Tag: Gardens and Gardening

Meet an Ecologist Who Works for God (and Against Lawns)

WADING RIVER, N.Y. — If Bill Jacobs was a petty man, or a less religious one, he might look through the thicket of flowers, bushes and brambles that encircle his home and see enemies all around. For to the North, and to the South, and to the West and East and all points in between, […]

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How to Build a Terrarium, So It’s Always Gardening Season

During the months when you can’t be outside working in the garden, what could be better than a miniature landscape that sits in your living room? Just remember, as you put the finishing touches on your first terrarium and celebrate by cuing the chorus of “It’s a Small World (After All)”: This is a tiny […]

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27 Plant Gifts for Plant Lovers

If you didn’t know a Plant Person before, chances are you do now. The coronavirus pandemic ushered in a botanical boom: A new crop of victory gardeners resulted in a run on seeds; sales of plant-based meat alternatives and other foods soared; as did sales of plants both legal and quasi legal. Eleven Madison Park, […]

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The Ever-Evolving Art of Bonsai

THE PRACTICE OF miniaturizing plants is thought to have come to Japan from China sometime around the seventh century, when the two countries formally established diplomatic ties. By that point, Chinese gardeners had likely been creating potted landscapes, or penjing (“potted scenery”), for hundreds of years, bringing nature into the homes of political elites, painters […]

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Your Garden Isn’t Winding Down: It’s Still Lichen Season

Most of a lichen’s structure is the fungus. The alga lives with it, and in return for shelter it provides photosynthesis, producing sugars that sustain the fungus. But the two are not alone. “In many ways, lichen are miniature universes,” Dr. Allen and Dr. Lendemer write, as a diverse community of bacteria, non-lichen fungi, nematodes […]

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The Rose Queen of Texas

TYLER, Texas — Early on a recent Saturday, the townspeople of Tyler staked out spots along the Texas Rose Festival parade route. Marching bands boomed, convertibles honked, and T-shirt guns fired into the cheering crowd. Fourteen floats bore coteries of young women in whimsical, garden-themed gowns that wouldn’t have been out of place on the […]

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Coffee and Climate Have a Complicated Relationship

This article is part of a special report on Climate Solutions, which looks at efforts around the world to make a difference. Wilston Vilchez, a third-generation coffee farmer in the mountains of Nicaragua, has witnessed drastic climatic changes on his 25-acre coffee and cacao farm for years, but when two hurricanes hit within 15 days […]

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How the Resident of an N.Y.C. Cemetery Spends His Sundays

Joe Charap works at a cemetery. Although his job isn’t especially spooky, it has provided him with a healthy sense of mortality. “Just as trees grow and die, death is a part of life,” said Mr. Charap, the director of horticulture at Brooklyn’s renowned Green-Wood Cemetery, who tends to over 478 acres and 8,000 trees […]

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Leaf Blowers Destroy the Environment

As Mr. Fallows’s last point suggests, what’s bad for the environment is bad for humans, too — most menacingly, of course, for the employees of landscape services, who are exposed to these dangers all day long. The risks come not only from the noise and the chemical emissions that two-stroke engines produce, but also from […]

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At Her Home in Suffolk, Olivia Laing Finds Fresh Inspiration

A GARDEN BURSTING through the hard, cold ground in spring is a metaphor for resilience that few writers — especially those who are also gardeners — can resist. Mid-pandemic, the English cultural critic Olivia Laing, 44, moved into a Grade II-listed house on a third of an acre in the East Anglia county of Suffolk, two […]

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Glimpses in Los Angeles of an Oasis With Deep Immigrant Roots

Ten minutes from my home, next to a decommissioned landfill, a freeway and the largest port in the country, sits an unlikely hillside oasis of vegetables and fruit trees. Emerging like a mirage from its surroundings, the San Pedro Community Gardens occupy a six-acre parcel of city-owned land in the otherwise highly industrialized area of […]

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Today’s Must-Have Amenity? A Little Green Space.

RockFarmer Properties put a similar emphasis on weaving landscaping into the heart of its new building, the Rowan, a 46-unit condo at 21-21 31st Street in Astoria, Queens, designed by the architecture firm DXA Studio, with the horticultural designer Patrick Cullina. There, residents returning home will pass through a street-side garden to a green-roofed, glass-walled […]

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The Ephemeral Beauty of Night-Blooming Flowers

OF COURSE, IT may be this very indifference that attracts us, makes us want to reject sleep and propriety and stay up all night (when all the most interesting things happen). During the hardscrabble years of the Great Depression, people held vigils for the coming of the flowers, taking out notices in newspapers to proclaim […]

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A Ceramist Inspired by Folklore and the British Countryside

FIRST-TIME VISITORS TO the ceramist Prue Piper’s house are typically late, and readily forgiven for it, because the place, a charmingly ramshackle former 19th-century laundry in Somerset, England, nestled among 11 acres of garden, orchard and woodland, is nearly impossible to find. For one, it’s in a village, Marston Bigot, that hardly exists except in […]

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At This Renowned English Garden, Getting Your Hands Dirty Is the Point

The woodworkers gather in a thatched 15th-century barn and wield hand tools to produce ladders, garden benches and hurdles, which are barriers strewn around the garden to keep out badgers and other pests. Great Dixter has its own nursery, meadows, woodland and farmland, and composts its waste in towering stacks, later sterilized in-house to prevent […]

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