Tag: Coronavirus Reopenings

Germany Announces Restrictions on Unvaccinated People

Top German officials said on Thursday they had agreed on tough new coronavirus restrictions that would leave unvaccinated people out of many aspects of public life, as the country tries to fight a monthlong surge in infections that has been breaking daily case records. “You can see from the decisions that we have understood that […]

Read More

How Is the Pandemic Reshaping New York City’s Cultural Landscape?

The cultural sector continues its cautious reopening this fall as theaters, museums, restaurants and other establishments recalibrate. Prognostications about the city’s wellness are ever changing — but this is hardly the first time that New York has weathered dire pronouncements about its vitality as one of the nation’s cultural capitals. The city has prevailed through […]

Read More

As World Shuts Borders to Stop Omicron, Japan Offers a Cautionary Tale

TOKYO — With the emergence of the new Omicron variant of the coronavirus late last week, countries across the globe rushed to close their borders to travelers from southern Africa, even in the absence of scientific information about whether such measures were necessary or likely to be effective in stopping the virus’s spread. Japan has […]

Read More

‘Encanto’ Reaches No. 1, but Moviegoers Are Tough to Lure Back

Hollywood has stopped running from the pandemic: For the first time since March 2020, movie theaters had a wide array of new films for exclusive screening over the holiday weekend. And studios did not hedge their bets by offering simultaneous streaming options. To see the gloriously reviewed “Encanto,” the campy crime drama “House of Gucci” […]

Read More

This Year’s ‘Nutcracker’ Kids: Taller, Older and Savoring It All

They need to be at least 12. They need to be vaccinated. And they need new costumes. But what they don’t need to be? Short. If the kids in New York City Ballet’s production of “George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker” look more like teenagers this season, it’s because in many cases they are. When rehearsals began […]

Read More

Wall Street Warms Up, Grudgingly, to Remote Work, Unthinkable Before Covid

In private, many senior bank executives tasked with raising attendance among their direct reports expressed irritation. They said it was unfair for highly paid employees to keep working from home while others — like bank tellers or building workers — dutifully come in every day. Salaries at investment banks in the New York area averaged […]

Read More

New York City’s International Tourists Are Trickling Back

The lines are getting longer at the Halal Guys food cart in the heart of Manhattan. The number of international visitors buying Statue of Liberty tickets has jumped more than 50 percent. And a few thousand more people are walking through Times Square. After more than 18 months, the United States reopened its borders on […]

Read More

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Is New York’s Conductor Now

The set for “Porgy and Bess” had been pushed to the back of the Metropolitan Opera’s stage on a recent Wednesday morning, and in front, lines of chairs and music stands had been set up. The company’s orchestra and chorus were coming together for the first time with the cast of “Eurydice” — a recent […]

Read More

N.Y.C. Clubs Are Packed, but Many Are Still in Debt

“Everyone was almost forced to have to work together, there was no other option, to understand every new rule, new law,” said Sophia Sempepos, a Good Room manager. “Everyone was communicating about what procedures they were taking,” she continued. “People were giving each other liquor to help restock.” Public Records, a music and performance space […]

Read More

The School Board Wars, Part 2

Campbell Robertson contributed reporting. The Daily is made by Lisa Tobin, Rachel Quester, Lynsea Garrison, Clare Toeniskoetter, Paige Cowett, Michael Simon Johnson, Brad Fisher, Larissa Anderson, Chris Wood, Jessica Cheung, Stella Tan, Alexandra Leigh Young, Lisa Chow, Eric Krupke, Marc Georges, Luke Vander Ploeg, M.J. Davis Lin, Austin Mitchell, Neena Pathak, Dan Powell, Dave Shaw, […]

Read More

What’s Next for Stocks Like Peloton and Zoom

But in the first half of 2021, the fund sold out of that position and has built stakes in companies that are tied to infrastructure spending, home improvement and health care, and that Mr. Mintz thinks offer strong potential for growth over the near term. “When you’ve got this surge in reopenings, obviously you’ve got […]

Read More

When Will the Covid Pandemic End?

‘SARS-CoV-2 could be with us forever’ One way or the other — through vaccination or infection — experts say the coronavirus will eventually become endemic: Outbreaks will be rarer and smaller, and hospitalizations and deaths will decline. Opinion Conversation Questions surrounding the Covid-19 vaccine and its rollout. How long it will take to get there, […]

Read More

The Worst of Both Worlds: Zooming From the Office

For months, the putt-putt course sat unused. The beanbag chairs lay empty. The kitchen whiteboard, above where the keg used to live, displayed in fading marker “Beers on Tap” from a happy hour in March 2020. But on a recent weekday, over in the common area was a sign of life — fresh bagels. As […]

Read More

The Debate Over the Future of Outdoor Dining in New York

It was an unexpectedly raucous event. About 100 people packed a hearing in Manhattan’s West Village in the summer, eager to vent about an issue dividing neighborhoods across New York City. The matter at hand: outdoor dining. As city officials presented a plan to make it permanent, residents waved matching signs with slogans like “Outdoor […]

Read More

What’s the Future of Outdoor Dining in New York?

It was an unexpectedly raucous event. About 100 people packed a hearing in Manhattan’s West Village in the summer, eager to vent about an issue dividing neighborhoods across New York City. The matter at hand: outdoor dining. As city officials presented a plan to make it permanent, residents waved matching signs with slogans like “Outdoor […]

Read More

If Remote Work Empties Downtowns, Can Theaters Fill Their Seats?

