Tag: Labor and Jobs

Public Displays of Resignation: Saying ‘I Quit’ Loud and Proud

For Gabby Ianniello, it was the blisters from putting on stilettos every morning for her real estate job, which had called employees back to the office last fall. For Giovanna Gonzalez, it was those three little letters, R.T.O., coming from her investment management boss. For Tiffany Knighten, it was finding out that a teammate’s annual […]

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November 2021 Jobs Report: A Gain of 210,000

Employers recorded the year’s weakest hiring in November, adding only 210,000 jobs on a seasonally adjusted basis, the Labor Department said Friday. Economists had expected the number to be above half a million for the second straight month. The shortfall was particularly stark given that the data was collected before the emergence of the Omicron […]

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Why the Fed Chair Won’t Call Inflation ‘Transitory’ Anymore

Jerome Powell, the Federal Reserve chair, picked an interesting time to banish “transitory” from his vocabulary. All year he has been describing the rise in inflation as transitory — five times in a single speech in August, for example. On Tuesday he publicly changed his mind, telling the Senate Banking Committee that it was “probably […]

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Why the November Jobs Report Is Better Than It Looks

Everything in the November jobs numbers Friday was good except for the number that usually gets the most attention. The 210,000 jobs that U.S. employers added last month was far below analyst expectations. But most of the other evidence in the report points to a job market that is humming. An open question a few […]

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November Jobs Report Shows Workers Remain Optimistic

For many economists, the American labor market remains a puzzle. The November jobs report, released on Friday by the Labor Department, shows that the unemployment rate edged down to 4.2 percent and is getting closer to its level before the pandemic. The number of nonfarm payroll jobs rose by 210,000, disappointing expectations of a more […]

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A Top Official Says the Fed Will ‘Grapple’ With a Faster Bond-Buying Taper

John C. Williams, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, said the latest variant of the coronavirus could prolong the bottlenecks and shortages that have caused inflation to run hotter than expected, and is a risk Fed officials will assess as they “grapple” with how quickly to remove economic support. It is still […]

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A Top Official Says the Fed Will ‘Grapple’ With Faster Bond-Buying Taper

John C. Williams, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, said the latest variant of the coronavirus could prolong the bottlenecks and shortages that have caused inflation to run hotter than expected, and is a risk Fed officials will assess as they “grapple” with how quickly to remove economic support. It is still […]

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Amazon and the Labor Shortage

Karen Weise contributed reporting. The Daily is made by Lisa Tobin, Rachel Quester, Lynsea Garrison, Clare Toeniskoetter, Paige Cowett, Michael Simon Johnson, Brad Fisher, Larissa Anderson, Chris Wood, Jessica Cheung, Stella Tan, Alexandra Leigh Young, Lisa Chow, Eric Krupke, Marc Georges, Luke Vander Ploeg, M.J. Davis Lin, Austin Mitchell, Neena Pathak, Dan Powell, Dave Shaw, […]

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India’s Economy Still Weak, Despite a Strong Third Quarter

These are the kind of people who would normally be traveling to Italy, London or the United States to celebrate their holidays there, said Wilson Dass, a store manager at The Collective, a high-end chain selling items like cashmere overcoats and expensive leather bags. Instead, they are coming to his store, in the industrial hub […]

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Why Retired Subway Workers Are Getting $35,000 to Come Back

In New York, the M.T.A. lifted a hiring freeze for certain workers in February after federal pandemic relief stabilized the agency’s finances and has made tackling crew shortages a priority. Still, the staffing shortages continue to cause thousands of subway and bus trips to be canceled every month, frustrating riders and hobbling the agency’s efforts […]

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What Europe Can Teach Us About Jobs

Americans have a hard time learning from foreign experience. Our size and the role of English as an international language (which reduces our incentive to learn other tongues) conspire to make us oblivious to alternative ways of living and the possibilities of change. Our insularity may be especially damaging when it comes to countries with […]

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Amazon Union Vote in Alabama Is a Step Closer to Being Overturned

A regional office of the National Labor Relations Board on Monday ordered a new election at an Amazon warehouse in Alabama where workers opposed a union in a vote earlier this year two to one. The office’s order, confirmed by a spokeswoman for the labor board, was widely expected after a hearing officer recommended in […]

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Years of Delays, Billions in Overruns: The Dismal History of Big Infrastructure

“In the world of civic projects, the first budget is really just a down payment,” he wrote in a guest newspaper column in 2013. “If people knew the real cost from the start, nothing would ever be approved. The idea is to get going. Start digging a hole and make it so big there’s no […]

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Supply Chain Shortages Help a North Carolina Furniture Town

HICKORY, N.C. — Six months into the coronavirus pandemic, as millions of workers lost their jobs and companies fretted about their economic future, something unexpected happened at Hancock & Moore, a purveyor of custom-upholstered leather couches and chairs in this small North Carolina town. Orders began pouring in. Families stuck at home had decided to […]

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Initial unemployment claims last week fell to a half-century low.

