Tag: internal-sub-only

Gas Prices Are Up in the U.S. Don’t Blame the President.

“Democracy,” Winston Churchill declared, “is the worst form of government except for all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.” But how bad is it? Looking at public opinion right now, it’s hard to escape the impression that it’s very bad indeed. In principle, voters should judge politicians by their actions; […]

Read More

Aaron Rodgers’ and Mehmet Oz’s Irresponsible Choices

And this commentary on Glenn Youngkin’s victory in the Virginia governor’s race by Ron Charles: “Throughout the campaign Youngkin promised to ban critical race theory in schools, even though critical race theory is not taught in Virginia schools. It’s as if Youngkin won by pledging to serve only gluten-free apples in the cafeteria.” (Karen Roberts, […]

Read More

A World Running on Empty

It’s been a troubled few months on the economic front. Inflation has soared to a 28-year high. Supermarket shelves are bare, and gas stations closed. Good luck if you’re having problems with your home heating system: Replacing your boiler, which normally takes 48 hours, now takes two or three months. President Biden really is messing […]

Read More

Colombians Are Uniting Around Land Reform. Here’s Why.

Officially owning a piece of land gives a rural family wealth, which can be used as an inheritance or as collateral for a loan. Property owners are less likely to fall under the sway of revolutionary Marxist groups, such as FARC: “People with nothing to lose are trapped in the grubby basement of the precapitalist […]

Read More

How Tweeting Can Be Like Pro Wrestling, and Other Observations

(Disclosure: I’m working on a podcast about the show “Succession” for HBO, which has aired programming featuring Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson and André the Giant.) 4 Questions This week I spoke with Max Chafkin, an editor at Bloomberg Businessweek and the author of a new biography of the tech mogul Peter Thiel called “The Contrarian: […]

Read More

Go See These Black Operas

But this requires, again, doing the work. The story, based on the best-selling memoir of my New York Times colleague, the columnist Charles Blow, is indeed “arresting.” The fraternity step-show sequence is as electrifying as the word around town has noted. But even though Blanchard infuses the music with aspects of blues and jazz in […]

Read More

Vaccine Mandates Could Stop Supply-Chain Woes at U.S. Ports

It’s 7:38 a.m. on a Tuesday — specifically today, Oct. 19, 2021 — and you’re taking a taxi from Kennedy Airport to The New York Times building. If you’d taken that ride very early this morning, when there was no traffic, it would have taken less than half an hour. But during today’s morning commute […]

Read More

Some Tenants in Los Angeles May Lose the City Councilwoman They Elected

You might assume that given Park La Brea’s numbers — it is home, after all, to 12,000 residents — it wouldn’t be at risk of losing political influence. But organizing these voters to turn out can be challenging. Homeowners will always have a set of advantages over renters: They stay in the same place for […]

Read More

College Degrees Are Overrated

Now the software contractor avoids client dinners. “They think ‘inclusion’ as a message backfires, and want to be judged by contract/technical performance alone,” Auguste wrote in a follow-up email. There are solutions, Auguste says, and the first one is to do less. That is, less screening out of candidates just because they lack a bachelor’s […]

Read More

A Home Built for the Next Pandemic

The dual fridge The Covid concept home reflected the idea that American middle-class families need to stockpile food and supplies. The home has two full-size modern refrigerators, one in the kitchen, and one just off the kitchen, in the laundry room. Second fridges are not uncommon in American homes, but they have not been thought […]

Read More

Chappelle’s Netflix Show Just Isn’t Funny

We saw a record number of violent deaths suffered by trans and gender-nonconforming people in 2020. And there is a spate of truly appalling bills in states across the country aimed at the trans community. (You can listen to my “Sway” episode with the A.C.L.U. lawyer Chase Strangio about that here, as well as my […]

Read More

A Blackface Scandal at Michigan

Last year, not long after George Floyd was murdered, three “30 Rock” episodes that involved blackface, including those two, were taken out of syndication. The show’s producers, including its star, Tina Fey, may have concluded they had no choice. But we might ask why the sheer matter of the makeup was an insult to Black […]

Read More

Don’t Blame Workers for Inflation

Inflation is up and wages are up. Average hourly earnings for production and nonsupervisory workers rose 5.5 percent in the 12 months through September, which was the most since 1982, except for a few other months of the pandemic. But don’t blame rising wages for inflation. I have two charts that demonstrate that workers are […]