Even so, the opera, which can seat 2,928 with Covid restrictions, sold an average of 1,912 tickets per show for “Fidelio,” its second production of this new season. That’s better than its second production in 2019, Britten’s “Billy Budd,” a searing work that does not always attract big crowds. But it drew fewer people than […]

Read More

Denmark’s Hard Lessons About Trust and the Pandemic

Since mid-September, Denmark has tried living as if the pandemic was over. Schools and workplaces are open. Until Friday, you could go to a bar, a nightclub, a restaurant, a movie theater, the gym and sporting arenas without showing proof of vaccination. There was no social distancing or restrictions on large gatherings, even indoors. Face […]

Read More

‘Be Nice to Tourists’: New York’s Arts Scene Needs International Visitors

When many readers in Toronto, London, Paris and Hong Kong open their newspapers on Monday, they will be greeted with a full-page advertisement from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. “We reopened in August 2020, but have been missing one critical thing — you, our international visitors,” the ad will say. “The Met […]

Read More

What Bosses Really Think About the Future of the Office

People think about the office differently now — including the C.E.O.s who for so long kept a watchful eye on which workers were at their desks. Bosses who once relished face time have grown less attached to crowded elevators and overstuffed conference rooms. Executives who got promoted by putting in 15-hour days sitting in Aeron […]

Read More

N.F.L. Fines Green Bay Packers and Aaron Rodgers for Covid Violations

The N.F.L. has fined the Green Bay Packers $300,000 and two of its players, quarterback Aaron Rodgers and wide receiver Allen Lazard, $14,650 each for failing to follow the Covid-19 protocols agreed on by the league and players’ union. The penalties come about a week after Rodgers tested positive for the coronavirus and his subsequent […]

Read More

Powell’s Books Survived Amazon. Can It Reinvent Itself After the Pandemic?

PORTLAND, Ore. — Over its half-century in the heart of Portland, Powell’s Books has survived an unending array of foundational threats — the oft-anticipated death of reading, the rise of Amazon, the supposedly irretrievable abandonment of the American downtown. None of that provided preparation for the tumult of the past two years. The pandemic shut […]

Read More

With Tears, Hugs and Balloons, US Allows Vaccinated Foreign Travelers to Enter

“There are so many things to remember and organize,” she said as she sat on a bench in the departure terminal, refreshing her email feed every few minutes as she waited for her negative coronavirus test result. “It’s very stressful, but I know it’s going to be worth it when I see my children and […]

Read More

With Tears, Hugs and Balloons, U.S. Allows Vaccinated Foreign Travelers to Enter

“There are so many things to remember and organize,” she said as she sat on a bench in the departure terminal, refreshing her email feed every few minutes as she waited for her negative coronavirus test result. “It’s very stressful, but I know it’s going to be worth it when I see my children and […]

Read More

Covid-Related School Chaos Is a Problem for Democrats

In an environment like this, Republican proposals to subsidize private school tuition are likely to be received gratefully by many parents. It’s a perilous situation for Democrats, the party of public schools. If they want to stanch the bleeding, they should treat the rollout of the children’s Covid vaccine as an opportunity to make public […]

Read More

How to Think About the Covid Recession

Of course, this was because of the coronavirus. But it means that the recovery from past recessions doesn’t really say much about how the recovery will go now. Everyone is trying to predict when there will be a rebound in service sector industries that normally don’t decline, like health care, child care and education. That’s […]

Read More

Airports Are Scenes of Joyous Reunions as U.S. Reopens

As the United States reopened to fully vaccinated travelers from dozens of countries on Monday, it was a morning of joyous reunions, some hard-earned. Jolly Dave’s odyssey started last weekend, with a seven-hour bus ride from the Indian city of Gujarat to Mumbai. There she took a three-hour flight to New Delhi, then boarded a […]

Read More

October 2021 Jobs Report: Gain of 531,000 Offers Brighter Picture

“It’s a euphemism, but something the Fed takes very seriously,” said Diane Swonk, the chief economist at the accounting firm Grant Thornton. If the current surge in prices does not abate by early next year, and if both internal and external pressure to prioritize price stability takes precedence, then “patience may run out sooner than […]

Read More

Republicans Hit on Schools as a Wedge Issue to Unite the Party

Katie Paris, a party activist who runs Red, Wine and Blue, a group that works to mobilize suburban women, said that even as she warned that attacks over critical race theory had been “spreading like wildfire,” her pleas for resources had gone largely unanswered by party donors and officials. “These outside forces have come for […]

Read More

Republicans Pounce on Schools as a Wedge Issue to Unite the Party

Katie Paris, a party activist who runs a group that works to mobilize suburban women, said that even as she warned that attacks over critical race theory had been “spreading like wildfire,” her pleas for resources had gone largely unanswered by party donors and officials. “These outside forces have come for our schools and our […]

Read More

Covid Will Likely Be With Us Forever. We Need to Plan.

From his unique vantage point, Dr. Mokdad can literally map how our desire to prematurely claim victory, rather than accept the virus’s continuance, has led us to throw off restrictions, with deadly effect. He just revised his projected body count for the United States upward, to at least 828,000 total pandemic deaths by Feb. 1, […]

Read More

Return to Office Makes a Big Difference for Budding Lawyers

Ms. Singh, too, appeared to be under more stress. “I came in every day this week,” she said, estimating that she was arriving at work between 8:30 and 9 and staying until 6 or 7. “The hours have been a little longer than I expected.” But she seemed increasingly committed to the office. “It’s good […]

Read More