Tag: students

Meet the Oystamaran

When Michelle Kornberg was about to graduate from MIT, she wanted to use her knowledge of mechanical and ocean engineering to make the world a better place. Luckily, she found the perfect senior capstone class project: supporting sustainable seafood by helping aquaculture farmers grow oysters. “It’s our responsibility to use our skills and opportunities to […]

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Making her way through MIT

Lucy Du, a doctoral student in the MIT Media Lab, has a remarkable passion for making. She spends her work day in lab designing and fabricating prosthetics, and devotes her free time to personal projects in the MIT MakerWorkshop or inspiring other students to try their hands at engineering. “The best feeling is when I […]

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Six MIT students named 2023 Schwarzman Scholars

Five MIT seniors — Sihao Huang, William Kuhl, Giramnah Peña-Alcántara, Sreya Vangara, and Kelly Wu — and graduate student Tingyu Li have been awarded 2022-23 Schwarzman Scholarships. They will head to Tsinghua University in Beijing next August to pursue a one-year master’s degree in global affairs. The students will also receive leadership training, career development, […]

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The intersection of math, computers, and everything else

Shardul Chiplunkar, a senior in Course 18C (mathematics with computer science), entered MIT interested in computers, but soon he was trying everything from spinning fire to building firewalls. He dabbled in audio engineering and glass blowing, was a tenor for the MIT/Wellesley Toons a capella group, and learned to sail. “When I was entering MIT, […]

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3 Questions: Tolga Durak on building a safety culture at MIT

Environment, Health, and Safety Managing Director Tolga Durak heads a team working to build a strong safety culture at the Institute and to implement systems that lead to successful lab and makerspace operations. EHS is also pursuing new opportunities in the areas of safe and sustainable labs and applied makerspace research.  Durak holds a BS […]

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Energy hackers give a glimpse of the postpandemic future

After going virtual in 2020, the MIT EnergyHack was back on campus last weekend in a brand-new hybrid format that saw teams participate both in person and virtually from across the globe. While the hybrid format presented new challenges to the organizing team, it also allowed for one of the most diverse and inspiring iterations […]

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Featured video: A musical encore for a re-imagined library

Play video When MIT’s Hayden Library was originally dedicated in 1950, Czech-born composer Bohuslav Martinů was commissioned to write his “Piano Trio in D Minor” to mark the occasion. The piece received its world premiere in a performance by MIT professors Klaus Liepmann on violin and Gregory Tucker on piano, and George Finckel of Bennington […]

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Here Are the Books Parents Want to Ban in Schools Now

Parents are fervently advocating for schoolchildren to read less about race, gender, and sexuality by trying to force certain books out of student libraries altogether—the latest salvo in America’s culture war for young minds. “Forget Tide Pods and cinnamon swallowing,” the American Library Association wrote in a post on its “Intellectual Freedom Blog” last month. […]

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Adedolapo Adedokun named 2023 Mitchell Scholar

MIT senior Adedolapo “Dolapo” Adedokun has been named one of 12 winners of the George J. Mitchell Scholarship’s Class of 2023. After completing his degree in electrical engineering and computer science next spring, he will travel to Ireland to undertake a MSc in intelligent systems at Trinity College Dublin as MIT’s fourth student to receive […]

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Investigating pathogens and their life cycles, for the benefit of society

Desmond Edwards was a little kid when first learned about typhoid fever. Fortunately, he didn’t have the disease. He was looking at a cartoon public health announcement. The cartoon, produced by the Pan American Health Organization, was designed to educate people in his home country of Jamaica about the importance of immunizations for diseases like […]

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3 Questions: Supporting graduate student families

When you have a family, life becomes a balancing act of supporting your loved ones while managing your personal responsibilities. At MIT, three offices play a pivotal role in supporting graduate students with families — their partners, their children — as they create that balance.  Naomi Carton serves as associate dean for graduate residential education […]

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3 Questions: Sophie Gibert on ethics in action

Sophie Gibert is a PhD candidate in philosophy and assistant director of 24.133 (Experiential Ethics), an MIT class in which students explore ethical questions related to their internships, research, or other experiential learning activities. Gibert, who also serves as a graduate teaching fellow for Embedded EthiCS at Harvard University, which focuses on ethics for computer […]

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Carina Letong Hong named a 2022 Rhodes Scholar for China

Carina Letong Hong from Guangzhou, China, is a winner of the Rhodes Scholarship (China Constituency). As a Rhodes Scholar, she will pursue graduate studies in mathematics at Oxford University. At MIT, Hong is a junior double-majoring in mathematics and physics. She hopes to become an academic and devote her life to solving conjectures and building […]

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The poetry of physics

“With skin brushed then tangled, with the apple touched at the supermarket then tangled,with the tear wiped then woven away,tangled with even things very distant like Mars dust,that unravel themselves when /touched by our gaze…”  —Excerpt from Miriam Manglani’s poem “Makinde’s Quantum World,” about Makinde Ogunnaike’s quantum physics research Senior MIT physics doctoral student Olumakinde […]

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Managing Covid-19 at MIT this fall: “So far, so good”

Despite the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, nearly 20,000 people are now studying, working, or living at MIT on any given day. Thanks to a robust plan to mitigate the spread of Covid-19 on campus — masking, attesting, testing, and access control — the number of positive Covid-19 cases has remained very low (at or below 0.1% […]

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MIT makes strides on climate action plan

