Tag: Economics

Tragedy Kept Alan Krueger From Claiming a Nobel Prize, but He’s Not Forgotten

But Clinton was persuaded finally in 1996 to raise it in stages to $5.15, in part by Card and Krueger’s paper. Krueger himself was by then working in Clinton’s administration as chief economist at the Labor Department. (Krueger would later be assistant treasury secretary for economic policy and chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers […]

Read More

The Democrats’ Fear of Assigning a Number to the Debt Ceiling Is Lame and Ridiculous

Growing partisan rancor over the debt limit culminated in 2011, when a prolonged struggle by the Obama administration to get Congress to approve an increase prompted Standard & Poor’s to downgrade its credit rating on U.S. treasury bills. No credit agency had ever done this before, and none has done so since (though S&P has recently threatened that […]

Read More

MIT economist Joshua Angrist shares Nobel Prize

Joshua Angrist, an MIT labor economist whose work has delved deeply into issues of employment and education while helping to establish empirical rigor throughout economics, has been named winner of the 2021 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel.  He shares the award with David Card of the University of California […]

Read More

New “risk triage” platform pinpoints compounding threats to US infrastructure

Over a 36-hour period in August, Hurricane Henri delivered record rainfall in New York City, where an aging storm-sewer system was not built to handle the deluge, resulting in street flooding. Meanwhile, an ongoing drought in California continued to overburden aquifers and extend statewide water restrictions. As climate change amplifies the frequency and intensity of […]

Read More

MIT economist Nancy Rose receives the Carolyn Shaw Bell Award

MIT economist Nancy L. Rose, the Charles P. Kindleberger Professor of Applied Economics, has been awarded the Carolyn Shaw Bell Award from the American Economic Association’s Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession (CSWEP). The annual prize, named in honor of the late Wellesley College faculty member who was the first chair […]

Read More

MIT School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences welcomes six new faculty

Interim Dean Agustín Rayo and the School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences recently welcomed the newest members of the MIT SHASS faculty. The six new faculty for Fall 2021 bring an array of research interests and domain knowledge to MIT, including: ethical questions about misinformation and lying; macroeconomics; economic theory; transnational power and civic […]

Read More

How the Media’s Framing of the Budget Debate Favors the Right

The Democratic policy proposals are all, every single one, investments. Universal pre-kindergarten is an investment in children, mostly poor, who don’t have access to that now, and a jillion studies show it pays off. Paid family leave is an investment in families’ mental well-being. A national network of childcare facilities is an investment that will […]

Read More

Shaping the future of work

If you had told MIT professor Tom Kochan 10 years ago that teaching online courses would forever change his outlook on education, he’d have said, “I don’t think so.” Today, Kochan has come around entirely to the power of thoughtfully constructed online learning experiences after spending six years creating and refining successive iterations of Shaping […]

Read More

Mitch McConnell Is Getting Away With a Dangerous Debt Ceiling Gambit

As The Washington Post’s Paul Kane wrote last week, McConnell’s aim is to “keep GOP hands clean of all this new spending in advance of the 2022 midterm elections.” The fact that the media takes this at face value—remember, the debt ceiling rise accounts only for money that Congress has already agreed to spend—is a […]

Read More

Study: As a population gets older, automation accelerates

You might think robots and other forms of workplace automation gain traction due to intrinsic advances in technology — that innovations naturally find their way into the economy. But a study co-authored by an MIT professor tells a different story: Robots are more widely adopted where populations become notably older, filling the gaps in an […]

Read More