Tag: Newspapers

Local News Outlets May Reap $1.7 Billion in Build Back Better Aid

Representative Steve Scalise of Louisiana, the second-ranking House Republican, echoed that criticism on Twitter: “This is Biden and Dems in Congress helping pay the reporters’ salaries who cover for them.” The tax credit would be an unusual instance of federal aid for news organizations, but it is not entirely new. Mr. Waldman noted that the […]

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Judge Tries to Block New York Times’s Coverage of Project Veritas

A New York trial court judge ordered The New York Times on Thursday to temporarily refrain from publishing or seeking out certain documents related to the conservative group Project Veritas, an unusual instance of a court blocking coverage by a major news organization. The order raised immediate concerns among First Amendment advocates, who called it […]

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Can The Washington Post De-Snark the News?

Produced by ‘Sway’ In May, Sally Buzbee became the first woman to be hired for one of the most coveted jobs in journalism: executive editor of The Washington Post. Since then, Buzbee has overseen ambitious digital investigations into the Jan. 6 capitol attack and how countries’ climate pledges are based on flawed information. But she’s […]

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U.S. and China Agree to Ease Restrictions on Journalists

WASHINGTON — The United States and China announced an agreement on Tuesday to ease restrictions on foreign journalists operating in the two countries, tempering a diplomatic confrontation that led to the expulsion of some American reporters from China during the last year of the Trump administration. The deal was first reported by China Daily, the […]

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Zuo Fang, a Founder of China’s Southern Weekly, is Dead

Zuo Fang, a journalist who helped start China’s most influential reform-era newspaper and edited it with the conviction that the press should inform, enlighten and entertain rather than parrot Communist Party propaganda, died on Nov. 3 in Guangzhou, China. He was 86. His death, in a hospital, was announced by the newspaper he co-founded, Southern […]

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It’s Time for the Media to Choose: Neutrality or Democracy?

Produced by ‘The Ezra Klein Show’ “Making it harder to vote, and harder to understand what the party is really about — these are two parts of the same project” for the Republican Party, Jay Rosen writes. “The conflict with honest journalism is structural. To be its dwindling self, the G.O.P. has to also be […]

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New York Times Adds 455,000 Subscribers in Third Quarter

The New York Times Company said on Wednesday that it added 455,000 new digital subscribers in the third quarter, a gain that keeps the publisher on pace to reach its stated goal of 10 million subscriptions by 2025. Of the new digital subscribers, 320,000 signed up for The Times’s journalism. The rest came for Games, […]

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Why Humans, Not Machines, Make the Tough Calls on Comments

Times Insider explains who we are and what we do, and delivers behind-the-scenes insights into how our journalism comes together. An abbreviation considered vulgar by New York Times standards also refers to perfectly innocent people aspiring to become bachelors of science. Here is a small but revealing reason that artificial intelligence cannot replace human news […]

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As Hong Kong’s Civil Society Buckles, One Group Tries to Hold On

HONG KONG — Unions have folded. Political parties have shut down. Independent media outlets and civil rights groups have disappeared. The Hong Kong government, its authority backed fully by Beijing, is shutting down the city’s civil society, once the most vibrant in Asia, one organization at a time. But one group, the Hong Kong Journalists […]

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How Newspapers Deserted Their Civic Mission

The background worldview of this upper-crust demographic is broadly liberal. Like other media critics, Usher bemoans the hoary trope of the “Trump safari”—the reflexive impulse across many elite liberal news outlets to dispatch intrepid anthropological teams of reporters into heartland diners and other small-town venues to chronicle the mores and thought processes of the mysterious, […]

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Sheriff Is Charged With Falsely Accusing Black Newspaper Carrier of Threats

A sitting sheriff in Washington State has been charged with making a false claim that a Black man had driven up to his home and threatened to kill him, prosecutors said. Sheriff Ed Troyer of Pierce County called 911 in January 2021 to report that he had used his S.U.V. to corner a man who […]

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Governor Accuses Reporter of Hacking After Flaws in State Website Are Revealed

A reporter at The St. Louis Post-Dispatch this week alerted Missouri education officials that a state website that lists teachers’ names and certification status had a flaw: The page made the teachers’ Social Security numbers easily available. The Post-Dispatch also notified the teachers’ union and waited two days until the state had fixed the problem […]

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Two Journalists Started an Argument in Boston in 1979. It’s Not Over Yet.

A diverse new generation of reporters has sought to dismantle the old order, and much of the conflict was playing out, in recent years, at The Washington Post, whose top editor at the time, Martin Baron, had won Pulitzers and challenged presidents by making use of the traditional tools of newspaper journalism. But Mr. Baron […]

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He’s Australia’s Most Decorated Soldier. Did He Also Kill Helpless Afghans?

But it is unlikely that all the soldiers will go to trial, given the increasing challenge of collecting evidence about events that happened over a decade ago, said Ben Saul, who teaches international law at the University of Sydney. “The longer this drags on,” he said, “the more difficult it is to get a successful […]

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‘Fake News’ Bill in South Korea Gets Shelved Amid Outcry

SEOUL — President Moon Jae-in and his Democratic Party in South Korea have spent months vowing to stamp out what they have called fake news in the media. But lawmakers had to postpone a vote on a new bill this week when they encountered a problem: no one can agree on exactly how to do […]

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Edward Keating, Times Photographer at Ground Zero, Dies at 65

Edward Keating, who for more than a month did whatever it took, even disguising himself as a worker, to photograph the wreckage at ground zero after Sept. 11, 2001, contributing to a body of work that brought The New York Times a Pulitzer Prize for photography for its 9/11 coverage, died on Sunday in Manhattan. […]

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Jim Jarmusch’s Collages Are Ready for Their Close-Up

Jim Jarmusch likes removing the heads. He likes to swap the heads of world leaders with Picassos or Basquiats, or simply excise them entirely, leaving a head-shaped void. A man with a coyote’s head rides in the back of a car, rather dejected. Warhol’s head is a favorite motif: twin Andys in sunglasses standing stoically […]

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