Two recent online events related to MIT’s ambitious new climate action plan highlighted several areas of progress, including uses of the campus as a real-life testbed for climate impact research, the creation of new planning bodies with opportunities for input from all parts of the MIT community, and a variety of moves toward reducing the […]

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Radio-frequency wave scattering improves fusion simulations

In the quest for fusion energy, understanding how radio-frequency (RF) waves travel (or “propagate”) in the turbulent interior of a fusion furnace is crucial to maintaining an efficient, continuously operating power plant. Transmitted by an antenna in the doughnut-shaped vacuum chamber common to magnetic confinement fusion devices called tokamaks, RF waves heat the plasma fuel […]

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Embarking upon a leadership journey

Current developments in the Middle East continue to challenge people in the region and open windows to make a sustainable impact. Challenges like water access, health care, IT, vocational training, and others can be addressed collaboratively with entrepreneurial and novel problem-solving capabilities. To do so, future leaders need to understand the challenges through a regional […]

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An aspiring human rights lawyer, wielding tools from mathematics and philosophy

Ana Reyes Sanchez and her family sat in the living room, watching a movie together, just like any other night. Although she can’t recall which movie it was, she remembers seeing a shot of MIT’s Great Dome surrounded by students, and declaring, “I’m gonna go there!” Her parents smiled, thinking little of what that their […]

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Texas Rep. Targets Schools’ Books On Black History, Gender And Other Things That Make The Whites Uncomfortable

NewsOne Featured Video If one were in search of a picture-perfect modern example of how white supremacy works, they needn’t look any further than the Republican war on Critical Race Theory.  I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it a million more times: White people have no idea what CRT is. And because they don’t […]

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Mentorship programs for underrepresented applicants strive to increase graduate diversity at MIT

Graduate students from a range of departments and programs at MIT have launched application assistance programs targeting student applicants from underrepresented backgrounds.  The Graduate Application Assistance Programs (GAAPs) are run by volunteer graduate students and recent alumni dedicated to increasing diversity in their programs. Last year, GAAP mentors reached out to as many as 1,000 […]

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Task Force 2021 and Beyond submits final “blueprints for building a better MIT”

A task force charged with reimagining the future of MIT has released its final report, 18 months after it began work in the shadow of the Covid-19 pandemic. The report, from Task Force 2021 and Beyond, offers 17 recommendations to strengthen and streamline MIT, and make the Institute more successful across its teaching, research, and innovation […]

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Networking on a global scale

While international travel continues to be limited in much of the world, MIT International Science and Technology Initiatives (MISTI) sought to capitalize on the increased digital connectivity brought about by the pandemic by developing cutting-edge virtual programs designed to allow students to be exposed to international education and build connections around the world. MISTI is […]

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3 Questions: Maaya Prasad and Kathleen Esfahany on vision, perception, and the poetry of science

If you’re a frequent commuter through Kendall Square in Cambridge, Massachusetts, or a visitor to Massachusetts General Hospital, you might catch a glimpse of an art exhibit featuring some familiar faces. The exhibit, “The Poetry of Science,” pairs photographs of notable scientists, including MIT students and researchers, with poems about their research areas of interest. […]

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Arthur Mattuck, professor emeritus of mathematics, dies at 91

Arthur Paul Mattuck, emeritus professor of mathematics at MIT, passed away on Friday, Oct. 8, at the age of 91. Mattuck came to MIT as a CLE Moore Instructor, a position he held from 1955 to 1957. He joined the faculty in 1958 and retired after 52 years of service in 2010. He continued to […]

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3 Questions: Investigating a long-standing neutrino mystery

Neutrinos are one of the most mysterious members of the Standard Model, a framework for describing fundamental forces and particles in nature. While they are among the most abundant known particles in the universe, they interact very rarely with matter, making their detection a challenging experimental feat. One of the long-standing puzzles in neutrino physics […]

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Saving seaweed with machine learning

Last year, Charlene Xia ’17, SM ’20 found herself at a crossroads. She was finishing up her master’s degree in media arts and sciences from the MIT Media Lab and had just submitted applications to doctoral degree programs. All Xia could do was sit and wait. In the meantime, she narrowed down her career options, […]

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Innovating delivery of financial services for Asian banks

The MIT Hong Kong Innovation Node recently hosted its annual fintech entrepreneurship program, called MIT Entrepreneurship and Fintech Integrator (MEFTI). Designed for student innovators from MIT and Hong Kong, the program offers a real-world lens into Asia’s burgeoning financial services sector. Program partners this year included the Hong Kong Monetary Authority, DBS Bank, and WeBank, […]

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MIT to put unexpected gains to work immediately

MIT announced today that unusually strong performance by its endowment will enable greater support for undergraduate and graduate students, and investment in research operations that will strengthen its capacity to advance breakthrough science and technology. The Institute’s unitized pool of endowment and other MIT funds recorded an investment return of 55.5 percent during the fiscal […]

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Thriving Stars: An initiative to improve gender representation in electrical engineering and computer science

The MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science announced yesterday the Thriving Stars initiative, a new effort to improve gender representation in MIT’s largest doctoral graduate program. “All types of representation are vital to EECS at MIT, and Thriving Stars will unify multiple disparate efforts focusing on women and other underrepresented genders,” says Asu […]

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At the crossroads of language, technology, and empathy

Rujul Gandhi’s love of reading blossomed into a love of language at age 6, when she discovered a book at a garage sale called “What’s Behind the Word?” With forays into history, etymology, and language genealogies, the book captivated Gandhi, who as an MIT senior remains fascinated with words and how we use them. Growing […]

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