Tag: Renting and Leasing (Real Estate)

Is the Chance to Turn Hotels Into Affordable Housing Slipping Away?

Soon after Covid devastated the New York hotel industry in the spring of 2020, politicians, developers and homeless services groups arrived at a rare consensus: This was a once-in-a-generation chance to convert struggling hotels into affordable housing. In California, which faced a similar situation during the pandemic, government agencies have helped to convert 120 sites, […]

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In Israel, the New U.S. Ambassador’s Home Lacks a Certain View

WASHINGTON — The official residences of U.S. ambassadors overseas are almost always prime pieces of real estate: stately mansions in desirable neighborhoods where American diplomats entertain dignitaries, hold high-level meetings and occasionally host presidents. In Israel, for more than half a century, the top U.S. envoy lived just outside Tel Aviv in a luxurious five-bedroom […]

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How Austin Became One of the Least Affordable Cities in America

AUSTIN — Over the last few years, in one of the fastest-growing cities in America, change has come at a feverish pace to the capital of Texas, with churches demolished, mobile home parks razed and neighborhood haunts replaced with trendy restaurants and luxury apartment complexes. The transformation has perhaps been most acutely felt across East […]

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A Social Media Influencer Supporting Afghan Women from Queens

Zahra Sahebzada had a view of the Manhattan skyline long before she moved into her Long Island City apartment. “It was on my vision board a few years back,” she said. “I’m all about manifesting.” Previously she was living in Hicksville, N.Y., on Long Island, where her family moved 20 years ago. Around 2016, she […]

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As Pandemic Evictions Rise, Spaniards Declare ‘War’ on Wall Street Landlords

The Association of Rental Housing Owners, a Spanish group which includes some of the outside investment firms, took aim at the proposed housing law, saying that rent controls would only discourage owners from building new rental units during a time of low supply. The conflict in Barcelona traces its roots to the financial crisis that […]

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How the Coronavirus Pandemic is Taking a Toll on Housing in the Bronx

Livia Fernandez used to commute every day from her one-bedroom apartment in the Bronx to an Ecuadorean restaurant in Queens, where she worked as a cook and earned $700 a week. But when the pandemic hit New York City last year, the restaurant shut down, and she lost her job. Ms. Fernandez got Covid-19 in […]

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I Am Disabled. Why Can’t I Keep My Walker Outside My Front Door?

Q: I am 98 years old and depend on a walker. For a year, I have kept it in the hallway outside my studio apartment, which I rent from a shareholder in an East Village co-op. The walker doesn’t obstruct other apartments, or restrict access to the elevator or stairwell. Nevertheless, I’ve been informed that […]

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New York to Stop Accepting Applications for Pandemic Rental Aid

New York State said on Friday that it would stop taking most requests for its pandemic rent relief for struggling tenants because an overwhelming number of applicants had left the program nearly out of money. The huge demand for aid underscores the severe economic pain inflicted by the coronavirus outbreak. Since the $2.4 billion program […]

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A Quiet Studio With a Home-Court Advantage

If you’re unhappy with your New York City apartment, it helps to have a relative who is a real estate agent. That’s what Tim Burns, 38, discovered. Earlier this year, Mr. Burns was living much too close to an overactive jackhammer. He liked his studio in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, but the construction noise — a side […]

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With Cases Piling Up, an Eviction Crisis Unfolds Step by Step

In Indianapolis, eviction courts are packed as judges make their way through a monthslong backlog of cases. In Detroit, advocates are rushing to knock on the doors of tenants facing possible eviction. In Gainesville, Fla., landlords are filing evictions at a rapid pace as displaced tenants resort to relatives’ couches for places to sleep or […]

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In a Supertall Tower, How Much Affordable Housing Is Enough?

