Tag: Native Americans

Burial Ground Under the Alamo Stirs a Texas Feud

SAN ANTONIO — Raymond Hernandez was a boy when his grandfather would take him on walks to the Alamo, pointing at the grounds around the Spanish mission founded in the 18th century. “He’d tell me again and again, ‘They built all this on top of our campo santo,’” said Mr. Hernandez, 73, using the Spanish […]

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Her Art Reads the Land in Deep Time

On a bright morning recently in Downtown Brooklyn, the artist Athena LaTocha stood by a construction site where pile drivers and earth-moving machines were excavating the foundation for a new skyscraper, and examined the scene with a kind of creative recognition. “This equipment is an extension of us, right? It’s an extension of the operator’s […]

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A Thanksgiving History Lesson, in a Handful of Corn

These goals are part of an attempt to revive the deep, almost symbiotic relationship between corn and humans. “For Native people, it’s not just about growing out the corn and bringing it back home,” Mrs. Greendeer said. “It’s about creating a spiritual connection and relationship with this being, the corn. She’s alive. So the goal […]

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Jimmie Durham, Sculptor Who Explored Indigenous Themes, Dies at 81

Mr. Durham also liked to work with shards of Murano glass, giving his artwork flashes of light and color. He took a glassblowing workshop in Marseilles with a friend, the Norwegian artist Jone Kvie, in 2016, and the two ended up mounting a gallery show together, exhibiting glass “puddles,” as he called them, and other […]

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Researchers Identify Dozens of Native Students Who Died at Nebraska School

On the edge of town in Genoa, Neb., a stone monument serves as a gravestone on the grounds of a government-run boarding school for Native Americans that has been shuttered for almost a century. No one knows how many students died there, at the Genoa U.S. Indian Industrial School, though thousands are believed to have […]

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To Honor His Indigenous Ancestors, He Became a Champion

The night before, Stevens sat in his bedroom, lined with medals and first-place plaques. “Oregon,” he said, calm and sure, “that’s the school for me. I want to run for Oregon.” The state meet took place on a hilly, windswept course in Reno where Stevens watched runners from the biggest schools race first. He paid […]

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Biden Plans to Bar New Drilling Around a Major Native American Cultural Site

WASHINGTON — President Biden will announce on Monday that his administration is moving to block new federal oil and gas leasing within a 10-mile radius around Chaco Canyon in New Mexico, one of the nation’s oldest and most culturally significant Native American sites, according to White House officials. The announcement is to come as Mr. […]

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Flooding and Nuclear Waste Eat Away at a Tribe’s Ancestral Home

For decades, chronic flooding and nuclear waste have encroached on the ancestral lands in southeastern Minnesota that the Prairie Island Indian Community calls home, whittling them to about a third of their original size. Two years after the tribe received federal recognition in 1936, the Army Corps of Engineers installed a lock-and-dam system just to […]

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Lawmakers Ask Biden to Rescind Medals for Wounded Knee Massacre

More than a dozen members of Congress have called on President Biden to use his executive authority to revoke Medals of Honor awarded for the killings of members of the Lakota Sioux tribe, including unarmed women and children, at Wounded Knee, S.D., in the 19th century. In a letter coordinated by Senator Elizabeth Warren, Democrat […]

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A New Kind of Native American Dance Troupe

One day in October, the dancer Kenneth Shirley got a message from Injury Reserve, a hip-hop group he had befriended in Phoenix, where he grew up and still lives. The band was performing in Manhattan and had noticed from Shirley’s Instagram posts that he was on the East Coast, too. Would he like to come […]

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Readers’ Farewell to Nicholas Kristof, ‘One of a Kind’

To the Editor: Re “A Farewell to Readers, With Hope,” by Nicholas Kristof (Opinion guest essay, Oct. 31): Considering that my level of cynicism on the human race is rising by the day, this farewell essay by Mr. Kristof could not have come at a better time. I have long enjoyed reading his columns, but […]

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DNA Confirms Sitting Bull Was South Dakota Man’s Great-Grandfather

For years, Ernie LaPointe, a writer and Vietnam veteran, claimed that he was the great-grandson of Sitting Bull, the Hunkpapa Lakota leader famous for resisting the federal government’s efforts to seize the Great Plains. He has had his mother’s oral history verified by Smithsonian researchers, and a lock of hair and wool leggings belonging to […]

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A California Law School Reckons With the Shame of Native Massacres

Ultimately, Mr. Faigman said in an interview, the question of whether Hastings keeps its name rests with the Legislature and the governor. His critics say Hastings should proactively demand the change. A spokeswoman for Mr. Newsom, Erin Mellon, said the governor hoped Californians would “think critically about the harmful legacies of our forebears.” The governor […]

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Before ‘Dune,’ Frank Herbert Learned From Native Americans