Read More

The Fed Shouldn’t Make a Call on Inflation Yet

What’s happening to inflation? We know, of course, what the current numbers say: Inflation is high right now, although not 1970s high. But is this a blip or the beginning of a longer-term problem? Economists are deeply divided. I’m basically for the former, on what has come to be known as Team Transitory, but I […]

Read More

Soccer’s Problem With Silver Medals

That is indisputable, of course, and it was very much the logic adopted by Ashley, but it has always struck me as a false parallel. There is no conclusive proof, as far as I am aware, of teams that take the domestic cups seriously being relegated more frequently. There is not even a compelling body […]

Read More

What You Need to Know About the Latest Aspirin Recommendations

For years, many doctors have recommended that people in their 50s start taking a low-dose aspirin every day to protect heart health and, more recently, to prevent colon cancer. So it was a shock this week when an independent panel made recommendations to curb aspirin use. But don’t throw out your aspirin bottle just yet. […]

Read More

California Homeowners Flex Their Political Muscle

Some may roll their eyes at the thought that a coalition of mostly affluent homeowners could qualify as “grass roots,” a term more commonly associated with social justice movements. But they would be wrong: Throughout his four-decade reign, Close and SOHA have consistently out-organized, out-hustled and outmaneuvered their political opponents. In the 1980s, Close and […]

Read More

Where Biden Is Most Vulnerable

There are political and civic virtues aplenty in centrism, including its pushback against extreme partisanship and its promise of a less vicious and perpetual seesaw. But there’s also literary virtue in Ryan Cooper’s description, in The Week, of a certain vague, noncommittal type of it, which he locates in Kyrsten Sinema: “This is political ‘centrism’ […]

Read More

Can Hollywood Adapt to Streaming?

When it comes to entertainment, viewers are increasingly using a range of digital tools, from mobile phones to large televisions with on-demand service, that don’t include movie theaters. My own teen sons leap from one device to the next effortlessly, but could not be coaxed into going to the theater last weekend, even though I […]

Read More

Controversial Words You Can Use

Do we really think “honestly” is a waste? In his classic analysis of how speaking works, the philosopher H.P. Grice taught that conversation is founded on being informative, truthful, relevant and clear. Those points may seem too obvious to be listed as new information. But the full humanity of language gets interesting once we understand […]

Read More

Inside Republicans’ Policy Rift With Corporate America

Big business is overwhelmingly in favor of requiring that workers get vaccinated against Covid-19. A recent CNBC survey of chief financial officers found that 80 percent of them say they “totally support” the Biden administration’s plan to impose a vaccine-or-test mandate on companies with more than 100 workers, and many companies have already announced vaccination […]

Read More

Will a Global Minimum Tax End the Tax Haven Race to the Bottom?

Economics professors like to stage a fun competition with their students to introduce them to game theory. It goes like this: Everyone picks a number between zero and 100, and the winner is the person whose choice is closest to two-thirds of the average choice. If you think about it, the winning choice can’t be […]

Read More

How to Help Kids Process the Trauma of Covid

My extroverted eight-year-old who loves school, people and laughter more than anyone I know began to wither under the isolation of Covid. She started voicing fear and anxiety in ways she never had before. This was heartbreaking to me as a mom, but the impulse to rescue her from the real trials the pandemic presented […]

Read More

Trouble Comes for Big Tech

Could Jonathan Kanter have better timing? I hardly think so, given the lovefest on display this week at his Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. Nominated to lead the Justice Department’s antitrust division, the decidedly tough-on-tech Kanter spoke to lawmakers just as Facebook was getting a shellacking by the persuasive whistle-blower Frances Haugen. Meanwhile, the social media […]

Read More

The Team Heard Round the World

Earlier this summer, Kansas Republicans attacked the state’s Democratic governor for purportedly not taking border security seriously, despite Topeka being slightly closer to the U.S. border with Canada than it is to the Mexican border. (I assume, of course, that that’s not the border of which they spoke.) Local and state-level politicians often take actions […]

Read More

Wonking Out: Coins and Credibility

Franklin Roosevelt took the United States off the gold standard soon after his inauguration as president in 1933. It was an essential move: The nation was in the midst of a banking crisis, and to end that crisis the Federal Reserve needed the freedom to print money as needed. But even some of Roosevelt’s own […]

Read More

Bill Clinton, Race and the Politics of the 1990s

My colleague Ezra Klein wrote his latest column on the work of David Shor, a Democratic polling analyst whose primary message is a critique of the Democratic Party, namely that its college-educated professional class is too removed from the working-class, non-college-educated voters they need to win. Here’s Ezra with a little more detail: The Democratic […]

Read More