Tag: Slavery (Historical)

Virginia Supreme Court Clears Path for Removal of Robert E. Lee Statue

Virginia’s Supreme Court on Thursday unanimously affirmed the power of Gov. Ralph Northam to remove an imposing statue of Robert E. Lee in Richmond, a symbol that had become a target of demonstrators after the death of George Floyd last year. Mr. Northam had announced his intention to have the statue removed from Monument Avenue […]

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Bank of England Removes Art of Leaders Linked to Slave Trade

LONDON — The Bank of England has stopped displaying art depicting several former governors and directors after a review found they were connected to the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Oil paintings and busts of seven leading figures at the central bank between 1698 and 1814 — James Bateman, Robert Bristow, Robert Clayton, William Dawsonne, Gilbert Heathcote, […]

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Stephen B. Oates, Civil War Historian, Dies at 85

The American Historical Association, which examined the charges, issued an ambiguous ruling in 1993, saying there was “no evidence” that Dr. Oates had committed plagiarism “as it is conventionally understood.” But it did find evidence “of too great and too continuous dependence, even with attribution, on the structure, distinctive language and rhetorical strategies of other […]

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Why Must Wall Street Return to the Office?

To the Editor: Re “You Can’t Learn the Art of Closing the Deal on Zoom,” by William D. Cohan (Opinion guest essay, Aug. 18): Mr. Cohan’s cherished deal-making rooms are simply old boys’ clubs: centers of power dominated by white men and their personal networks. While personal networks still matter in most areas of business, […]

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George Washington Feared for America and Other Truths About the Founders We’ve Frozen in Time

Jefferson, who backed the South’s position, saw the conflict in apocalyptic terms. Here’s Rasmussen again: If Congress could impose a gradual emancipation scheme on Missouri as a condition of statehood, [Jefferson] reasoned, then it “may, and probably will next declare that the condition of all men within the U.S. shall be that of freedom, in […]

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‘The Lost Cause’ Is Back

If this phony “debate” over the obscure concept of critical race theory caught you off guard and unaware, you are not alone. But it is apparently part of a Republican political strategy to make race — or more precisely, the denial of American racism — a central (and winning) political issue for Republicans. As David […]

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Stillness in the Sorrow

There’s always the temptation when working with still life to arrange things so that they look just so. But my search was for the rhythms I could find inside a game of chance. It was about seeing where the photographic language I had developed in two previous books could take me now. One of those […]

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Her Family Owned Slaves. How Can She Make Amends?

DIRT TOWN VALLEY, Ga. — Just before people started to take the pandemic seriously, Stacie Marshall slipped into the back of a conference room in Athens, Ga., and joined two dozen Black farmers in a marketing seminar called “Collards Aren’t the New Kale.” She stood out, and not just because she was one of only […]

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As America’s 250th Birthday Nears, the Shape of Its Origin Story Shifts

It’s been a tough year for 1776. On Jan. 6, rioters entered the U.S. Capitol, some waving 13-starred “1776” flags. Two weeks later, President Trump’s 1776 Commission issued its report calling for “patriotic education,” which painted progressives as enemies of the timeless values of the founding. And in recent months, “1776” has been a rallying […]

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‘Critical Race Theory’ And How American History Is Taught

The debate over how American schools should teach about race and racial history has reached a curious juncture, in which it’s becoming hard to tell what the argument is about. On the one hand you have conservative state lawmakers taking aim at progressive ideas with scattershot legislation, whose target depends on which bill you read […]

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Clint Smith on ‘How the Word Is Passed’

Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | How to Listen Clint Smith’s “How the Word Is Passed” is about how places in the United States reckon with — or fail to reckon with — their relationship to the history of slavery. On this week’s podcast, Smith says that one thing that inspired the book […]

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An Iowa County Chooses to Be Named for a Black Professor, Not a Slaveowner

A county in Iowa cut ties on Thursday with a slave-owning U.S. vice president for which it had been named, choosing instead to be named for a professor who was the first Black woman to earn a doctorate in the state. They shared a surname: Johnson. Johnson County chose Lulu Merle Johnson, who taught history […]

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How Americans are Celebrating Juneteenth: Photos Across the US

Standing at the site in Galveston, Texas, where on June 19, 1865, a Union general signed an order notifying enslaved African Americans that they were free, the artist Reginald C. Adams marveled at the moment he found himself in. What would a Black man of that era think about seeing him, another Black man, painting […]

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A Juneteenth of Joy and Resistance

This article was originally published on June 9, 2020. Summers are special for African-Americans, a time to reunite with friends, dine alfresco and celebrate Juneteenth, the holiday that remembers the day — June 19, 1865 — when enslaved Africans in Galveston, Texas, learned from Union soldiers that they were free, two years after Abraham Lincoln […]

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Juneteenth Reminds Us Just How Far We Have to Go

