Tag: Documentary Films and Programs

Bob Neuwirth, Colorful Figure in Dylan’s Circle, Dies at 82

Bob Neuwirth, a painter, recording artist and songwriter who also had an impact as a member of Bob Dylan’s inner circle and as a conduit for two of Janis Joplin’s best-known songs, died on Wednesday in Santa Monica, Calif. He was 82. His partner, Paula Batson, said the cause was heart failure. Mr. Neuwirth had […]

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The Strange Afterlife of George Carlin

In the closing monologue from a recent episode of his HBO talk show, Bill Maher cataloged a series of social conditions that he suggested were hampering stand-up comedy and imperiling free speech: cancel culture, a perceived increase of sensitivity on college campuses, and Will Smith slapping Chris Rock at the Oscars. Near the end of […]

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‘Tantura’ Documentary Reopens Debate About Israel’s Foundational Story

DOR BEACH, Israel — For many Jewish Israeli visitors to Dor, a Mediterranean beach, its unremarkable parking lot is where they leave their cars on the way to the sea. For many Palestinian citizens of Israel who live nearby, the parking lot is on the site where they say dozens of their relatives were buried […]

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Pamela Anderson, Amber Heard and the Limits of the Feminist Redemption Plot

“Pam & Tommy” is not the most recent example of this genre, though it is perhaps the most controversial — in part because Ms. Anderson wanted nothing to do with it. But by the time it was announced, in 2018, there was a whole host of other successful projects like it: a biopic and documentary […]

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What to Stream in May

It’s been two years since “Normal People,” the series adapted from Sally Rooney’s novel of the same name, debuted on Hulu. Depending on how warped your perception of time is lately, that may feel like it was just last week. Or perhaps the experience of watching the show glimmers in your memory like a relic […]

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A Sea of White Flags Honoring Those Lost to Covid

In September 2021, more than 660,000 white flags were planted on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as part of a participatory art project by Suzanne Brennan Firstenberg titled “In America: Remember.” It was not the first time the National Mall served as a memorial for those lost to a pandemic; in 1987 the Names […]

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On TV, the Truth Hurts

As seen on the news, real life right now is heartbreaking, terrifying, depressing and exhausting. But as entertainment? Real life is hot, hot, hot, baby! The first few months of 2022 in TV have been a nonstop pageant of ripped-from-reality series. That juicy magazine feature you read a few years ago? It’s a show now: […]

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Tony Hawk Discusses His Broken Leg

While everyone’s attention was focused elsewhere, another thing happened at this year’s Oscars. Tony Hawk, the world’s most iconic skateboarder, unveiled his latest trick: Standing without a cane. Hawk, 53, took the stage with Kelly Slater and Shaun White to introduce a James Bond movie montage, but it was Hawk’s mobility that seemed the most […]

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Bristling Against the West, China Rallies Domestic Sympathy for Russia

While Russian troops have battered Ukraine, officials in China have been meeting behind closed doors to study a Communist Party-produced documentary that extols President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia as a hero. The humiliating collapse of the Soviet Union, the video says, was the result of efforts by the United States to destroy its legitimacy. […]

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Documentary Filmmaker Mantas Kvedaravicius Is Killed in Ukraine 

A Lithuanian documentary filmmaker has been killed in the besieged southern city of Mariupol, according to his colleagues and the Ukrainian Defense Ministry’s information agency. The agency said on Sunday that the award-winning filmmaker, Mantas Kvedaravicius, had been killed in an attack by Russia “while trying to leave Mariupol.” A Lithuanian news agency, 15min, reported […]

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‘Babi Yar: Context’ Review: Unearthing Footage of a Nazi Massacre

Over two days in September, 1941, German soldiers, assisted by Ukrainian collaborators, murdered 33,771 Jews at the Babi Yar ravine outside Kyiv. The massacre was one of the earliest and deadliest episodes in what is sometimes called the “holocaust by bullets,” a phase of the Nazi genocide that took place outside the mechanized slaughter of […]

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Why the Sudden Urge to Reconsider Famous Women?

This policing via popular media — comparing women’s outfits, judging their beach bodies and speculating as to how and why they were or weren’t pregnant — served as a warning for less famous women: See what can happen when you leave the house? The subtext was that any woman who put herself out there was […]

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Why the Sudden Urge to Reconsider Famous Women?