Initial unemployment claims tumbled last week to their lowest point since 1969, the Labor Department reported Wednesday. New filings for state benefits totaled 199,000 on a seasonally adjusted basis, a decline of 71,000 from the previous week. The drop marks a milestone in the economy’s recovery from the pandemic. Weekly claims peaked at more than […]

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For Afghan Refugees, a Choice Between Community and Opportunity

FREMONT, Ca. — Harris Mojadedi’s parents fled Afghanistan’s communist revolution four decades ago and arrived as refugees in this San Francisco suburb in 1986, lured by the unlikely presence of a Farsi-speaking doctor and a single Afghan grocery store. Over the decades, as more refugees settled in Fremont, the eclectic neighborhood became known as Little […]

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Volkswagen C.E.O. Herbert Diess Sets Sights on Beating Tesla

WOLFSBURG, Germany — In July, when Herbert Diess, Volkswagen’s chief executive, wanted to congratulate the company for a strong first half of the year, he posted a video of himself zipping across a waterway at the company’s headquarters in Wolfsburg on an electric hydrofoil, delivering a message of thanks to VW’s roughly 200,000 workers. “I […]

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Wall Street Warms Up, Grudgingly, to Remote Work, Unthinkable Before Covid

In private, many senior bank executives tasked with raising attendance among their direct reports expressed irritation. They said it was unfair for highly paid employees to keep working from home while others — like bank tellers or building workers — dutifully come in every day. Salaries at investment banks in the New York area averaged […]

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Overheating the Economy Now Could Mean Trouble Later

Instead, Mr. Powell should immediately take tougher action to fight inflation. Rather than slowly reducing its purchases of mortgage-backed securities, given the white-hot housing market, the Fed should immediately stop buying them. It should aim to eliminate all additional asset purchases by the time Fed officials hold their March meeting, not June. In addition, the […]

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Biden Bets Big on Continuity at the Fed

In the end, President Biden bet that the leaders of the Federal Reserve could finish what they started. Jerome Powell, who will be reappointed Monday as head of the central bank, and Lael Brainard, a Fed governor newly nominated to be his No. 2, had steered the economy from the depths of the pandemic to […]

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The Searing Beauty, and Harsh Reality, of a Kentucky Tobacco Harvest

I step into the tobacco field as the first rays of sunlight begin to pierce the early-morning fog. The men of the cutting crew are already hard at work harvesting the tall burley tobacco plants that have taken root in the soil over the past few months. The sound of hatchets resonates across the field: […]

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Remote Work Is Failing Gen Z Employees

The first week of remote work, Joe’s supervisor canceled their check-in without rescheduling a new one. “We went months without emailing over the rest of the fellowship, and we only spoke on the phone once over that time, and weren’t in any meetings together,” he said. On his last day, there was no exit interview […]

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Solutions for the Shortage of Truck Drivers

As the article notes, only 7 percent of truckers are women. A way to grow the field of truckers is recruiting and retaining more women drivers. A report by Time’sUp Foundation and the Institute for Women’s Policy Research shows that sexual harassment can flourish in isolated, male-dominated fields such as trucking, pushing women out of […]

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The Case Against Loving Your Job

Produced by ‘The Ezra Klein Show’ The compulsion to be happy at work “is always a demand for emotional work from the worker,” writes Sarah Jaffe. “Work, after all, has no feelings. Capitalism cannot love. This new work ethic, in which work is expected to give us something like self-actualization, cannot help but fail.” [You […]

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Joe Biden’s Infrastructure Bill Is a Big Success

Joe Biden came to the White House at a pivotal moment in American history. We had become a country dividing into two nations, one highly educated and affluent and the other left behind. The economic gaps further inflamed cultural and social gaps, creating an atmosphere of intense polarization, cultural hostility, alienation, bitterness and resentment. As […]

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Striking Deere Workers Approve a New Contract on the Third Try

About 10,000 workers at the agriculture equipment maker Deere & Company will go back to work after the approval of a contract on Wednesday, bringing to an end a five-week strike that affected 14 facilities primarily in Iowa and Illinois. The six-year contract was ratified, 61 percent to 39 percent, after workers voted down two […]

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Cities Try to Lure Factories as U.S. Pushes to Fix Chip Shortage

TAYLOR, Texas — The shortage of computer chips has zapped energy from the global economy, punishing industries as varied as automakers and medical device manufacturers and contributing to fears about high inflation. But many states and cities in America are starting to see a silver lining: the possibility that efforts to sharply increase chip production […]

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The Pandemic Prompted People to Retire Early. Will They Return to Work?

Retirement isn’t always forever. Over the course of a business cycle, about 20 percent of people are working within 12 months after they first report being retired, according to calculations by Goldman Sachs. The question now is how many people who took early retirement because of the Covid-19 pandemic will return to work. Will it […]

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The Supply-Chain Crisis Is a Labor Crisis

From Los Angeles to Felixstowe, England; to Dubai, United Arab Emirates; to Shenzhen, China, the world is witnessing delays and shortages of everything from toys to turkeys. At the root of this crisis is a transport sector that is buckling under the strain of Covid-era conditions. Workers who drive the trucks, fly the planes and […]

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The Worst of Both Worlds: Zooming From the Office

For months, the putt-putt course sat unused. The beanbag chairs lay empty. The kitchen whiteboard, above where the keg used to live, displayed in fading marker “Beers on Tap” from a happy hour in March 2020. But on a recent weekday, over in the common area was a sign of life — fresh bagels. As […]

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