Tag: Guantanamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)

Guantánamo Bay: Beyond the Prison

GUANTÁNAMO BAY, Cuba — Mention this place, and people tend to think of caged men wearing orange uniforms and on their knees, the image of opening day at the wartime prison four months after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. But this military base is more than one big prison. About 6,000 people live at […]

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F.B.I. Agents Became C.I.A. Operatives in Overseas Prisons

GUANTÁNAMO BAY, Cuba — In the torturous history of the U.S. government’s black sites, the F.B.I. has long been portrayed as acting with a strong moral compass. Its agents, disgusted with the violence they saw at a secret C.I.A. prison in Thailand, walked out, enabling the bureau to later deploy “clean teams” untainted by torture […]

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Accused 9/11 Mastermind Seeks Access to Secret Testimony

GUANTÁNAMO BAY, Cuba — A defense lawyer on Wednesday invoked the bedrock American right to confront one’s accuser as he asked a military judge to permit the accused mastermind of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks to attend secret testimony by two psychologists who waterboarded him 183 times. The argument illustrates the on-again, off-again nature of […]

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Foreman Says Military Jury Was Disgusted by C.I.A. Torture

Last week, the jury foreman said, was his closest encounter with a terrorist. They sat about 15 feet apart inside the courtroom at Guantánamo Bay, with the prisoner’s father and youngest sister watching at the back of the court. Mr. Khan’s description of his torture were reminiscent of portrayals in the movie “Zero Dark Thirty” […]

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Some Sept. 11 Trial Secrets May Not Be Secrets Anymore

GUANTÁNAMO BAY, Cuba — Prosecutors volunteered on Friday to review hundreds, perhaps thousands, of pages of classified C.I.A. documents in the Sept. 11 case to determine if some material provided to defense lawyers was too heavily redacted. The acknowledgment that some secrets at the Guantánamo court may no longer be secret came on the fourth […]

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The Stain of Guantánamo: Torture

To the Editor: In “Military Jurors Rebuke Torture as Moral Stain” (front page, Nov. 1), you report that seven out of eight senior American military officers dispatched to Guantánamo Bay to sentence a terrorist, Majid Khan, sent a clemency letter denouncing the torture he suffered in custody as “a stain on the moral fiber of […]

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U.S. Military Jury Condemns Terrorist’s Torture and Urges Clemency

At no point did the jurors suggest that any of Mr. Khan’s treatment was illegal. Their letter noted that Mr. Khan, who never attained U.S. citizenship, was held as an “alien unprivileged enemy belligerent,” a status that made him eligible for trial by military commission and “not technically afforded the rights of U.S. citizens.” But, […]

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For First Time in Public, a Detainee Describes Torture at C.I.A. Black Sites

He received beatings while nude and spent long stretches in chains — at times shackled to a wall and crouching “like a dog,” he said, or with his arms extended high above his head and chained to a beam inside his cell. He was kept in darkness and dragged, hooded and shackled, his head slamming […]

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Guantánamo Bay Cemetery Offers a View of the Base’s History

GUANTÁNAMO BAY, Cuba — At first glance, the graveyard down a road behind a locked gate on this remote U.S. Navy base looks like a miniature version of Arlington National Cemetery. But these marble headstones tell an entirely different story. Babies born to Haitian refugees and to American sailors rest here. So do Greek and […]

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Two More Guantánamo Detainees Are Approved for Release

Two men who have been held for years without charges at Guantánamo Bay — a Yemeni and an Afghan whose repatriation would most likely require reaching an agreement with the Taliban — have been approved for transfer, according to documents released on Wednesday. The interagency Periodic Review Board endorsed the transfers of Sanad Yislam al-Kazimi […]

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A Surprising Proposal at the Supreme Court in Torture Case

WASHINGTON — Twenty years after the Sept. 11 attacks, the Supreme Court on Wednesday found itself struggling to address two issues stemming from that period: torture and government secrecy. Before the justices were done for the day, the proceedings had taken a surprising turn. The basic question for the justices was whether the government could […]

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