Tag: Medicine and Health

The Foot Soldiers in India’s Battle to Improve Public Health

BAGDOLI, India — A health worker was making her daily rounds in a village in the northern Indian state of Rajasthan when the husband of a woman with shooting labor pains ran up to her. For months, the health worker, Bhanwar Bai Jadoun, had been advising the woman to give birth at a hospital. But […]

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North Korea’s Covid Outbreak Continues to Worsen

North Korea said the number of suspected coronavirus infections in the vulnerable, isolated country was nearing 1.5 million on Tuesday and had resulted in 56 deaths since April. State media has for several days been reporting hundreds of thousands of new patients a day with fevers, without specifying how many of them had tested positive […]

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F.D.A. Moves to Ban Sales of Menthol Cigarettes

Though supporters of the ban say it is an important step toward reducing disease inequities in the United States, the step has, to some degree, divided Black communities. The Rev. Al Sharpton has sharply criticized it, and recently secured a meeting with White House officials along with King & Spalding, a lobbying firm with an […]

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Will the End of the Mask Mandate Hobble Our Response to the Next Pandemic?

In reality, the C.D.C. claims no power that Congress had not explicitly given it. An agency tasked with slowing the interstate spread of a highly infectious virus would regulate interstate travel, which occurs because “diverse places” like airplanes and train stations are often crowded, and passengers are confined for long periods of time. Under Judge […]

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The Drive to Vaccinate the World Against Covid Is Losing Steam

In the middle of last year, the World Health Organization began promoting an ambitious goal, one it said was essential for ending the pandemic: fully vaccinate 70 percent of the population in every country against Covid-19 by June 2022. Now, it is clear that the world will fall far short of that target by the […]

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Enough About Climate Change. Air Pollution Is Killing Us Now.

In the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic in 2020, doctors noticed a surprising silver lining: Americans were having fewer heart attacks. One likely reason, according to an analysis published last month by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, is that people were inhaling less air pollution. Millions of workers were staying home […]

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India Is Stalling the W.H.O.’s Efforts to Make Global Covid Death Toll Public

An ambitious effort by the World Health Organization to calculate the global death toll from the coronavirus pandemic has found that vastly more people died than previously believed — a total of about 15 million by the end of 2021, more than double the official total of six million reported by countries individually. But the […]

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Doctors, Attend to Your Mental Health

To the Editor: Re “Attack on Train Station Leaves Scores Dead” (front page, April 9): Since Russia launched its unprovoked, brutal assault on Ukraine we have seen attacks on civilian targets every day: residential neighborhoods, hospitals, schools, churches. Now we learn of the bombing of a train station used by civilians fleeing for their lives. […]

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What Is ‘Medical Gaslighting’ and How Can You Elevate Health Care

For instance, women with heart disease often have different symptoms from men with heart disease, yet doctors are much more familiar with the male symptoms, said Dr. Jennifer Mieres, a cardiologist with Northwell Health in New York. When “women show up with symptoms that don’t fit into the algorithm we’re taught in medical school,” she […]

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An E.R. Memoir Conveys Hectic Work, Empathy and Outrage

THE EMERGENCYA Year of Healing and Heartbreak in a Chicago ERBy Thomas Fisher254 pages. One World. $27. Thomas Fisher’s memoir, “The Emergency,” is about being an emergency room doctor on Chicago’s South Side; it’s a busy book about a busy man. The doors open, and in they flow: mostly poor patients with grease burns, heart […]

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Concussions Doctor Under Scrutiny in Plagiarism Scandal

But as the group’s impact grew, more of its members were supported by the sports leagues the group was meant to advise. Those relationships prompted critics to question whether the group could truly offer a rigorous and unbiased interpretation of the research on head trauma. “There’s no basis to say it’s a consensus, it’s a […]

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After Stumbles, Biden’s Health Secretary Seeks a Reboot

“Get ready, America,” he declared. “We’ve got your back.” Yet in interviews between stops, when asked about the challenges ahead, Mr. Becerra kept coming back to the pandemic. If Americans are ready to put it behind them, he is not. He said his department would “continue to push vaccination,” because that is the best way […]

