Tag: Poverty

How Tech is Helping Poor People Get Government Aid

Sometimes barriers to aid are created deliberately. When Florida’s unemployment system proved unresponsive at the start of the pandemic, Gov. Ron DeSantis told CBS Miami last year that his predecessor’s administration devised it to drive people away. “It was, ‘Let’s put as many kind of pointless roadblocks along the way, so people just say, oh, […]

Read More

Social Welfare Can Break the Intergenerational Cycle of Poverty

Another study has found that when the children who grew up in Medicaid-eligible households were in their 20s, they were more likely to have gone to college than those whose families, despite their similar economic circumstances, had the misfortune of living in a state where their families were not eligible for Medicaid. Now they are […]

Read More

Dear People of 2021: What Can We Learn From Hindsight?

Our forebears had a lot of ideas about where we’d be by now. Go back just a few years, and you’ll find no end of prophecies about the world we’d inhabit today — tech fantasies of roads filled with self-driving machines, dire visions of critical water sources gone dry, projections of cities and markets growing […]

Read More

Extreme Poverty Has Been Sharply Cut. What Has Changed?

Hindsight is a series from the Headway team looking back at predictions and promises from the past. When Alan Piazza visited isolated villages in north central China in the 1990s as an economist for the World Bank, he found a place of “almost impossible poverty.” People in the Ningxia region lived in cave dwellings dug […]

Read More

The Humble Beginnings of Today’s Culinary Delicacies

Eating, or rather being able to eat whatever you like, whether sumptuous or spartan, can be a means of exerting control. Sometimes this manifests as culinary tourism, dabbling in the foods of other cultures or classes, with the assurance of knowing you can always retreat to the safety of your own. I’ve never forgotten a […]

Read More

Where Are Young People Most Optimistic? In Poorer Nations.

Md. Rafaiat Ullah, 24, a university student in Chittagong, Bangladesh, said he thought he would be in a better financial position than his parents because of education. “My parents didn’t get a chance to be educated that much,” he said. “But even though they didn’t, they did educate me. Education creates opportunity.” In developing countries, […]

Read More

The ‘Benefits Cliff’ Discourages People From Making More Money

One person I interviewed for this newsletter was Anne Kandilis, director of Springfield WORKS/Western Massachusetts Economic Development Council. She’s supporting a state bill that would experiment with redirecting the state’s earned-income tax credit to counteract the fall from the benefits cliff, topping up families’ resources so they don’t decline when adults in the household increase […]

Read More

Of Course Joe Manchin Drives a Maserati

When not aboard his $220,000 houseboat, Sen. Joe Manchin—who recently has been portrayed as D.C.’s cartoon villain du jour—may or may not own a Maserati Levante, which can retail for somewhere around $80,000. Advertisement The moderate West Virginia Democrat was caught in the luxury vehicle while surrounded by climate change activists Thursday morning, according to […]

Read More

Pressure Grows on G20 Nations to Get Covid Vaccines to the Poor

ROME — From the opening moments of the Group of 20 summit on Saturday, the leaders of the world’s largest economies wanted to send a strong message about ending the coronavirus pandemic: During an unconventional group photograph, they were joined on the dais by doctors in white coats and first responders from the Italian Red […]

Read More

Education in Latin America after the pandemic

In early 2020, Covid-19 forced countries across Latin America to take measures to keep children, young people, and adults away from schools. Many countries have declared educational quarantines as part of efforts to stop the pandemic, but more than a year-and-a-half later, governments are already thinking, what is next? While the pandemic may not be […]

Read More

Higher Food Prices Hit the Poor and Those Who Help Them

The recent trend reverses a decade of relatively low food price inflation, Mr. Swanson added, a period in which many Americans got used to buying ample supplies of beef, chicken, turkey and fish. Now that is more of a challenge. “We do a lot of pasta and beans,” Ms. Mueller said. “It’s a lot cheaper. […]

Read More

Ingenuity, design, and human spirit

The Azraq refugee camp in Jordan hosts about 35,000 people displaced by the Syrian civil war, who live in rows of small white steel sheds. Several years ago, a camp resident named Majid Al-Kanaan undertook a project to combat the visual and existential monotony of camp life. Using clay and stones from camp terrain, he […]

Read More

Debate Looms Over I.M.F.: Should It Do More Than Put Out Fires?

Lopsided access to vaccinations, extreme economic inequality, rising food prices and staggering debt are on the agenda when the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank gather for their annual meetings in Washington next week. A pressing issue not in the official program is the controversy that has been swirling for weeks around the chief […]

Read More

MIT receives $15M USAID award to promote research and innovation at universities in Latin America

MIT has received a $15 million award from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), announced today at a ceremony in Guatemala City. USAID granted the award to fund the Achieving Sustainable Partnerships in Innovation, Research, and Entrepreneurship (ASPIRE) program. The award will support a collaboration between MIT, Universidad del Valle de Guatemala (UVG), […]

Read More

On Concerns About Debt, and Disregard for Climate and Child Poverty

Do you remember the days of the Simpson-Bowles debt-reduction plan? A decade ago elite opinion was obsessed with the supposed need for immediate action on budget deficits. This consensus among what I used to call Very Serious People was so strong that as Ezra Klein, now a Times Opinion writer, wrote, deficits somehow became an […]

Read More

Manchin’s Plan to Shrink Biden’s $3.5 Trillion Bill May Hurt Families in Need

“I would probably favor having the college benefit and the community college piece means-tested. But some point out that, overwhelmingly, people going to community college are going to meet the means test, so there is some degree to which if you put up a paperwork, means-testing requirement on something that is already largely for low- […]

Read More

Ana Pantelic appointed executive director of MIT D-Lab

MIT D-Lab recently welcomed new Executive Director Ana Pantelic to its team. Pantelic has worked at the confluence of systems change and social innovation and brings nearly 15 years of experience in policy and practice from Latin America, East Africa, and the Balkans. “As we prepare to enter our third decade, we are excited to […]

Read More

Book Review: ‘Invisible Child,’ by Andrea Elliott

INVISIBLE CHILD Poverty, Survival and Hope in an American City By Andrea Elliott Best we can tell, there are 1.38 million homeless schoolchildren in the United States. About one in 12 live in New York City. Several years ago, readers of this paper got to meet one, an 11-year-old Black girl with an unforgettable name: […]

Read More

Citizens emerge from the slums

Do the world’s nearly 1 billion urban poor, who subsist without legal housing, reliable water and sewer infrastructure, and predictable employment, lack political engagement as well? Ying Gao does not buy the claim by many social scientists that social and economic marginalization necessarily means political marginalization. “My results contradict the prevailing wisdom about slums and […]

Read More

Saving the Artwork of the South: Deep Investment, and a Drone

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — “I’m the conjurer of all my ancestors, 400 years of African people in America,” said Joe Minter, surveying the dense outdoor environment of artworks he has forged from refuse over the past 32 years across his half-acre yard, facing two of the largest African-American cemeteries in the south. Nodding to the tombstones, […]

Read More