Tag: Research

Climate modeling confirms historical records showing rise in hurricane activity

When forecasting how storms may change in the future, it helps to know something about their past. Judging from historical records dating back to the 1850s, hurricanes in the North Atlantic have become more frequent over the last 150 years. However, scientists have questioned whether this upward trend is a reflection of reality, or simply […]

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‘So Many Dimensions’: A Drought Study Underlines the Complexity of Climate

Back-to-back years of little precipitation in the Indian Ocean nation of Madagascar have ruined harvests and caused hundreds of thousands of people to face uncertainty about their next meals. Aid groups say the situation there is nearing a humanitarian catastrophe. But human-induced climate change does not appear to be the driving cause, a team of […]

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This Dinosaur Found in Chile Had a Battle Ax for a Tail

It’s not every day you find a dinosaur that defended itself from predators with a completely unique weapon. In a study published Wednesday in Nature, Chilean researchers announced the discovery of a new species of ankylosaur, a family of dinosaurs known for their heavy armor, from subantarctic Chile. The animal, which they named Stegouros elengassen, […]

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An energy-storage solution that flows like soft-serve ice cream

Batteries made from an electrically conductive mixture the consistency of molasses could help solve a critical piece of the decarbonization puzzle. An interdisciplinary team from MIT has found that an electrochemical technology called a semisolid flow battery can be a cost-competitive form of energy storage and backup for variable renewable energy (VRE) sources such as […]

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SMART researchers develop method for early detection of bacterial infection in crops

Researchers from the Disruptive and Sustainable Technologies for Agricultural Precision (DiSTAP) Interdisciplinary Research Group (IRG) ofSingapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), MIT’s research enterprise in Singapore, and their local collaborators from Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory (TLL), have developed a rapid Raman spectroscopy-based method for detecting and quantifying early bacterial infection in crops. The Raman […]

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Chemist and MLK Jr. Scholar Robert Gilliard explores new frontiers in synthetic chemistry

Almost 15 years ago, Robert Gilliard posed for a photo in front of MIT’s Great Dome. At the time, he was an undergraduate at Clemson University visiting MIT with his research advisor, former MIT postdoc and Clemson University professor Rhett Smith. Just last month, Gilliard arranged a similar photo in front of the dome. This […]

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Community policing in the Global South

Community policing is meant to combat citizen mistrust of the police force. The concept was developed in the mid-20th century to help officers become part of the communities they are responsible for. The hope was that such presence would create a partnership between citizens and the police force, leading to reduced crime and increased trust. […]

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Climate Change Driving Some Albatrosses to ‘Divorce,’ Study Finds

MELBOURNE, Australia — Albatrosses usually mate for life, making them among the most monogamous creatures on the planet. But climate change may be driving more of the birds to “divorce,” a study published last week by New Zealand’s Royal Society says. The study of 15,500 breeding pairs of black-browed albatrosses on New Island in the […]

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Timber or steel? Study helps builders reduce carbon footprint of truss structures

Buildings are a big contributor to global warming, not just in their ongoing operations but in the materials used in their construction. Truss structures — those crisscross arrays of diagonal struts used throughout modern construction, in everything from antenna towers to support beams for large buildings — are typically made of steel or wood or […]

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Artificial intelligence that understands object relationships

When humans look at a scene, they see objects and the relationships between them. On top of your desk, there might be a laptop that is sitting to the left of a phone, which is in front of a computer monitor. Many deep learning models struggle to see the world this way because they don’t […]

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This Fire-Loving Fungus Eats Charcoal, if It Must

To confirm that the fungus was actually doing what it appeared to be doing, Dr. Whitman’s lab grew pine seedlings in an atmosphere with carbon dioxide containing carbon-13, an isotope whose unusual weight makes it easy to trace, and then put the trees in a specialized furnace to form charcoal, which was fed to the […]

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A Cure for Type 1 Diabetes? For One Man, It Seems to Have Worked.

Brian Shelton’s life was ruled by Type 1 diabetes. When his blood sugar plummeted, he would lose consciousness without warning. He crashed his motorcycle into a wall. He passed out in a customer’s yard while delivering mail. Following that episode, his supervisor told him to retire, after a quarter century in the Postal Service. He […]

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New ‘Omicron’ Variant Stokes Concern but Vaccines May Still Work

Scientific experts at the World Health Organization warned on Friday that a new coronavirus variant discovered in southern Africa was a “variant of concern,” the most serious category the agency uses for such tracking. The designation, announced after an emergency meeting of the health body, is reserved for dangerous variants that may spread quickly, cause […]

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Vaping Is Risky. Why Is the F.D.A. Authorizing E-Cigarettes?

