Tag: Indigenous People

2 Canadian Journalists Arrested at Indigenous Protest Are Freed on Bail

OTTAWA — Two journalists arrested at an Indigenous protest against a pipeline last week in western Canada were released Monday on bail, but journalism groups in the country condemned the decision to continue with contempt charges against them. Amber Bracken, who is a photographer, and a filmmaker, Michael Toledano, were arrested Friday as they covered […]

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A Thanksgiving History Lesson, in a Handful of Corn

These goals are part of an attempt to revive the deep, almost symbiotic relationship between corn and humans. “For Native people, it’s not just about growing out the corn and bringing it back home,” Mrs. Greendeer said. “It’s about creating a spiritual connection and relationship with this being, the corn. She’s alive. So the goal […]

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In Mexico, an Indigenous Women’s Softball Team Breaks Barriers

A Mayan team from a small community on the Yucatán Peninsula has caused a sensation by excelling as its athletes play barefoot and wear traditional dresses, breaking barriers with every game. By Adam Williams Photographs by Marian Carrasquero Nov. 17, 2021 HONDZONOT, Mexico — Playing barefoot and wearing traditional Mayan dresses known as huipiles, the […]

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Lee Maracle, Combative Indigenous Author, Dies at 71

That sort of change has begun to take place across Canada. In recent years, the government has established an official investigation into missing or murdered Indigenous women. It has also created a Truth and Reconciliation Commission focused on the estimated 150,000 Indigenous children who were separated from their families to attend assimilationist residential schools, the […]

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Will Indonesia Edge Its Way into the Space Race?

BIAK, Indonesia — For 15 generations, members of the Abrauw clan have lived much like their ancestors. They farm with wooden plows in patches of the rainforest, gather medicinal plants and set traps to catch snakes and wild boar. The land they occupy on Biak island is everything to them: their identity, the source of […]

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Marking a Different Thanksgiving Tradition, From West Africa

On a pivotal day in July, a nation declared its independence. Years later, it set aside a day in November to celebrate Thanksgiving. But while some of that new republic’s inhabitants had connections to the United States, its birth year wasn’t 1776, but 1847. The country was named Liberia by its founders, formerly enslaved Africans […]

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The Climate Summit Has Me Very Energized, and Very Afraid

I spent last week talking to all sorts of people gathered for the U.N. climate summit in Glasgow, and it left me with profoundly mixed emotions. Having been to most of the climate summits since Bali in 2007, I can tell you this one had a very different feel. I was awed by the energy […]

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An Indigenous Canadian Director Channels Traumatic Memories Into Film

Although Beans’ struggles relate specifically to her time and place, they are likely to resonate with anyone who has raised an adolescent — or been one. When Beans practices profanity in front of her bedroom mirror, smiling proudly when she finally utters a curse, it’s impossible not to notice the doll and stuffed animals still […]

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The Glasgow Deforestation Pledge Isn’t Enough to Save Our Forests

The 2015 Paris climate agreement called on nations of the world to preserve forests and other ecosystems that store carbon. But forests continue to disappear — cut and burned and fragmented into ever smaller patches. This failure challenges all of our other climate efforts because unless forests remain standing, the world will never contain global […]

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As Earth Warms, Human History Is Melting Away

To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android. For the past few centuries, the Yup’ik peoples of Alaska have told gruesome tales of a massacre that occurred during the Bow and Arrow War Days, a series of long and often brutal battles across the Bering […]

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Global Leaders Pledge to End Deforestation by 2030

Leaders of more than 100 countries, including Brazil, China and the United States, vowed on Monday at climate talks in Glasgow to end deforestation by 2030, seeking to preserve critical forests that can absorb carbon dioxide and slow the rise in global warming. The pledge will demand “transformative further action,” the countries’ declaration said, and […]

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Lawyer Who Won $9.5 Billion Settlement Against Chevron Reports to Prison