The Northern struggle made clear that abolishing slavery would not, on its own, lead to justice or even basic fairness for free Black Americans. In October 1864, just before President Abraham Lincoln was elected to a second term, a large group of Black activists met in Syracuse, N.Y. Many had been writing, speaking and working […]

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Encounters With Ghosts on Georgia’s Golden Isles

Into the swamp Stories of slave revolts at once inspire and sadden me. Not long ago, I read that some enslaved Black people who managed to escape plantation life headed into the treacherous swamps of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida instead of fleeing north on the Underground Railroad. Some wound up in the Okefenokee Swamp, […]

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The Enslaved Artist Whose Pottery Was an Act of Resistance

The speckled brown storage jar looks humble, even homely, from a distance — something you might find on a back porch in the South. Come closer and you see the wild runs of alkaline glaze up and down the surface, and some revealing marks by the artist known as Dave the Potter or David Drake, […]

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Juneteenth Is a Federal Holiday Now. Can It Still Be Black?

We might count Juneteenth among those things Black people have long enjoyed that white folks don’t know about — like Frankie Beverly and Maze. The fact that such things exist might still be a shock to some; Americans are used to having Black culture to draw from like a renewable well. But no matter how […]

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Biden Signs Law Making Juneteenth a Federal Holiday

WASHINGTON — President Biden signed legislation on Thursday to make Juneteenth a federal holiday, enshrining June 19 as the national day to commemorate the end of slavery in the United States. “All Americans can feel the power of this day, and learn from our history,” Mr. Biden said at a ceremony at the White House, […]

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Juneteenth Poll: Most Americans Know Little or Nothing About Holiday

More than 60 percent of Americans know “nothing at all” or only “a little bit” about Juneteenth, the holiday celebrating the end of slavery in the United States, according to a new Gallup survey. The 37 percent of respondents who reported having “a lot” or “some” knowledge of the holiday may be an increase from […]

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What is Juneteenth?

Juneteenth, an annual holiday commemorating the end of slavery in the United States, has been celebrated by African-Americans since the late 1800s. But in recent years, and particularly following nationwide protests over police brutality and the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery and other Black Americans, there is a renewed interest in the […]

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Telling Stories of Slavery, One Person at a Time

AMSTERDAM — An ornate tortoise shell box with a real gold nugget on its lid has long been on display in the Rijksmuseum. Considered a high point of Dutch rococo craftsmanship, it was a gift to Prince William IV from the Dutch West India Company in 1749, when he was named the group’s governor. Look […]

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In One Modest Cotton Sack, a Remarkable Story of Slavery, Suffering, Love and Survival

As a historian, Tiya Miles is well aware of the professional obligation to proceed with caution, to keep her own expectations from getting ahead of the material at hand. But as someone who studies the history of African Americans, Native Americans and women, she has also been forced to confront what she calls “the conundrum […]

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On a Kentucky Riverbank, a Path to Remembrance

Drake, 44, who was in her 20s when she moved to Louisville with her daughter, Brianna, is blunt, warm, funny and extremely busy. In addition to her day job as chief creative officer at IDEAS xLab, she has written and performed poetry with the Louisville Ballet, as well as the Actors Theatre of Louisville. The […]

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The Remains of Nathan Bedford Forrest Are Being Exhumed in Memphis

Traditionally, Memphis residents celebrate Juneteenth at Robert R. Church Park, named for the city’s first Black millionaire. But this year, residents and city officials plan to celebrate the end of slavery one mile away, at a park where the remains of Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general and leader of the Ku Klux Klan who […]

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A Veteran Tried to Credit Black Americans on Memorial Day. His Mic Got Muted.

A little more than four minutes into Barnard Kemter’s speech at a Memorial Day service organized by the American Legion post in Hudson, Ohio, an unusual thing happened: His microphone was silenced. Mr. Kemter, 77, a retired Army lieutenant colonel who served in the Persian Gulf war, had been crediting formerly enslaved Black Americans with […]

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Targeting ‘Critical Race Theory,’ Republicans Rattle American Schools

Still, he acknowledged that Republicans had “figured out how to message this.” The messaging goes back to Mr. Trump, who, in the final weeks of the 2020 campaign, announced the formation of the 1776 Commission, set up explicitly to link what he said was “left-wing indoctrination” in schools to the sometimes violent protests over police […]

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How America Remembers— and Distorts — Its Slavery Past

HOW THE WORD IS PASSEDA Reckoning With the History of Slavery Across AmericaBy Clint Smith Where are we, exactly, in the great American slavery reckoning? Like a poorly written series watched only on random weeknights, it’s beginning to lose coherence, even — or maybe even especially — when you pay attention. In one episode, protesters […]

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This Seminary Built on Slavery and Jim Crow Has Begun Paying Reparations

[Race affects our lives in countless ways. To read more stories on race from The New York Times, sign up here for our Race/Related newsletter.] One night in 1858, Carter Dowling, an enslaved Black man forced to work without pay at the Virginia Theological Seminary in Northern Virginia, made the brave decision to escape. He […]

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