Tag: Historic Buildings and Sites

How a 7,000-Ton Broadway Theater Was Hoisted 30 Feet

If you’ve ever lost at Jenga by toppling a tower after removing a block, you might appreciate what developers have accomplished at TSX Broadway, a hotel and entertainment complex in Times Square. The developer of the 46-story building has managed to loosen its bottom floors and lift them 30 feet without sending anything crashing down […]

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8 of the Best Bike Trails in the U.S.

In the early 20th century, the patchwork of the United States was quilted together by almost 300,000 miles of railroad lines. When train transport fell into disuse in the 1950s and ’60s, a movement began to transform those abandoned industrial corridors into recreational space. Those miles of track had the potential to be ideal bike […]

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8 of the Best Bike Trails in the U.S.

In the early 20th century, the patchwork of the United States was quilted together by almost 300,000 miles of railroad lines. When train transport fell into disuse in the 1950s and ’60s, a movement began to transform those abandoned industrial corridors into recreational space. Those miles of track had the potential to be ideal bike […]

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Saving Modernism in the Hamptons

Timothy Godbold, an interior designer based in Southampton, used to just be an enthusiastic fan of the angular modernist homes perched atop dunes near his house. And, sometimes, when he discovered an early architectural gem that really excited him, he’d share a photo with his followers on Instagram. But in March 2020, after he posted […]

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How Preservationists Are Losing the Fight Against Luxury Real Estate

Poughkeepsie’s historic preservation commission has adamantly opposed this plan, declining to issue a certificate of appropriateness. This has prevented the developers from obtaining the necessary permits to proceed, and they have appealed the decision. City legislators upheld it, and the developers have sued. The case is continuing. Despite the lawsuit, the city recently closed on […]

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In Senegal’s Former Capital, a Colonial Statue in Hiding Is No Longer Welcome

SAINT-LOUIS, Senegal — For more than a century, the French general who shaped Senegal’s former capital was hailed as a hero and a father figure, his bronze statue triumphantly standing on a square that bore his name. Under his feet, carved into the stone of a massive pedestal, a message read: “To its governor Faidherbe, […]

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Mi’ilya, Christian Village in Israel, Digs Into Crusader Past

MI’ILYA, Israel — In the middle of Eilia Arraf’s home — between two living rooms, a cactus garden and a makeshift gym — there are two large pits, each containing the ruins of a church that archaeologists believe was built about 1,600 years ago. Mr. Arraf found large sections of the church’s mosaic floors under […]

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Mi’ilya, Christian Village in Israel, Digs Into Crusader Past

MI’ILYA, Israel — In the middle of Eilia Arraf’s home — between two living rooms, a cactus garden and a makeshift gym — there are two large pits, each containing the ruins of a church that archaeologists believe was built about 1,600 years ago. Mr. Arraf found large sections of the church’s mosaic floors under […]

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When the Textile Industry Was Forced Out of the Textile Building

The work-from-home era turned out to be a bonanza for textile companies. Remote workers started sprucing up their homes, especially after stimulus checks arrived. Adding to the good fortune, Midtown’s smaller landlords, hungry for commercial tenants after their buildings began to empty out during the lockdown, courted the ousted tenants of 295 with discounted rents. […]

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What to Do in London: Platinum Jubilee, ‘Bridgerton’ Events and More

London is springing back to life. Heathrow Airport reports that March 2022 was its busiest month since the start of the pandemic, with passenger travel from North America in particular increasing by more than 60 percent from January 2022. The uptick is linked to the British government’s recent elimination of coronavirus restrictions, a welcome move […]

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A Long Walk Through Japan’s Kii Peninsula

Stand on the summit of Mount Hinodegatake, look inland across the Kii Peninsula, and there before you are a thousand peaks, crumpled earth like tin foil, frozen roil to the horizon, razorback edges of rock and soil. All muted tones. Turn toward the ocean and you’ll see the jagged coast, wrapping from the port of […]

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Demolishing City of the Dead Will Displace a Lively Quarter of Cairo

CAIRO — Whoever was being buried in Cairo’s oldest working cemetery on a recent afternoon had been of some consequence. Glossy S.U.V.s crammed the dusty lanes around an antique mausoleum draped in black and gold; designer sunglasses hid the mourners’ tears. The cemetery’s chief undertaker, Ashraf Zaher, 48, paused to survey the funeral, another job […]

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At Madison’s Montpelier, a Fight Over Power for Slaves’ Descendants

Last year, the foundation that runs the sprawling Virginia estate that was the home of President James Madison announced what it called a groundbreaking agreement to share power with a group representing descendants of the hundreds of enslaved workers who built and maintained the plantation. The agreement, held up as a model for other historic […]

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We Will Fight for Every Brick of Ukraine

Since the beginning of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, thousands of buildings across the country have been destroyed by cruise missiles, aerial bombs and shells. Entire cities — Mariupol, Izium and Volnovakha — are almost demolished. In Kharkiv, some of the most important architectural monuments of the Soviet era and the prerevolutionary period have suffered […]

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Hot Springs in the U.S.: Medicinal, Perhaps. Relaxing? Definitely.