In Brian Herbert’s understanding, the environmentalism of “Dune” was partly based on conversations between his Mr. Hansen and his father. Mr. Hansen himself felt that he had “contributed many of the ideas” of the novel, his widow, Joanne Hansen, told me. “They explored the idea of Dune, a planet without water,” she said. “They spent […]

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Blackfeet Nation Mourns Longtime Leader Chief Earl Old Person

Throughout his life, Chief Earl Old Person of the Blackfeet Nation could be found in the Browning High School gym, always seated in the northwest corner of the bleachers and always in his blue, long-sleeved, buttoned shirt, cheering for his alma mater. But for his final trip into the gym, he was not in the […]

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‘Tomahawk’ Video Of White Math Teacher In ‘Fake Feather Headdress’ Mocking Native Americans Goes Viral

NewsOne Featured Video There is growing outrage from a viral video that shows a white math teacher in her California high school’s classroom appearing to mock Native American tradition by donning a “fake feather headdress” and performing a dance in front of students that was widely construed as being culturally disrespectful. The video was posted […]

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Earl Old Person, Chief of the Blackfeet Nation, Dies at 92

Earl Old Person was born on April 15, 1929, in a village outside Browning, just east of Glacier National Park and within the 2,285-square mile Blackfeet Indian Reservation. His parents, Juniper and Molly (Bear Medicine) Old Person, were ranchers who spoke almost no English. Neither did Earl, until elementary school, and he continued to speak […]

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N.F.L.’s Top Lawyer Had Cozy Relationship With Washington Team President

A year later, when the league penalized Washington and Dallas for violating league spending limits, Allen asked to speak with Pash. “Still talking internally about this,” Pash replied. “I am not making any promises as to an outcome. But I can assure you that I am not blowing you off.” After Allen thanked him, Pash […]

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Indigenous Peoples’ Day: 10 Things You Wouldn’t Have Without Native Americans

NewsOne Featured Video Source: grandriver / Getty Indigenous Peoples’ Day finally allows us to highlight Native Americans and their contributions to American society. October 8, 2021, Joe Biden became the first president to acknowledge the holiday declaring it a national holiday, which we now celebrate on October 11. In a proclamation Biden said, “On Indigenous Peoples’ […]

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What is Indigenous Peoples’ Day?

Are there closures for the day? The United States Postal Service and post offices will be closed in observation of Columbus Day, as will most banks. Most government offices and libraries will be closed. Stores like Walmart and Target and most grocery stores are open. In some cities, like New York, trash and recycling collection […]

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Indian Health Service Reverses Policy on Black Natives

The Indian Health Service announced this week that Black Native Americans in the Seminole Nation, known as the Freedmen, will now be eligible for health care through the federal agency, which previously denied them coronavirus vaccinations and other care. The shift in policy comes as the Biden administration and members of Congress are pressuring the […]

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Biden to Restore Three National Monuments in Utah and New England

WASHINGTON — President Biden is expected to announce on Friday that he will use his executive authority to restore sweeping environmental protections to three major national monuments that had been stripped away by former President Donald J. Trump, according to a person familiar with the matter. Mr. Biden will reinstate and slightly expand the original […]

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The Supreme Court Could Save Tribal Sovereignty—or Demolish It

In one particularly cynical footnote, the Brackeens argued that even if the court adopts their race-based approach to Indian law, the other federal statutes that would be affected are largely nineteenth-century relics of a more overtly racist past, including one that contributed to the problem the ICWA was designed to fix. “To be sure, some […]

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Indian Health Service ‘Willfully Ignored’ Sexual Abuse by Doctor, Report Finds

WASHINGTON — An independent report commissioned by the Indian Health Service found that officials at the federal agency silenced and punished whistle-blowers in an effort to protect a doctor who sexually abused boys on several Native American reservations for decades. At the same time, the report, written early last year but kept private until now, […]

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Oyster Shoreline at ‘Greater New York’ Has a Pearl of a Message

Michelson visits the Grand River at Six Nations Reserve, in southern Ontario, several times a year, where a younger sister and other relatives now live and where his grandparents grew up. Narratives of colonial subjugation and Indigenous survival form the backbone of some of his most powerful work. His “Two Row II” (2005), a monumental […]

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Book Review: ‘The Taking of Jemima Boone,’ by Matthew Pearl

There is no reason to question that the warriors treated the girls as well as they could under the circumstances, but the rumor that Hanging Maw was besotted with Boone’s daughter seems to be entirely a construct of white settler gossip in the published and unpublished sources consulted by Pearl. More revealing are the parallel […]

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Arizona’s Megadrought Tests the Hopi Tribe’s Resilience

MOENKOPI, Ariz. — On the bone-dry plateau where the Hopi people have lived for well over a thousand years, Robinson Honani pulled his truck to the side of a dirt road and pointed to a carcass. “This is where the cows come to die,” Mr. Honani, manager of the Hopi Office of Range Management, said […]

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