One option could be Project-Based Section 8, a renewable federal subsidy typically for those making less than 50 percent of the area median income, although that would likely apply only to some tenants. Another approach could involve tax-exempt bonds, including 501(c)(3) bonds, a rarely used financing tool, Ms. Lamberg said, or a new allocation of […]

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Desperate for Housing Options, Communities Turn to Ballot Initiatives

LEADVILLE, Colo. — A small-business owner in a town fueled by vacationers is an unconventional proponent for a tax hike on tourists. But Marcee Lundeen sees few other choices. Gearing up for ski season at her restaurant along the main drag of this fabled mining town perched at 10,000 feet between clusters of resorts, she […]

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Why Co-Working Spaces Are Betting on the Suburbs

A recent analysis by Fitch Ratings concluded that if companies were to adopt just a day and a half of remote work per week, office landlords’ profits would fall by 15 percent. At three days, income would be slashed by 30 percent. Jim Whelan, the president of the Real Estate Board of New York, a […]

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A Surprise for Two ‘Creatives’: An Artists’ Loft in the East Village

“It was a very lax process.” That is not something you usually hear in stories about finding the perfect apartment. But for Amanda Paulsen and her partner, Peter Zusman, it’s what happened — one viewing with a brief conversation, and the next day everything was settled. “At first, it felt like it was too good […]

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The Market for Single-Family Rentals Grows as Homeownership Wanes

The supply of owner-occupied housing in the United States has grown by 10 percent over the past five years, while rental housing has increased just 1 percent. Freddie Mac estimates the housing undersupply in the United States to be more than 275,000 homes. “There is as much a shortage of homes in the rental market […]

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WeWork Stock Starts Trading After SPAC Deal

“I made a wrong decision,” Masayoshi Son, SoftBank’s chief executive, said last year. “I didn’t look at WeWork right.” SoftBank has agreed to cap its voting power in the company below 50 percent. SoftBank and other investors have to wait several months before they can sell their shares. The pandemic, which emptied office towers around […]

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As Rents Rise, So Do Pressures on People at Risk of Eviction

ATLANTA — Every time Jeffery Jones hears a noise outside his house, his heart skips a beat. Since his landlord directed the county to evict him, his fiancée and their 2-year-old son from their modest gray house in the Atlanta suburb of Loganville, Ga., it is just a matter of time before the noise he […]

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Rising Rents Stoke Inflation Data, a Concern for Washington

The recovery in the New York area as a whole has been uneven as some families have moved to the city, bidding up prices, while others are struggling to pay, said Jay Martin, executive director of the Community Housing Improvement Program, which represents landlords of mostly rent-stabilized housing. “You have bidding wars for one unit, […]

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California Homeowners Flex Their Political Muscle

Some may roll their eyes at the thought that a coalition of mostly affluent homeowners could qualify as “grass roots,” a term more commonly associated with social justice movements. But they would be wrong: Throughout his four-decade reign, Close and SOHA have consistently out-organized, out-hustled and outmaneuvered their political opponents. In the 1980s, Close and […]

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As Big Tech Grows in the Pandemic, Seattle Grows With It

There is also a “desire to improve diversity,” he said, by establishing a presence in cities, like Atlanta, Miami and Washington, that have large populations of Black and Hispanic people, who are underrepresented in technology. For example, Chicago had few tech jobs, and college students who wanted to work in the industry had to move […]

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Why Some Tenants In Brooklyn Stopped Paying Rent

It has been years since Patricia Edwards’s top floor apartment in Brooklyn has felt like an acceptable home. When it rains, water leaks into the kitchen and living room. It also pours through a crack in the bathroom ceiling so big that Ms. Edwards needs an umbrella just to use the toilet. Still, at around […]

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‘The Moratorium Saved Us. It Really Did.’

If the main lessons we take from the eviction moratorium have to do with how to configure a better moratorium for the next national emergency, we will have failed. We should be dedicating ourselves to building a better housing system, one that ensures we don’t face an eviction crisis come next pandemic — or next […]

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A TikTok Subway Artist Finds His Way to the Lower East Side

At first, he posted time-lapse videos of his sketches-in-progress, set to a catchy song, offering viewers the chance to compare his portraits with their real-life inspirations — the pencil-shadow precision of the wrinkled jeans or the cockeyed face mask. He started getting more views but not as much as he hoped. “I was posting thinking, […]

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In Oak Bluffs, Strangers Become Family

“I was part of the social justice task force that pushed our athletic department to look more into hiring practices,” Mr. Williams said. “We also pushed for antiracism sensitivity training for our coaching staff and players. It’s all about community, and what I feel on the island, I try to create in other spaces.” Meanwhile, […]

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