Tag: Global Warming

Gas Stoves Leak Methane Even When Turned Off, Study Finds

Gas stoves leak significant amounts of methane when they are being ignited and even while they are turned off, according to a new report, adding to the growing debate over the effects of gas-powered appliances on human health and climate change. The small study — based on measurements from cooktops, ovens and broilers in 53 […]

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EU Scientists and Politicians Clash Over Gas and Nuclear as ‘Sustainable’ Investments

Yves here. This article, apparently reflecting the messaging of various interest groups, doesn’t appear to acknowledge the elephant in the room: why the big push to designate pretty obviously not green power sources, here gas and nuclear, as “sustainable”? Readers can correct me, but it looks as if this is a huge effort of a […]

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Russia Will Only Grow Stronger as the World Shifts to Cleaner Energy

Second, as oil and natural gas production shifts away from large, Western, publicly held oil and gas companies, oil companies owned by the countries in which vast resources are found will be able to flex their muscles more. Today, the so-called majors — the global producers including Shell, Chevron, Exxon, BP and Total — produce […]

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Biden Administration Cancels Mining Leases Near Wilderness Area

The Biden administration said Wednesday that it had canceled two mining leases that would have allowed a copper mine to be built near an area of pristine wilderness in Minnesota. The Interior Department said it had determined that the leases, held by Twin Metals Minnesota, a subsidiary of the Chilean mining conglomerate Antofagasta, were improperly […]

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E.P.A. Chief Vows to ‘Do Better’ to Protect Poor Communities From Environmental Harm

WASHINGTON — Michael S. Regan, the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, traveled to Jackson, Miss., in November to discuss the city’s poor water quality at an elementary school where children have to drink bottled water and use portable restrooms outside the building. The day he arrived, the halls were largely empty. Students had been […]

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Even Low Levels of Soot Can Be Deadly to Older People, Research Finds

WASHINGTON — Older Americans who regularly breathe even low levels of pollution from smokestacks, automobile exhaust, wildfires and other sources face a greater chance of dying early, according to a major study to be made public Wednesday. Researchers at the Health Effects Institute, a group that is funded by the Environmental Protection Agency as well […]

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The Era of Cheap Renewables Grinds To A Halt

Yves here. On the one hand, it’s easy to stereotype OilPrice as not necessarily evenhanded about renewables. On the other, we’ve been warning for some time that “clean energy” is an oxymoron. Low/no carbon sources have other environmental costs, such as use of environmentally nasty inputs like rare earths and lithium. And on top of […]

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Did We Miss Biden’s Most Important Remark About Russia?

Pretty much every crucial line in President Biden’s recent marathon news conference has been dissected by now — except one, the one that may turn out to be the most prescient. You had to be listening closely because it went by fast. It was when Biden told President Vladimir Putin that Russia has something much […]

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MIT Energy Initiative launches the Future Energy Systems Center

The MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI) has launched a new research consortium — the Future Energy Systems Center — to address the climate crisis and the role energy systems can play in solving it. This integrated effort engages researchers from across all of MIT to help the global community reach its goal of net-zero carbon emissions. […]

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Should Addiction Be Viewed as a Disease?

To the Editor: Re “Calling Addiction a Disease Is Misleading,” by Carl Erik Fisher (Opinion guest essay, Sunday Review, Jan. 16): Dr. Fisher’s opinion piece about addiction was misleading and polarizing. His arguments ignore decades of biomedical and behavioral research that have taught so much about the nature of substance use disorder, as it is […]

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A Fight Over Rooftop Solar Threatens California’s Climate Goals

Some energy experts say utilities would not be able to produce or buy enough renewable energy to replace what would be lost from the decline in rooftop solar panels — which supplied 9 percent of the state’s electricity in 2020, more than nuclear and coal put together. California would need to set aside about a […]

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Old-Fashioned, Inefficient Light Bulbs Live On at the Nation’s Dollar Stores

A second phase of the lighting efficiency rules was scheduled to go into effect in 2020, which would have eliminated virtually all incandescent bulbs, including the recent generation of halogens, from store shelves. But in 2017, the industry sued, setting up a settlement with the Trump administration that set the path for a rollback of […]

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Nothing Fundamental Has Changed: Biden Administration Greenlights More Fossil Fuel Drilling Permits in 2021 for Public Lands and Waters than Did Trump in 2017

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. As he moves into his second year as President, it seems the only promise Joe Biden has made good on is his pledge that “Nothing fundamental will change.” This promise even applies […]

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Can Works Like ‘Don’t Look Up’ Get Us Out of Our Heads?

Next month, Hulu will premiere the mini-series “Pam & Tommy,” a fictionalized account of the release of Pamela Anderson and Tommy Lee’s personal sex tape, which was stolen from their home in 1995 and sold on what was then called the “World Wide Web.” The show presents the tape as helping the web become more […]

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Can We Turn a Desert Into a Forest?

In the last decade, millions of Africans in the Sahel, a region of semiarid land that stretches for thousands of miles below the Sahara, have been displaced by violence and food and economic insecurity. Climate change is partly to blame — droughts and floods are growing longer and more frequent. But surging population growth, deforestation […]

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Beavers Offer Lessons About Managing Water in a Changing Climate, Whether the Challenge Is Drought or Floods

By Christine E. Hatch, Professor of Geosciences, UMass Amherst. Originally published at The Conversation It’s no accident that both the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the California Institute of Technology claim the beaver (Castor canadensis) as their mascots. Renowned engineers, beavers seem able to dam any stream, building structures with logs and mud that can flood […]

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Lisa Goddard, 55, Dies; Brought Climate Data to Those Who Needed It

Dr. Goddard became the institute’s director just after the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration withdrew funding — a major blow to a center that relied heavily on government support. With the institute facing low morale and an uncertain future, she rallied its staff and secured new and diversified funding. She then redoubled its outreach efforts, […]

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Jonathan Pershing to Leave Job as Climate Diplomat

WASHINGTON — Jonathan Pershing, who traveled to 21 countries to negotiate an international climate agreement last year as the Biden administration’s No. 2 global climate envoy, is leaving his position next month. Mr. Pershing is departing at a tenuous moment for global climate action. At a U.N. summit last year in Glasgow, nearly 200 nations […]

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Bringing climate reporting to local newsrooms

Last summer, Nora Hertel, a reporter for the St. Cloud Times in central Minnesota, visited a farm just northeast of the Twin Cities run by the Native American-led nonprofit Dream of Wild Health. The farm raises a mix of vegetables and flowering plants, and has a particular focus on cultivating rare heirloom varieties. It’s also […]

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