Tag: Neil Gorsuch

Ted Cruz Thinks There Are Only Two Votes on the Supreme Court to Overturn Roe. What?

This dynamic bubbled up to the surface most recently last June, when the Supreme Court ruled in Bostock v. Clayton County that gay and transgender workers are protected by Title VII’s ban on workplace discrimination. The 6-3 ruling was written by none other than Justice Neil Gorsuch, the deeply conservative jurist that former President Donald […]

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From Right to Left, There Are Plenty of Culprits for the Looming Roe Disaster

People sometimes refer to Collins as naïve, or hopelessly naïve. This is nonsense. She lied. Maine leans Democratic overall, but its GOP is nuts; remember Paul LePage? She obviously feared a primary if she didn’t find some lame excuse to vote for Kavanaugh. If Roe is overturned next June, she’ll undoubtedly profess her “shock” and […]

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The Supreme Court Is Poised to Sabotage the Administrative State

Most members of the Supreme Court’s conservative bloc have aired similar complaints. Perhaps most famously, Justice Neil Gorsuch sharply criticized Chevron deference while serving on the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals, arguing that it allowed “executive bureaucracies to swallow huge amounts of core judicial and legislative power and concentrate federal power in a way that […]

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Only a Death-Row Prisoner Could Make the Supreme Court Skeptical of a Religious Freedom Claim

It still wasn’t enough for Justice Samuel Alito, who wrote a dissent in Murphy’s case, joined by Thomas and Justice Neil Gorsuch, where he argued that both men should have been denied a stay of execution because of timing reasons. “This Court receives an application to stay virtually every execution; these applications are almost all […]

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The Supreme Court’s Plot Against Democracy—and the Planet

It’s been a jam-packed week for the Supreme Court: On Monday, the justices delved into Senate Bill 8, Texas’s controversial abortion bounty law, and sounded very skeptical about whether they’ll allow it to stand. A day later, they waded into a thorny dispute between members of a community college board, in a case that could have far-reaching First Amendment […]

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The Supreme Court Could Save Tribal Sovereignty—or Demolish It

In one particularly cynical footnote, the Brackeens argued that even if the court adopts their race-based approach to Indian law, the other federal statutes that would be affected are largely nineteenth-century relics of a more overtly racist past, including one that contributed to the problem the ICWA was designed to fix. “To be sure, some […]

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It’s Not My Fault That People Don’t Like the Supreme Court Anymore

It’s also worth noting that the justices themselves are rarely better at public engagement than the institution. Their public appearances are generally limited to law-school lectures or presentations to various legal groups, with reporters often forbidden from filming them. Unless they are part of book tours like the one Breyer is currently on, the justices […]

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