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In Africa, a Mix of Shots Drives an Uncertain Covid Vaccination Push

But in most African countries there is far too little of everything — vaccines, and all of the equipment and trained people it takes to administer them — to envision a significant booster campaign now. At the vaccine headquarters in Kamakwie, the health workers are just trying to figure out how to use the supplies […]

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Review: “Empire of the Scalpel,” by Ira Rutkow

As Rutkow observes at the beginning of his book, it is a “reasonable certainty that no one in the industrialized world will escape having an illness for which effective treatment requires a surgical operation.” I myself would probably be blind in at least one eye (from retinal detachments), walk with a limp (from a complex […]

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Were These Doctors Treating Pain or Dealing Drugs?

In the last 15 years, as federal agents raided pill mills and prosecutions increased, the language around “legitimate medical purpose” and “professional practice” has been interpreted differently by different federal appellate courts. Those readings direct how a judge instructs a jury on what it must find to convict or acquit the prescriber. In a brief […]

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Jane Brody: Here’s How Health Advice Changed Since I Joined The Times

Surgery. Early in my career, radical mastectomy was the gold standard for treating breast cancer, and I recall saying that would be my choice if I got this disease. Little by little, through large, costly clinical trials, this body-deforming operation has been almost entirely replaced by early detection and minimal surgery, often followed by radiation […]

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The C.D.C. Isn’t Publishing Large Portions of the Covid Data It Collects

For more than a year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has collected data on hospitalizations for Covid-19 in the United States and broken it down by age, race and vaccination status. But it has not made most of the information public. When the C.D.C. published the first significant data on the effectiveness of […]

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How to Decide if You Should Still Wear a Mask

As masking mandates lift and new coronavirus infections fall across the United States, there’s lots of confusion about if, and when, to wear a mask. “This is the hardest thing of all, because it’s not just the risks and benefits to you,” said Dr. Robert Wachter, a professor and the chair of the medicine department […]

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Boris Johnson Outlines Plan for Lifting Covid Restrictions in England

Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain outlined plans on Wednesday to lift remaining coronavirus restrictions within weeks, including the legal requirement for those who test positive to isolate. Speaking in Parliament, Mr. Johnson — who is fighting to save his job after a scandal over lockdown parties — said he expected England’s last domestic pandemic […]

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Battling an Ancient Scourge

PHANTOM PLAGUEHow Tuberculosis Shaped HistoryBy Vidya Krishnan If only we had been willing to pay attention, nearly everything we needed to know to get through the Covid pandemic was right there before us. A pathogen that lodges in people’s airways and damages their lungs beyond repair naturally thrives in cramped and ill-ventilated quarters where the […]

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Wary Parents Are Target of New Appeals to Vaccinate Children 5-11

For weeks, the school principal had been imploring Kemika Cosey: Would she please allow her children, 7 and 11, to get Covid shots? Ms. Cosey remained firm. A hard no. But Mr. Kip — Brigham Kiplinger, the principal of Garrison Elementary School in Washington, D.C. — swatted away the “no’s.” Ever since the federal government […]

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Oura Ring 3 Review: A Missed Opportunity for Wearable Tech

Chris Becherer, Oura Health’s head of product, told me that the company was aware of the problem and researching a fix. He suggested that in the meantime, I could go back and delete workouts to inform the app that I wasn’t walking. This didn’t work. The app had permanently recorded my movements as walking, and […]

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Omicron Is (Still) Confusing. Two Experts Help Untangle the Covid Chaos.

Produced by ‘Sway’ With canceled plans, restaurants shuttering and talk of school shutdowns, the experience of the Covid pandemic can sometimes feel like two steps forward, one step back. And it’s not helped by changing (and sometimes confusing) guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the lack of key resources like at-home rapid […]

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Drinking Alcohol and Cancer: Should Your Cocktail Carry a Cancer Warning?

Scientists have known that alcohol promotes cancer for several decades. The World Health Organization first classified alcohol consumption as cancer-causing in 1987. Experts say that all types of alcoholic beverages can increase cancer risk because they all contain ethanol, which can cause DNA damage, oxidative stress and cell proliferation. Ethanol is metabolized by the body […]

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