare Toeniskoetter, Paige Cowett, Michael Simon Johnson, Brad Fisher, Larissa Anderson, Wendy Dorr, Chris Wood, Jessica Cheung, Stella Tan, Alexandra Leigh Young, Lisa Chow, Eric Krupke, Marc Georges, Luke Vander Ploeg, M.J. Davis Lin, Austin Mitchell, Neena […]

Read More

The Pandora Papers and the Power of Shame

Yet we do see forms of accountability being imposed that are effective despite being outside the realm of the law. As my own and other recent research on high-net-worth individuals has shown, reputational costs weigh more heavily on them than the threat of fines or prosecution. The laws are no match for the legal armory […]

Read More

Texas’ Toxic Heart

But when she pointed to a subtle churn of the lawn in various spots and said that I had moles? That threw me. And that’s when I finally accepted that I hadn’t bought a house. I’d bought a zoo. I moved to my forested neighborhood in Chapel Hill, N.C., in mid-July, and in my first […]

Read More

The State of the Pandemic

Apoorva Mandavilli contributed reporting. The Daily is made by Lisa Tobin, Rachel Quester, Lynsea Garrison, Annie Brown, Clare Toeniskoetter, Paige Cowett, Michael Simon Johnson, Brad Fisher, Larissa Anderson, Wendy Dorr, Chris Wood, Jessica Cheung, Stella Tan, Alexandra Leigh Young, Lisa Chow, Eric Krupke, Marc Georges, Luke Vander Ploeg, M.J. Davis Lin, Austin Mitchell, Neena Pathak, […]

Read More

Biden Can End Debt-Ceiling Sabotage Once and for All

See a pattern? In each case, there was a Democrat in the White House. Republicans haven’t been the only party to engage in political gamesmanship on the issue. As Mr. McConnell reminded Mr. Biden in a recent letter, Democrats (including then-Senator Biden) under President George W. Bush opposed raising the debt limit. But Democrats always […]

Read More