Tag: Race and Ethnicity

Minneapolis’ School Plan Asks White Families to Help Integrate

But Ms. Jackson couldn’t help but ask: Why now? To her, some changes, like the planned renovation, signaled gentrification. Even as North High opened up to white families, some Black families, like hers, were reassigned to a different school, though North’s low enrollment meant that, for now, they could apply to stay. “I feel like […]

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How a Prosecutor Addressed a Mostly White Jury and Won a Conviction in the Arbery Case

“Anybody with warm blood running through their veins that witnessed the video and knew the context around what transpired knew that it was wrong,” Mr. King said. The case, from the beginning, echoed painful themes in the Deep South. The murder of a Black man by white men carrying guns, presented to a jury that […]

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Pinterest Pledges $50 Million on Reforms to Resolve Discrimination Allegations

Pinterest pledged $50 million to overhaul its corporate culture and promote diversity as part of an agreement to resolve allegations that it discriminated against women and people of color, according to court documents and statements from the plaintiffs and the company. The settlement was announced on Wednesday by Seth Magaziner, the general treasurer of Rhode […]

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The Guilty Verdicts in the Ahmaud Arbery Case Are a Welcome Respite

All three defendants in the killing of Ahmaud Arbery were found guilty of murder. Arbery was jogging through a South Georgia neighborhood. The men formed a posse that became what has been described as a “lynch mob.” They stalked Arbery, hunted him down, insisted on detaining him, and then one of the men — Travis […]

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U.S. Reacts to Guilty Verdict in Ahmaud Arbery Murder Case

From the moment the first guilty verdict was uttered inside a Georgia courtroom, a cascade of tears and shouts of vindication coursed across the country. Black parents called their children, weeping. Activists choked up, embracing what they called a rare instance of justice. In a country whose cavernous divides over race, guns and vigilante violence […]

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‘Justice Was Served’: Guilty Verdicts in the Ahmaud Arbery Case

To the Editor: Re “Three Men Found Guilty of Murdering Ahmaud Arbery” (Live Updates, nytimes.com, Nov. 24): All three defendants were found guilty of murder in the Ahmaud Arbery trial and face a sentence of up to life in prison. Many who saw the video and who followed the evidence in the trial might say […]

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Charlottesville Extremists Lose in Court, but Replacement Theory Lives On

The jury verdict on Tuesday holding a dozen white supremacists liable for the violence at the 2017 “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Va., was a victory for those who have long inveighed against far-right extremists and a rare example of hate group leaders being held responsible not only for the language they use, but […]

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The Age of the Creative Minority

At a recent Faith Angle Forum in France, the British political scientist Matthew Goodwin defined wokeness as a belief system organized around “the sacralization of racial, gender and sexual minorities.” I’d add that right-wing populism is organized around the sacralization of the white working class and the belief that left-wing minority groups have now become […]

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Ahmaud Arbery Was Murdered. But His Life Will Not Be Forgotten.

There is a memory I will never forget. It sits in my body like a nightmare. It crept from my feet, up to my stomach and into my mind as my ears heard “not guilty” and “Kyle Rittenhouse” in the same sentence. I sighed. “Damn,” I said, my body getting a little hot from the […]

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Georgia’s University System Will Not Rename Buildings With Ties to Slavery

Georgia’s public university system will not rename 75 buildings and colleges, whose names an advisory committee recommended changing because they included supporters of slavery and racial segregation. Members of the Board of Regents for Georgia’s public university system, voting unanimously on Monday, said in a statement that while the regents had recognized the “importance of […]

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Sika Henry and the Motivation to Become a Pro Triathlete

As Sika Henry worked to become the first female African American professional triathlete, she remembered her childhood conversations about race with her family. Her parents told Henry and her brother, Nile, stories about their paternal grandfather, who was a track and field athlete and football player in the 1920s. Because of segregation, he was not […]

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Charlottesville Rally Trial: Jury Finds Organizers Liable

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — Jurors on Tuesday found the main organizers of the deadly right-wing rally in Charlottesville, Va., in 2017 liable under state law for injuries to counterprotesters, awarding more than $25 million in damages. But the jury deadlocked on federal conspiracy charges. The case in U.S. District Court in Charlottesville was brought by nine […]

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Rittenhouse and the Right’s White Vigilante Heroes

Kyle Rittenhouse, the 18-year-old who shot and killed two men and wounded a third last year during protests of the police shooting of Jacob Blake, was found not guilty Friday of all charges by a Wisconsin jury. One can argue about the particulars of the case, about the strength of the defense and the ham-handedness […]

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The Real Surprise of ‘Passing’: A Focus on Black Women’s Inner Lives

Midway through the new drama “Passing,” Irene Redfield (Tessa Thompson), the light-brown-skinned, upper-middle-class protagonist, offers a unique insight into her psyche when she says to her friend Hugh, “We’re, all of us, passing for something or the other,” and adds, “Aren’t we?” Until now, Irene has successfully maintained her cover as both a respectable wife […]

