Tag: Magazine

Pro-Trump Professors Are Plotting an Authoritarian Comeback

In searching for real-world alternatives, these intellectuals—especially the traditionalists—have looked abroad, latching on to Viktor Orbán’s Hungary as the best concrete example of their ideal. An open proponent of “illiberal democracy,” Orbán has become increasingly autocratic since he became the country’s prime minister in 2010, consolidating his power around staunch anti-immigration policies and Christian nationalism, […]

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Is the Pandemic Rewiring Kids’ Brains?

Kids’ difficulties today may affect their ability as adults to hold down jobs; they may get sick more easily and die younger. Some organizations are finding ways to provide mental health support to kids and their caregivers simultaneously. In Los Angeles, the mental health nonprofit Westside Infant-Family Network (WIN), which operates out of an office […]

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Puzzles: Interactive Crossword – Issue: October 29, 2021

Puzzles Issue: October 29, 2021 byThe Week Staff October 24, 2021 .polaris__post-meta–date { display: none; } .polaris__post-meta–date.no-script { display: block; padding-left: 45px } October 24, 2021 CROSSWORD – OCTOBER 29, 2021 ISSUE Continue Reading 1 Puzzles: Interactive Crossword – Issue: October 29, 2021 – currently reading 2 Puzzles: Printable Crossword and Sudoku – Issue: October […]

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The Week contest: No gas

This week’s question: Prince Charles has revealed that he uses white wine and cheese by-products as fuel for his vintage Aston Martin, saying the sports car “runs better and is more powerful” than when it used gasoline. If an automaker were to start selling a car powered by cheese and wine, what name should it give […]

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Red America’s Compassion Fatigue: A Report From Mobile, Alabama

Delta patients, it seemed, needed ICU-level care from the moment they entered the emergency room, said Tomlinson. Staff worried about the hospital’s oxygen supply, and whether the building’s infrastructure could handle running so many breathing machines at once. As soon as a Covid-19 ward was set up, it would fill, Tomlinson said. In one single […]

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Climate of Ignorance

Herodotus tells us that the massive Persian fleet sent to conquer Greece lost half its ships to a freak storm,” Gerard Baker advised in a column in The Wall Street Journal, the tutelary organ of the American business class, on August 9. The column appeared the same day the latest report of the Intergovernmental Panel […]

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The French Dispatch Is Wes Anderson’s Most Indulgent Fantasy

Visually, The French Dispatch is a smorgasbord—Anderson seems determined to outdo his previous efforts. There are gleeful references to Truffaut and other New Wave directors. Crowds run straight at the screen or flee away from it; the camera swings like a merry-go-round or is treated like a picture frame. The geometric tricks and perfections, the […]

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The Week contest: Mob phone

This week’s question: Old-school mafiosi are complaining that young mobsters are “soft” and issue threats and conduct other business by texting. “Everything is on the phones with them,” said a former member of the Colombo crime family. If Hollywood were to make a movie about a crime clan riven by intergenerational tensions over smartphone use, what […]

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Stephen Breyer’s Supreme Delusions

Breyer is clearest about one point of overriding importance: that it would be dreadful to abandon the line between politics and law, wherever that line is—and that those calling for political reform of a political institution are dangerous. The “highly nuanced” reality of judicial politicking, the justice writes, is at odds with the impression of […]

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They Gave Black Mothers in Mississippi $1,000 a Month. It Changed Their Lives.

Tamara Ware is used to getting calls offering financial advice from her community specialist, a social worker of sorts at Springboard to Opportunities, a nonprofit that provides support to the residents of the affordable housing complex where she lives in Jackson, Mississippi, with her three daughters. But one day in February 2020 she got a […]

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Why Norma McCorvey Switched Sides

Driven not by ideals so much as by pain and anger, Norma McCorvey was prone to outbursts, and frequently off message. Her conversion brought a lot of pain, especially for Gonzales, as McCorvey, over time, began to profess that homosexuality now appalled her and “that she herself had never really been gay.” But perhaps no […]

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Jonathan Franzen, America’s Next Top Moralist

Crossroads brings back the mystery and dispenses with many of the manners. While the characters sport painter’s pants and long hair, and occasionally allude to “women’s lib” and Gloria Steinem, the novel doesn’t investigate the social world of the 1970s. Franzen has shifted his attention to more existential concerns: How can people be good if they’re […]

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The Danish “Skeptical Environmentalist” Beloved by American Conservatives

Throughout September, as the United Nations climate summit in Glasgow approached, The Wall Street Journal ran a series of opinion articles by Bjorn Lomborg, a notorious climate “skeptic” from Denmark who has downplayed the threat of global warming. The articles purported to offer readers “a better understanding of the true effects of climate change and […]

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Biden’s Questionable Pick for Drug Czar

“The report was incredibly damaging,” says Laura Jones, who runs a free clinic in Morgantown, a city a few hours north of Charleston. “It laid the groundwork for the situation today.” Over the last year, the Biden administration has promised to lead the American people based on science, a reenvisioning of political life that Gupta […]

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Lab to Table

The Center for Food Safety, a watchdog group, filed an unsuccessful lawsuit last year alleging that the FDA had been too quick to deem soy leghemoglobin (“heme”)—the ingredient that makes Impossible’s almost entirely plant-based burgers “bleed”—safe to eat under its existing rules on additives. The company Perfect Day was able to bring its animal-free whey […]

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The Apolitical Passivity of “Inclusion”

Students returning to Harvard this fall may encounter the Office for Diversity, Inclusion, & Belonging, whose mission is to “catalyze, convene, and build capacity for equity, diversity, inclusion, belonging, and anti-racism initiatives .” They might wonder at the difference between “catalyzing” and “convening”; they might ask how much equity you could catalyze just by cutting […]

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Charlie Kirk’s Sick Logic

At the height of the summer, as a number of prominent Republican politicians urged their constituents to take the Covid-19 vaccine, one right-wing media personality refused to fall in line: Charlie Kirk, a pundit in his late twenties who leads the conservative campus-outreach group Turning Point USA. “At Turning Point … we are going to […]

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Nevada’s Blue Wave

The law’s passage followed intense lobbying pressure by the Culinary Union, the influential labor group that represents more than 60,000 hospitality workers in Las Vegas and Reno. Geoconda Argüello-Kline, the group’s secretary-treasurer, told me that the law reflected a moral responsibility toward the community by the hospitality industry. While some major business groups withdrew their […]

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The Afterlives of E.M. Forster

Di Canzio’s descriptions of their experiences are harrowing, tender, brutal, and comic. A favorite scene is when Alec visits the legendary Parisian brothel, Le Chabanais, while on leave, and encounters pure lust in a way he hasn’t before, as well as the truth of the late King Edward VII’s preferences. He believes he is haunted […]

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Richard Powers’s Bewilderment Is an Exercise in Empathy

What was there to explain? Synthetic clothing gave him hideous eczema. His classmates harassed him for not understanding their vicious gossip. His mother was crushed to death when he was seven. His beloved dog died of confusion a few months later. What more reason for disturbed behavior did any doctor need? Theo crusades against placing […]

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How Does Don Jr. Roll?

The company’s own sales pitch to win the lease described a well-maintained building that needed little more than a paint job for the agencies to move in. But Chicora embarked on a renovation that unleashed asbestos, according to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and environmental assessments done by the county, and demolished multiple floors […]

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