Tag: Freedom of the Press

Order Blocking New York Times Coverage of Project Veritas Stays in Place

A New York trial court judge on Tuesday declined to lift an order that temporarily prohibits The New York Times from publishing or pursuing certain documents related to the conservative group Project Veritas. The judge said at a hearing that he needed additional time to consider arguments and asked for additional briefs next week. The […]

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Judge Tries to Block New York Times’s Coverage of Project Veritas

A New York trial court judge ordered The New York Times on Thursday to temporarily refrain from publishing or seeking out certain documents related to the conservative group Project Veritas, an unusual instance of a court blocking coverage by a major news organization. The order raised immediate concerns among First Amendment advocates, who called it […]

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Raúl Rivero, Disenchanted Poet of the Cuban Revolution, Dies at 75

He and Ricardo González Alfonso founded the Association of Cuban Journalists in 2001. The next year they managed to publish two issues of De Cuba magazine before a crackdown by the Castro regime as part of the so-called Black Spring, which crushed the petition drive by the movement of dissident intellectuals. Scores of political renegades […]

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U.S. and China Agree to Ease Restrictions on Journalists

WASHINGTON — The United States and China announced an agreement on Tuesday to ease restrictions on foreign journalists operating in the two countries, tempering a diplomatic confrontation that led to the expulsion of some American reporters from China during the last year of the Trump administration. The deal was first reported by China Daily, the […]

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Zuo Fang, a Founder of China’s Southern Weekly, is Dead

Zuo Fang, a journalist who helped start China’s most influential reform-era newspaper and edited it with the conviction that the press should inform, enlighten and entertain rather than parrot Communist Party propaganda, died on Nov. 3 in Guangzhou, China. He was 86. His death, in a hospital, was announced by the newspaper he co-founded, Southern […]

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Hong Kong Broadcaster’s Swift Turn From Maverick Voice to Official Mouthpiece

HONG KONG — Not long after Patrick Li took over as the government-appointed director of Hong Kong’s public broadcaster, a digital lock pad appeared outside his office entrance. In the past, the director’s office had been where staffers at the broadcaster, Radio Television Hong Kong, gathered to air grievances with management decisions: programming changes, labor […]

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Project Veritas: Journalists or Political Spies?

WASHINGTON — Hours after F.B.I. agents searched the homes of two former Project Veritas operatives last week, James O’Keefe, the leader of the conservative group, took to YouTube to defend its work as “the stuff of responsible, ethical journalism.” “We never break the law,” he said, railing against the F.B.I.’s investigation into members of his […]

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How a Mistake by YouTube Shows Its Power Over Media

LONDON — The email subject line that arrived at 10:19 a.m. on Tuesday carried some of the worst information a small online news outlet can receive: “Novara Media we have removed your channel from YouTube.” Novara had spent years using YouTube to attract more than 170,000 subscribers for its left-leaning coverage of issues like climate […]

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Can a Nobel Peace Prize Protect Maria Ressa From Rodrigo Duterte?

Produced by ‘Sway’ Maria Ressa and Dmitri Muratov recently took home the Nobel Peace Prize, marking the first time working journalists have won the award since 1935. Ressa believes the Norwegian Nobel Committee’s decision to recognize journalists this year sends a signal that, once again, “we are on the brink of the rise of fascism.” […]

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How the Nobel Peace Prize Laid Bare the Schism in Russia’s Opposition

MOSCOW — If you lived in Putin’s Russia, what compromises would you make? Dmitri A. Muratov, a Moscow newspaper editor, has made his choice. He accepts donations from a business tycoon with Kremlin connections, refuses to publish articles about the personal lives of the Russian elite, and has petitioned President Vladimir V. Putin to help […]

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Philippines’ Nobel Prize Newsroom Is Overjoyed but Under Siege

The young editors and reporters of the Philippine news site Rappler were already busy on Friday. It was the last day to file papers for next year’s elections, and among the races they were covering was who would run to replace Rodrigo Duterte, the president who has for years attacked Rappler and issued not-so-veiled threats […]

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Luo Changping Detained in China After Criticizing ‘The Battle at Lake Changjin’

Luo Changping built a reputation as a muckraking journalist in China, a place where few dare pursue the calling, until he was forced out of the industry in 2014. Now a businessman, he has run afoul of the authorities again, this time over a critique spurred by a blockbuster movie about the Korean War. The […]

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‘Fake News’ Bill in South Korea Gets Shelved Amid Outcry

SEOUL — President Moon Jae-in and his Democratic Party in South Korea have spent months vowing to stamp out what they have called fake news in the media. But lawmakers had to postpone a vote on a new bill this week when they encountered a problem: no one can agree on exactly how to do […]

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