Steven Donziger, the environmental and human rights lawyer who won a $9.5 billion settlement against Chevron over oil dumped in Indigenous lands in the Amazon rainforest, surrendered himself to the federal authorities on Wednesday to begin a six-month prison sentence. Mr. Donziger was found guilty in July of six counts of criminal contempt of court […]

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Pope Expresses ‘Willingness’ to Visit Canada for Indigenous Reconciliation

ROME — The Vatican announced Wednesday that Pope Francis had “indicated his willingness” to visit Canada, after Indigenous leaders in the country had repeatedly demanded he apologize for the church’s role in residential schools. In a brief statement, the Vatican said that Canada’s bishops had invited Francis “in the context of the longstanding pastoral process […]

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Justin Trudeau Introduces ‘Reinvigorated’ Cabinet

OTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau unveiled his new cabinet on Tuesday, in a muted inauguration during which the Canadian leader laid out a sweeping agenda meant to reinvigorate support for his Liberal Party after an underwhelming and unpopular early election in September. The swearing-in ceremony, dampened by pandemic restrictions and a chilly autumnal rain, […]

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The Lummi Nation’s Secret to Saving Fragile Ecosystems

One afternoon this August, I boarded the Salish Sea, a crabbing boat named after the inland ocean that gives the Washington State coastline its defining divot. Dana Culaxten Wilson, one of the most prolific fishers in the Lummi Nation, and his crew of two were on their final outing of a 30-hour “crab opening,” a […]

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Ancient-DNA Researchers Set Ethical Guidelines for Their Work

The authors of the new paper intentionally chose to invite only active practitioners of ancient DNA research, according to Kendra Sirak, a paleogeneticist at Harvard Medical School and one of the authors. They also emphasize that these guidelines come from a particular group of scholars in the ancient DNA community. “We realized that what’s lacking […]

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Mexico City Replaces a Statue of Columbus With One of an Indigenous Woman

MEXICO CITY — Statues of Columbus are being toppled across the Americas, amid fierce debates over the region’s legacy of European conquest and colonialism. Few have been more contentious than the replacement of a monument at the heart of Mexico’s capital, touching on some of the most intense disputes in the country’s current politics, including […]

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A New Cookbook by Indigenous People, for Indigenous People

The chiltepin is a tiny, powerfully spicy chile that’s the genetic grandparent of nearly every chile varietal cultivated in the United States. It’s a living emblem of how Indigenous ingredients formed the bedrock of American foodways. But the history of the chiltepin — and that of the Indigenous people in the Southwest who grow it […]

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What is Indigenous Peoples’ Day?

Are there closures for the day? The United States Postal Service and post offices will be closed in observation of Columbus Day, as will most banks. Most government offices and libraries will be closed. Stores like Walmart and Target and most grocery stores are open. In some cities, like New York, trash and recycling collection […]

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Coroner Finds Racism Played Part in Indigenous Woman’s Death

MONTREAL — It was a case that shook Canada: A 37-year-old Indigenous mother of seven died in a Quebec hospital last year after a nurse had taunted her, “You’re stupid as hell,” only good at having sex, and “better off dead.” On Tuesday, a coroner said that the death of the woman, Joyce Echaquan, could […]

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The World Wants Greenland’s Minerals, but Greenlanders Are Wary

The island has rare elements needed for electric cars and wind turbines. But protesters are blocking one project, signaling that mining companies must tread carefully. By Jack Ewing Photographs by Carsten Snejbjerg Oct. 1, 2021 NARSAQ, Greenland — This huge, remote and barely habited island is known for frozen landscapes, remote fjords and glaciers that […]

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Intimate Portraits of Mexico’s Third-Gender Muxes

Estrella has long, wavy, jet-back hair. She tries to tame it with a thick-toothed comb in the backyard of her house, among the chickens, hammocks and looms. All around her, relatives come and go. It is November 2015, and Estrella is preparing for the annual festival called La Vela de las Auténticas Intrépidas Buscadoras del […]

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