Tag: Democracy

Why Can’t Democrats Make GOP Extremism a Campaign Issue?

In the past few weeks, Democratic strategists and pollsters have been surveying recent elections and polling data to size up where the party stands. Some of the findings have been ominous. A recent PBS Newshour/Marist Poll found that adults feel that Democrats are a bigger threat to American democracy than Republicans, although it was within […]

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You Can’t Beat Climate Change Without Tackling Disinformation

People protest at the COP26 climate justice march in London. (Matthew Chattle / Barcroft Media via Getty Images) This story originally appeared in The Nation and is part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story. In the past month or so, climate disinformation has been making its way […]

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An Open Letter in Defense of Democracy

Adolph ReedEmeritus professor of political science, University of Pennsylvania Kim Lane ScheppeleLaurance S. Rockefeller professor of sociology and international affairs, Princeton University Charles SykesFounder and editor at large, The Bulwark George ThomasBurnet C. Wohlford professor of American political institutions, Claremont McKenna College Michael TomaskyEditor, The New RepublicEditor, Democracy: A Journal of Ideas Jeffrey K. TulisProfessor of government and law, University of Texas […]

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3 Questions: Administering elections in a hyper-partisan era

Charles Stewart III is the Kenan Sahin Distinguished Professor of Political Science at MIT and a renowned expert on U.S. election administration. A founding member of the influential Caltech/MIT Voting Technology Project, Stewart also founded MIT’s Election Data and Science Lab, which recently teamed up with the American Enterprise Institute to release a major report: […]

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The Democracy Walt Whitman Wanted

In one of those fine cosmic coincidences that spangle throughout cultural history, the poet Hart Crane watched the legendary dancer Isadora Duncan perform in Cleveland one night in December 1922. Crane was yet unknown; Duncan’s life was approaching its end. (Five years later, she died in a bizarre scarf-related automobile accident on the French Riviera.) […]

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How Newspapers Deserted Their Civic Mission

The background worldview of this upper-crust demographic is broadly liberal. Like other media critics, Usher bemoans the hoary trope of the “Trump safari”—the reflexive impulse across many elite liberal news outlets to dispatch intrepid anthropological teams of reporters into heartland diners and other small-town venues to chronicle the mores and thought processes of the mysterious, […]

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Stephen Breyer’s Supreme Delusions

Breyer is clearest about one point of overriding importance: that it would be dreadful to abandon the line between politics and law, wherever that line is—and that those calling for political reform of a political institution are dangerous. The “highly nuanced” reality of judicial politicking, the justice writes, is at odds with the impression of […]

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These People Are Lining Up for 10 Hours to Get Their Country Out of the ‘Dark Ages’

VOTER APPLICANTS LINE UP BEFORE DAWN OUTSIDE A MALL IN MANILA TO REGISTER FOR THE 2022 ELECTIONS. PHOTO: COURTESY OF MAUI MAURICIO It was still dark when Maui Mauricio, a video producer in Manila, Philippines, arrived at the driveway of a mall where the government was registering voters for next year’s elections. He made sure […]

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The Reconciliation Bill Is About Saving Democracy

Jayapal should stand her ground. However, she also has to recognize that unfortunately, it’s a sad fact that Manchin and Sinema have more leverage than she and the progressives do, because each of them can singlehandedly kill the bill. But she rose to the occasion. She has greatly enhanced her status and reputation, and I […]

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Citizens emerge from the slums

Do the world’s nearly 1 billion urban poor, who subsist without legal housing, reliable water and sewer infrastructure, and predictable employment, lack political engagement as well? Ying Gao does not buy the claim by many social scientists that social and economic marginalization necessarily means political marginalization. “My results contradict the prevailing wisdom about slums and […]

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Data flow’s decisive role on the global stage

In 2016, Meicen Sun came to a profound realization: “The control of digital information will lie at the heart of all the big questions and big contentions in politics.” A graduate student in her final year of study who is specializing in international security and the political economy of technology, Sun vividly recalls the emergence […]

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New views of autocracy emerge from historic archives

“There’s a stereotype of dictatorship where one person decides everything, but that’s not always how politics works in an authoritarian regime,” says Emilia Simison, a sixth-year doctoral student in political science. Since 2015, Simison has been able to access and study documents that chronicle the lawmaking machinery of some of the past century’s most notorious […]

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There May Be No Realistic Way to Fix Gerrymandering

Roberts concluded that they were asking the court to impose proportional representation on American elections, which the Constitution neither denies nor demands. “The Founders certainly did not think proportional representation was required,” he wrote. “For more than 50 years after ratification of the Constitution, many states elected their congressional representatives through at-large or ‘general ticket’ […]

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