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Here’s a Fact: We’re Routinely Asked to Use Leftist Fictions

Our times often put me in mind of Tennessee Williams’s “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof,” when Big Daddy says: “What is the smell in this room? Don’t you notice it, Brick? Don’t you notice a powerful and obnoxious odor of mendacity in this room?” These days, an aroma of delusion lingers, with ideas presented […]

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Discussions of Race Are Notably Absent in Trial of Arbery’s Accused Killers

BRUNSWICK, Ga. — When Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old Black man, was chased through a Georgia neighborhood by three white men and shot at close range, his killing was widely viewed as an act of racial violence. One of the men uttered a racist slur moments after shooting Mr. Arbery, one of his co-defendants told the […]

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Why Are More Black Children Dying by Suicide?

“This is a deterrent,” said Dr. Kali D. Cyrus, a psychiatrist at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C., and an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins University. Talking about your family’s business with a white person — much less an outsider — is often discouraged in the Black community, added Dr. Cyrus, who is Black. Most […]

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Relocation of Federal Agency Hurt Diversity, Watchdog Finds

WASHINGTON — A decision by the Trump administration to move the headquarters of the Bureau of Land Management to Grand Junction, Colo., from Washington left the agency with high vacancy rates as veteran employees — especially African Americans — quit rather than relocate, a government watchdog said in a report issued this week. Senior officials […]

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The Suburbs Are Poorer and More Diverse Than We Realize

This signal is meant to activate, in particular, white folks who remain in the suburbs. We know that now, in the nation’s largest metropolitan areas, the majority of Black residents live in the suburbs. Now the majority of immigrants live in the suburbs. Now the majority of Latinx and Asian Americans live there. But most […]

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From Kyle Rittenhouse to Steve Bannon, the Brazenness of White Men

There is quite the convergence at the moment of race and justice as cases featuring white male defendants accused of everything from murder to insurrection dominate news coverage. There is a virtual pageant of privilege as the country waits to see if our system of justice will deal as severely and unsparingly with these men […]

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Afrofuturist Room at the Met Redresses a Racial Trauma

More than a year after the racial reckoning, the Metropolitan Museum of Art has created one of its most thoughtful reparations projects yet. I do not mean its returning of some priceless artifacts back to West Africa, or its addressing of past racial wrongs with a restitution fund to support diversity in the arts, or […]

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Brittany Luse and Eric Eddings of ‘For Colored Nerds’ Play for Keeps

After graduating in the recession era, both groped toward the semblance of a career path. Luse moved back in with her parents and worked a series of internships and low-level clerical jobs at companies undergoing mass layoffs. She says she quit a full-time position in 2011 after being sexually harassed. The following year, Luse got […]

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Is It Time to Abandon the Idea of an ‘Asian American’ Identity?

Produced by ‘The Argument’ Asian Americans are the fastest-growing racial group in the United States, and understanding their representation in culture, politics and society is getting increasingly complex. In the New York City mayoral election this month, the Republican candidate, Curtis Sliwa, won 44 percent of the vote in precincts where more than half of […]

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‘Woke’ Went the Way of ‘P.C.’ and ‘Liberal’

“Woke” has also followed a trajectory similar to that of the phrase “politically correct,” which carried a similar meaning by the late 1980s and early 1990s: “Politically correct,” unsurprisingly, went from describing a way of seeing the world to describing the people who saw the world that way to describing the way other people felt […]

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US Goal of Racial Equity in Infrastructure Is Left to States

While business leaders in the community say the highway would connect the town to economic hubs in Louisiana, Ms. Wiley worries it will displace her church and neighbors. “Looking at where I live right now, it’s like they want to push us out farther and, well, it will gentrify the community,” said Ms. Wiley, the […]

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U.S. Goal of Racial Equity in Infrastructure Is Left to States

While business leaders in the community say the highway would connect the town to economic hubs in Louisiana, Ms. Wiley worries it will displace her church and neighbors. “Looking at where I live right now, it’s like they want to push us out farther and, well, it will gentrify the community,” said Ms. Wiley, the […]

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The Absurd Side of the Social Justice Industry

If you follow debates over the strident style of social justice politics often derided as “wokeness,” you might have heard about a document called “Advancing Health Equity: A Guide to Language, Narrative and Concepts.” Put out by the American Medical Association and the Association of American Medical Colleges Center for Health Justice, the guide is […]

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Colorism and Racism Belong to the Same Family

One of the things I often hear as a person who frequently writes about race, ethnicity and equality, is that the browning of America — the coming shift of the country from mostly white to mostly nonwhite — is one of the greatest hopes in the fight against white supremacy and oppression. But this argument […]

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How My Faith Shapes My View of Racism and History

I don’t remember the first time I was taught that the Civil War was not fought because of slavery. I am a white Texan, so this idea was simply in the ether, as were myths about “good slave owners” and the “Lost Cause.” I knew that America had a racist history, but when I was […]

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