Tag: Holocaust and the Nazi Era

How Éric Zemmour Became the New Face of France’s Far Right

He has also revised the history of the Dreyfus Affair. Mr. Zemmour says that the French General Staff, where Dreyfus was posted and from which he was supposed to have stolen documents, was justified in suspecting Dreyfus of espionage because he was a German. This is false. More outrageous, though, is his claim that both […]

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Justus Rosenberg, Beloved Professor With a Heroic Past, Dies at 100

“Gussie,” she told him, “I’ve got a job for you.” Ms. Davenport had recently rendezvoused with Varian Fry, who was sent to Europe by the Emergency Rescue Committee, a group of New York intellectuals who wanted to help cultural figures stranded in Vichy France. Mr. Fry arrived with a list of names and Eleanor Roosevelt’s […]

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For a 96-Year-Old Veteran, the Parade Came to Him

Jack Le Vine did not march in the big Veterans Day parade up Fifth Avenue in Manhattan on Thursday, or attend the small service at the Brooklyn War Memorial. He spent the day on the block in Brooklyn where he was born, in the two-story brick-faced house with American flags out front and photos in […]

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On Veterans Day, the Parade Came to Him

Jack Le Vine did not march in the big Veterans Day parade up Fifth Avenue in Manhattan on Thursday, or attend the small service at the Brooklyn War Memorial. He spent the day on the block in Brooklyn where he was born, in the two-story brick-faced house with American flags out front and photos in […]

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Holocaust Scholar to Testify at Charlottesville Trial

WASHINGTON — Deborah E. Lipstadt, a renowned Holocaust scholar, was not in Charlottesville, Va., in August 2017 when torch-bearing neo-Nazi marchers chanted “Jews will not replace us” and a young woman was killed in the violence. And yet Dr. Lipstadt is to take the stand in the continuing trial, where she will testify as a […]

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A Jewish Far-Right Pundit Splits the French Jewish Community as He Rises

The reference was to Mr. Lévy’s passionate stand over decades for oppressed people from countries like Afghanistan, Bosnia and Nigeria, illustrated in his powerful recent book and movie, both called “The Will to See.” Mr. Zemmour quoted a phrase of Rousseau: “Beware of those cosmopolitans who search in their books for duties they disdain at […]

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Texas Superintendent Apologizes After Official’s Holocaust Remarks

A Texas school superintendent apologized to his district on Thursday after one of his top officials advised teachers that, if they have a book about the Holocaust in their classroom, they should give students access to a book from an “opposing” perspective. Lane Ledbetter, the superintendent of the Carroll Independent School District in Southlake, Texas, […]

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Van Gogh Watercolor, Once Seized by Nazis, to be Sold at Auction

A watercolor by Vincent van Gogh, seized by the Nazis during World War II and not publicly exhibited since 1905, is to be sold at auction next month in New York, where experts at Christie’s estimate it could sell for between $20 and $30 million. The proceeds of the sale of the work, “Meules de […]

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A Conductor’s Impossible Legacy

We live in a time of intense scrutiny of the moral failings of artists — even, or perhaps especially, those whose creations we admire. And in few classical musicians is the gap between sublime work and shameful actions greater than the conductor Wilhelm Furtwängler. Consumed by an exalted belief in the power of music, and […]

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Visconti’s Operatic Autopsy of German History, Restored Anew

The revered Italian director Luchino Visconti was openly gay yet devoutly Catholic, ostensibly Communist yet unyieldingly aristocratic. In short, he embodied contradictions that haunt many of his films, in which criticism can sometimes be confused with reverence, or obsessive detail with tasteless excess. Nowhere is this more evident, to sometimes frustrating and other times awe-inspiring […]

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A Nazi Legacy Haunts a Museum’s New Galleries

ZURICH — With the opening of an imposing extension on Saturday, the Zurich Kunsthaus became Switzerland’s largest art museum. The vast new cube designed by the British architect David Chipperfield, opposite the original building on a central square, more than doubles the museum’s exhibition space. An airy atrium leads to a newly installed garden, and […]

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U.S. Holocaust Museums Are Updating Content and Context

With an urgency to preserve memory and modernize as the remaining Holocaust survivors enter their 80s and 90s, at least half a dozen Holocaust museums are being built, plan to break ground or have recently expanded, with more broadening their approach to look beyond the past and reflect today’s social changes. Steven Spielberg’s U.S.C. Shoah […]

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Neal Sher, U.S. Government’s Leading Nazi Hunter, Dies at 74

Neal Sher, a lawyer who for 11 years ran the federal office that rooted out World War II-era Nazis in the United States and moved to revoke their citizenship and deport them, died on Sunday at his home in Manhattan. He was 74. His wife, Bonnie Kagan, said the cause was most likely cardiac arrest. […]

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Antisemitic Graffiti Found at Auschwitz

Vandals sprayed antisemitic slogans and phrases denying the Holocaust in English and German on nine wooden barracks at the Auschwitz-Birkenau memorial site, in what officials there called “an outrageous attack on the symbol of one of the greatest tragedies in human history.” The police in Oswiecim, the town in southern Poland where the concentration camp […]

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Germany Sets Aside an Additional $767 Million for Holocaust Survivors, Officials Say

“We’re dealing with people who weren’t even born during the Holocaust,” he said, adding that negotiators used Zoom because of the coronavirus pandemic. “They still recognize their moral responsibility.” The German Embassy in Washington did not immediately comment. Ms. Khusid, who moved to the United States in 2010 to live near her daughter, is one […]

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A Tech-Savvy Holocaust Memorial in Ukraine Draws Critics and Crowds

KYIV, Ukraine — An advertisement on the Ukrainian-language version of Tinder, the online dating platform, offered a not-so-romantic experience. “Touch the tragedy of Babyn Yar,” the ad suggested, urging users to learn more about one of the largest mass shootings of Jews in World War II, at a site in Kyiv. The pitch was hardly […]

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In ‘Afterlives,’ About Looted Art, Why Are the Victims an Afterthought?

Some headlines from the last few months. March: the French government agrees to return a major landscape by Gustav Klimt to the heirs of Nora Stiasny, a Jewish woman from Vienna, forced to sell it before being sent to her death in 1942. June: the Royal Museums of Fine Arts in Brussels returns a still […]

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German Police Arrest 96-Year-Old Nazi Suspect Who Tried to Skip Court

BERLIN — The 96-year-old woman, a former secretary in a concentration camp, was supposed to appear in court to face charges of being an accessory in the deaths of more than 11,000 people, in what may be one of the last Nazi trials in Germany. But instead of taking a taxi from her assisted living […]

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