Looking to hot springs hop, perhaps with some spa services on the side? Visit a bona fide hot springs town, like Steamboat Springs, Colo., Hot Springs, Mont., or head to Wyoming’s Hot Springs County, where ample amounts of mineral-rich water has led many resorts to crop up in a relatively close radius. The city of […]

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Britain’s Old War Office Will Soon Become a 5-Star Raffles Hotel

LONDON — From his office at 10 Downing Street, Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain places urgent daily calls to Ukraine’s wartime leader, Volodymyr Zelensky. Next door, in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, officials draw up new sanctions against the Russian oligarchs who have turned London into a turnkey haven to hide their assets and […]

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Anaïs Nin’s Los Angeles Hideaway Still Keeps Her Secrets

AMONG MANY WRITERS, there’s a commonly held belief that a desk must be organized, an office must be tidy, an entire home must be cleaned, before one can finally sit down and fill the empty pages before them. One can’t help but think of such habits — the physical manifestation of routine and discipline — when […]

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The Museum Ships and Submarines That Are National Landmarks 

Philadelphia The white-and-buff protected cruiser Olympia, found at the Independence Seaport Museum in Philadelphia, was Commodore George Dewey’s flagship at the Battle of Manila Bay in the Spanish-American War. In that 1898 engagement, the commodore (later Admiral of the Navy) led his column of ships into the bay and destroyed the Spanish fleet in the […]

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The Artists Turning Nina Simone’s Childhood Home Into a Creative Destination

Like Du Bois, Simone was an expat: When she died in 2003, after a protracted illness, she was living in Carry-le-Rouet, a small seaside town in the south of France, some 4,500 miles away from the house on East Livingston Street where she had been born 70 years earlier. Even though she lived nearly half […]

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Pompeii Moves With the Times

POMPEII, Italy — On a recent morning at the necropolis of Porta Sarno, just outside Pompeii’s eastern edge, Mattia Buondonno gingerly raised a protective tarp covering a tomb discovered last year. According to the inscription on the tomb’s pediment, its occupant was a freed slave named Marcus Venerius Secundio, who became rich and “organized performances […]

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Ukraine’s Architectural Treasures Face Destruction

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine brought searing images of human tragedy to witnesses around the world: thousands of civilians killed and injured; broken families, as mothers and children leave in search of refuge while fathers and other men stay behind to defend their country; and millions of refugees having already fled to neighboring countries, after just […]

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In Ukraine’s West, Lviv Makes Itself a Vital Rear Base

LVIV, Ukraine — Municipal workers were wrapping statues in protective coverings and boarding up the stained-glass windows of the many churches that fill this historic European city in western Ukraine, as the population readied for war. The city of Lviv, no more than 50 miles from the border with Poland, has been spared any direct […]

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Robert Hicks, Blockbuster Author and Battlefield Savior, Dies at 71

Robert Benjamin Hicks III was born on Jan. 30, 1951, in West Palm Beach, Fla., where his parents, Robert Hicks Jr. and Pauline Electa (Tallman) Hicks, ran a water-treatment company. He was descended on both sides from West Tennessee farmers — the town of Hicksville, Tenn., is named for one of his ancestors, and he […]

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Ukraine War Bares U.S. Army Delay in Creating New ‘Monuments Officers’

For months before the bombs started falling, Hayden Bassett watched over the cultural riches of Ukraine — the cathedrals of Kyiv, the historic buildings of Lviv, museums across the country and the ancient burial sites that dot its steppes. Using satellite imagery, Bassett, 32, an archaeologist and director of the Cultural Heritage Monitoring Lab at […]

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In Naples, a 19th-Century Palace Passed Down for Generations

IN THE HEART of Naples, Italy, a city whose peeling jewel-toned apartment buildings and Baroque churches often call to mind a faded but still glorious opera set, there is a 25-acre private park so lush and tranquil, it feels more like an enchanted woodland. Though it is mostly wild — a tangle of holm oaks, […]

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In Mexico, Ornately Painted Churches Enshrine Years of Indigenous Resilience

FOR CENTURIES, THE first thing that residents of the Mexican village of Nurio saw when they walked through the heavy wooden doors of their adobe-plastered church was an orchestra of angels. Painted on pine panels mounted in an arch beneath the choir, the images were likely completed in the mid-1600s, less than 150 years after […]

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Why Does the Demolition of a Marcel Breuer House Matter?

LAWRENCE, N.Y. — “Are people going to care about one little house?” asked Elizabeth Waytkus, who had been alerted some weeks ago to the possibility that a once-celebrated house by the architect Marcel Breuer would be demolished. She is the executive director of Docomomo US, a nonprofit organization that promotes the preservation of modern structures. […]

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Colby College Acquires Islands That Inspired Andrew and Betsy Wyeth

Nestled in the Atlantic Ocean, five miles off the coast of the picturesque town of Port Clyde, Maine, lie two rugged islands with stories to tell. Allen and Benner, as they are called, have witnessed a string of inhabitants over the centuries, from the Abenaki people and English colonists to homesteading lobstermen. And then came […]

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The Art Design for Abolitionist Place in Brooklyn Moves Forward

New York City is pushing forward with an artwork to celebrate the abolitionist movement that some detractors have said is too abstract in a city where so few monuments honor Black people with figurative sculptures. The city’s plan, still undergoing review, features a design by the artist Kameelah Janan Rasheed that incorporates messages of social […]

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In the Bronx, a Push to Save Cass Gilbert’s Train Stations

The elegant, decaying station at Westchester Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard, cloaked in ivy that is either glorious or spooky, depending on the time of year and quantity of leaves, is rendered in the style of an Italian palazzo. Featured in a 1909 Architectural League exhibition, Gilbert’s station design was “universally admired,” The New York Times […]

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A Marker Honoring Jackie Robinson Was Defaced. M.L.B. Helped Replace It.

Later, he added: “The association of guns and violence against African Americans in this country is one of the things that’s been going on for a long time. And so the fact that they shot these markers using guns was a signal that was being sent in some way.” (The Grady County Sheriff’s Office didn’t […]

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