Tag: June 2021

Octavia Butler Wanted to Write a “Yes” Book

Other problems require physical self-defense. Good Ina elders respect their human symbionts; they make “good teachers,” too. Bad ones treat humans as “tools,” and will stop at very little to erase Shori, the human-Ina hybrid, from the earth. The bad clans perpetrate more arson, more murders, as our heroes flee. Determined to “do what’s necessary […]

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The Climate Case for Property Destruction

To rebuke this reading of history, Malm examines the use of violence and property destruction in a series of emancipatory movements. These range from the mass liberation of slaves in the Haitian Revolution of the late eighteenth century, through the suffragette struggle of the early twentieth (“Fed up with their own fruitless deputations to Parliament, […]

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The Professor Who Became a Cop

Journalists can become “so coppish themselves,” H.L. Mencken remarked in 1931, that they function as “police fans.” “So maybe it was all to do with my childhood,” wonders Brooks, “and the muddled, conflicted messages about authority, gender, and class I absorbed from the adults around me, my mother most of all.” The lessons are muddled […]

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China Is Proud of Its Covid Response. But Taiwan’s Was Better.

Implicit in the party’s official telling is the premise that tolerant, democratic governance will result in American-style chaos. In Washington, partisans traded barbs over face masks, social distancing, lockdowns, quarantines, school reopenings, state subsidies, supply rations, medical treatments, and relief checks—a parade of embarrassments that showed, again and again, their own political interest was more […]

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Why “Social Justice” Triggers Conservatives

“Social justice” might seem, at first, like a perfectly innocuous phrase, safe enough for brands like Aflac, Mountain Dew, Disney, and Pizza Hut to use in their public statements about racism and diversity. After George Floyd’s death, the pizza chain announced that it would “stand against oppression” and donate $3 million to “social justice efforts.” […]

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The Other Black Girl Reinvents the Office Novel

Nella’s doubts underscore a consequence of office life for some Black women: the slow erosion of confidence and mistrust in your own sanity. To be Black in America, W.E.B Du Bois theorized, is to live in the shadow of white America and to measure oneself against the standards of the oppressor; to be both Black […]

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A Holocaust Documentary Interviews the Perpetrators

What atrocities a human being is capable of and the psychic torments she might or might not suffer in consequence are, to a disturbing degree, social questions. In Joshua Oppenheimer’s disorienting 2012 documentary, The Act of Killing, a group of Indonesian gangsters reminisce in fond tones about the mass rape, torture, and murder they committed […]

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A New “War on Terrorism” Is the Wrong Way to Fight Domestic Extremists

Gebert’s case presents its own challenges, but his ability to retain a top-secret security clearance raises serious concerns about the process by which investigations are carried out. It’s especially worrying given that some members of the national security infrastructure have suggested such exhaustive background checks as a means of rooting out far-right extremists in the […]

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A New “War on Terrorism” Is the Wrong Way to Fight Domestic Extremists

Gebert’s case presents its own challenges, but his ability to retain a top-secret security clearance raises serious concerns about the process by which investigations are carried out. It’s especially worrying given that some members of the national security infrastructure have suggested such exhaustive background checks as a means of rooting out far-right extremists in the […]

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Can a Hate Crimes Bill Stop the Rising Violence Against Asian Americans?

According to the research group Stop AAPI Hate, during the first year of the pandemic, there were nearly 3,800 reports of harassment, physical assault, and civil rights violations against Asian Americans across the country, from the killing of a Thai grandfather in San Francisco to an attack on an 89-year-old Chinese woman who was set […]

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Our 250-Year Fight for Multiracial Democracy

Every nation visualizes its history within certain periods. English historians usually rely on their monarchies to define time; they refer to Tudor England, Regency England, and Victorian England. In France, everything before 1789 is considered l’ancien régime, followed then by the Revolution, then a number of republics and empires. (They are currently on “republic” for […]

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Are Liberal Cities Turning Against Their Progressive Prosecutors?

Law professor Jonathan Simon characterizes the turn to law and order politics as “governing through crime.” A society in which the government claims to do less and less to promote health, education, and social welfare simultaneously outsources more and more authority to the police. By the 1990s, the government that ended welfare as we knew […]

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Democracy’s Moment of Reckoning

Ed Espinoza, executive director of the progressive communications firm Progress Texas, agreed. “It’s always tough to mobilize people in Texas because of the laws that are here,” he said. The state is one of only nine that don’t have online voter registration. “That’s the first barrier—that you’ve actually got to either find a card somewhere […]

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The Undefeated

In any Hemingway short story or novel, whether it is filtered through a first- or third-person narrator, there is really only one perspective presented, one voice: that of the author. Whether it is Nick Adams, or Jake Barnes, or Lieutenant Henry, or an elderly Cuban fisherman, it is the perceptions of Hemingway himself that you […]

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