This policing via popular media — comparing women’s outfits, judging their beach bodies and speculating as to how and why they were or weren’t pregnant — served as a warning for less famous women: See what can happen when you leave the house? The subtext was that any woman who put herself out there was […]

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How Film Forum Became the Best Little Movie House in New York

It’s just before 8 p.m. on a recent Friday night in Manhattan, and a crowd of moviegoers is lined up to see “Great Freedom” (2021), an Austrian film that tells the tender and terrible story of a concentration camp survivor in Germany who’s repeatedly imprisoned for his sexuality. Sebastian Meise, the film’s director, and its […]

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Marina Goldovskaya, 80, Dies; Filmmaker Documented Russian Life

In 1938, her father, then a deputy minister of film, had been overseeing construction of the Kremlin’s movie theater when a lamp exploded. Stalin believed it was an assassination attempt and sentenced him to five months in prison. Speaking from Latvia, her son, Mr. Livnev, who is also a film director and producer, said: “The […]

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Warhol-mania: Why the Famed Pop Artist Is Everywhere Again

Andy Warhol left behind a lot of self portraits. There was the black-and-white shot from a photo booth strip, from 1963, in which he wore dark black shades and a cool expression. In 1981, he took a Polaroid of himself in drag, with a platinum blond bob and bold red lips. Five years later, he […]

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What a ‘Grief Camp’ For Kids Can Show Us About Healing

Three years ago, we came across a short article about Missing You, a summer camp in Belgium where children struggling with grief can come together and bond with their peers. It struck us as an incredibly pure idea, and we wanted to know more. What does a grief camp look like? Is it a sullen, […]

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Av Westin, Newsman Behind ABC’s ‘20/20,’ Dies at 92

He left CBS in 1967, spent two years as executive director of the noncommercial Public Broadcasting Laboratory and joined ABC News in 1969 as the executive producer of its evening newscast, then anchored by Frank Reynolds. It was an era when “ABC Evening News” trailed CBS and NBC’s nightly news operations in prestige, ratings and […]

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Jonas Mekas, the Avant-Garde Filmmaker Who Tried to Tell the Truth

But in “Reminiscences of a Journey to Lithuania,” Mekas returns to his rural hometown Semeniskiai after nearly 30 years, and the immersive installation makes you feel as if you’re there with him, drinking beer with Adolfas and their elderly mother. In “This Side of Paradise,” he teaches Jackie Kennedy’s children how to use a camera […]

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Mandy Patinkin Finds Healing in Refugee Work and Praying With His Dog

2. Praying with his dog, Becky With the pandemic and all the healing that needs to be done, I thought, “I’ve got to feed this dog twice a day. I’ll say the healing prayer for the whole world.” So I do three Jewish prayers: the Shema first; then the “Mi Shebeirach,” which my dear friend […]

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Brent Renaud, Crusading Filmmaker, Is Killed at 50

In a 2013 interview with Filmmaker magazine, Brent Renaud described facing violence for the sake of his work — repeatedly being attacked by thugs while reporting on a crackdown against the Muslim Brotherhood in Cairo, for instance, and drawing fire from soldiers in Cambodia when the car he was riding in crashed through a military […]

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With ‘Lucy and Desi,’ Amy Poehler Gets to the Heart of a Marriage

It was hours and hours of stuff. One of our producers was at [Ball’s daughter] Lucie’s house, and she pointed to a box, like, “What’s in that one?” It was very much a genie-in-the-bottle moment, finding all these audiotapes. When you’re doing a documentary, you realize that you and your editor [Robert Martinez, whose credits […]

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‘Summer of Soul’ Reclaims a Concert Documentary Tradition

In the mid-2010s, films about popular music dominated the best documentary feature category at the Academy Awards. “Searching for Sugar Man,” “Twenty Feet From Stardom” and “Amy” all won the prize. It was an unexpected boom: in the decades prior, nonclassical music documentaries had received only scattered nominations. All of those winning films were biographies […]

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‘The 2022 Oscar Nominated Short Films’ Review: Small Tales, Big Ideas

With three out of five nominees, Netflix is almost bigfooting this year’s documentary short category, but one of those three is a standout. “Audible,” directed by Matt Ogens, observes the high school football team at the Maryland School for the Deaf, zeroing in on one player, Amaree McKenstry. His senior year is eventful beyond the […]

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Stream These Three Great Documentaries

The proliferation of documentaries on streaming services makes it difficult to choose what to watch. Each month, we’ll choose three nonfiction films — classics, overlooked recent docs and more — that will reward your time. ‘The Feeling of Being Watched’ (2018) Stream it on Amazon and Kanopy. In a documentary that functions simultaneously as a […]

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A Stroke Left Him Isolated. Love Is His Lifeline.

My father — a poet, rabbi and quadriplegic survivor of a brainstem stroke — was supposed to come home the evening of March 13, 2020, for Shabbat dinner. Instead, with the advent of the pandemic, he was relegated to his bedroom at his long-term care facility. He remained there — with few exceptions — for […]

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‘The Automat,’ Where Dining Out Was D.I.Y.

What do Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Colin Powell, Elliott Gould, Carl Reiner and the former Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz have in common? They all fondly recall eating at an Automat — that beloved institution of D.I.Y. dining that lasted from 1902 to 1991 in New York and Philadelphia. Lisa Hurwitz’s detailed documentary, “The Automat” (in theaters), […]

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