When they first appeared in the United States in the mid-2000s, “electronic nicotine delivery systems” — e-cigarettes, vapes, e-liquids and other wares that contain the stimulant found in tobacco — were subject to little federal oversight. Their makers could incorporate countless other ingredients and flavorings. Like cigarettes before them, the devices proved extremely attractive to […]

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How Liberals Can Be Happier

This view garners further support from the research on happiness. A Pew Research study, for instance, ties the Republican attainment of happiness advantage over Democrats in part to more marriage, greater family satisfaction and higher levels of religious attendance. In a separate study of the conservative-liberal happiness gap, the psychologists Barry R. Schlenker, John Chambers […]

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Zena Stein, 99, Dies; Researcher Championed Women’s Health

The couple had helped write guidelines for health care in South Africa’s Freedom Charter, the 1955 statement of principles by the A.N.C. and its allied parties. Dr. Stein and Dr. Susser, along with their three children, emigrated to Britain in 1956. They initially lived in boardinghouses and worried about money; Dr. Stein worked nights in […]

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How molecular clusters in the nucleus interact with chromosomes

A cell stores all of its genetic material in its nucleus, in the form of chromosomes, but that’s not all that’s tucked away in there. The nucleus is also home to small bodies called nucleoli — clusters of proteins and RNA that help build ribosomes. Using computer simulations, MIT chemists have now discovered how these […]

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One year on this giant, blistering hot planet is just 16 hours long

The hunt for planets beyond our solar system has turned up more than 4,000 far-flung worlds, orbiting stars thousands of  light years from Earth. These extrasolar planets are a veritable menagerie, from rocky super-Earths and miniature Neptunes to colossal gas giants. Among the more confounding planets discovered to date are “hot Jupiters” —  massive balls […]

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Report: Economics drives migration from Central America to the U.S.

A new report about migration, co-authored by MIT scholars, shows that economic distress is the main factor pushing migrants from Central America to the U.S. — and highlights the personal costs borne by people as they seek to move abroad. “The core issue is economics, at the end of the day, and this is where […]

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Rescale raises $50M more to meet demand for high-performance compute

Hear from CIOs, CTOs, and other C-level and senior execs on data and AI strategies at the Future of Work Summit this January 12, 2022. Learn more San Francisco, California-based Rescale, a startup developing compute infrastructure for scientific research simulations, today announce that it raised $105 million in an expanded series C that included Jeff […]

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Why Was This Ancient Tusk 150 Miles From Land, 10,000 Feet Deep?

Mammoth tusks that are over 100,000 years old are “extremely rare,” Mr. Mol added, and studying one could give scientists new insights about the Lower Paleolithic, a poorly understood era of Earth’s history. Scientists know that around 200,000 years ago Earth was experiencing a glacial period and our ancestors were migrating out of Africa. But […]

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Peeking into a chrysalis, videos reveal growth of butterfly wing scales

If you brush against the wings of a butterfly, you will likely come away with a fine sprinkling of powder. This lepidopteran dust is made up of tiny microscopic scales, hundreds of thousands of which paper a butterfly’s wings like shingles on a wafer-thin roof. The structure and arrangement of these scales give a butterfly […]

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Nanograins make for a seismic shift

In Earth’s crust, tectonic blocks slide and grind past each other like enormous ships loosed from anchor. Earthquakes are generated along these fault zones when enough pressure builds for a block to stick, then suddenly slip. These slips can be caused by several factors that reduce friction within a fault zone, such as hotter temperatures […]

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Concerns Grow Over Safety of Aduhelm After Death of Patient Who Got the Drug

Safety data from those trials was published Monday in the journal JAMA Neurology in a study whose authors included eight Biogen employees. The data showed that 425 of 1,029 patients, or 41 percent, who received the high dose of the drug — the dose that the F.D.A. later approved — experienced either brain swelling or […]

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Getting quantum dots to stop blinking

Quantum dots, discovered in the 1990s, have a wide range of applications and are perhaps best known for producing vivid colors in some high-end televisions. But for some potential uses, such as tracking biochemical pathways of a drug as it interacts with living cells, progress has been hampered by one seemingly uncontrollable characteristic: a tendency […]

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New 10-minute test detects Covid-19 immunity

Researchers have successfully developed a rapid point-of-care test for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). This simple test, only requiring a drop of blood from a fingertip, can be performed within 10 minutes without the need for a laboratory or specially trained personnel. Currently, no similar NAb tests are commercially available within Singapore or […]

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The reasons behind lithium-ion batteries’ rapid cost decline

Lithium-ion batteries, those marvels of lightweight power that have made possible today’s age of handheld electronics and electric vehicles, have plunged in cost since their introduction three decades ago at a rate similar to the drop in solar panel prices, as documented by a study published last March. But what brought about such an astonishing […]

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Investigating pathogens and their life cycles, for the benefit of society

Desmond Edwards was a little kid when first learned about typhoid fever. Fortunately, he didn’t have the disease. He was looking at a cartoon public health announcement. The cartoon, produced by the Pan American Health Organization, was designed to educate people in his home country of Jamaica about the importance of immunizations for diseases like […]

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A stealthy way to combat tumors

Under the right circumstances, the body’s T cells can detect and destroy cancer cells. However, in most cancer patients, T cells become disarmed once they enter the environment surrounding a tumor.  Scientists are now trying to find ways to help treat patients by jumpstarting those lackluster T cells. Much of the research in this field, […]

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Marijuana Use in Pregnancy May Lead to a More Anxious, Aggressive Child

The study does not, however, prove that prenatal cannabis use caused the children’s behavioral problems. Some of the mothers said they had used cannabis only after giving birth (though THC can pass through breast milk). And women who use cannabis may differ from abstinent women in other ways that put their children at risk for […]

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How to Save Your Knees Without Giving Up Your Workout

In the annals of unsolicited advice, few nuggets have been dispensed as widely and with less supporting evidence than this: “If you keep doing all that running, you’re going to ruin your knees.” The latest salvo in the debate over knees and running — a systematic review of 43 previous MRI studies that finds no […]

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