Tag: Colleges and Universities

San Jose State to Pay $1.6 Million to 13 Students in Sexual Harassment Case

San Jose State University has agreed to pay $1.6 million to 13 female student-athletes who alleged that they had been sexually harassed by a former athletic trainer, federal prosecutors and the university said on Tuesday. In a letter to California’s state university system, the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice concluded that […]

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San Jose State to Pay $1.6 Million to 13 Students in Sexual Harassment Case

San Jose State University has agreed to pay $1.6 million to 13 female student-athletes who alleged that they had been sexually harassed by a former athletic trainer, federal prosecutors and the university said on Tuesday. In a letter to California’s state university system, the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice concluded that […]

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The Cancel Culture Panic and Middle-Aged Sadness

“The Chair,” a Netflix comic drama about academia starring Sandra Oh, turns on a particularly absurd and unfair cancellation. In the first episode Bill, a onetime superstar English professor who’s falling apart after the death of his wife, is giving a lecture on modernism when, drawing a connection between fascism and absurdism, he gives a […]

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What the College Tenure Fight Is Really About

Harvard introduced the practice of prioritizing research in the criteria for up-or-out promotion and tenure in the late 1930s, under the presidency of James Conant — although faculty members at the time cautioned against his narrow emphasis on research. Other elite schools adopted the practice in the higher education boom years after World War II, […]

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In a Scheduling First, Pac-12 and SWAC Plan Home-and-Home Basketball Games

Pac-12 leaders similarly welcomed the home-and-home agreement, which Bernard Muir, Stanford’s athletic director, predicted would “open our eyes and our fan bases to an opportunity that we don’t traditionally get.” “Certainly, there’s games that occur between Power 5s and H.B.C.U.s, but to do this across the board in both conferences, I think it’s really unique,” […]

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Schools Reopen: Stories From Across Pandemic America

“They have to be extra careful with a lot of things,” she says after leaving him. “Hand sanitizer and everything — and not be too close with their friends or play like they used to before.” — Ivan Moreno Santa Monica, Calif. 8 a.m., Santa Monica High School A cheerleader approaches an entrance gate at […]

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Why Is Black Enrollment Falling at an Elite Southern University?

We know how to bring about greater student body diversity, because some public universities have done it. When the University of Texas, Austin, started admitting the top 10 percent of every high school graduating class in the state in the late 1990s, it created pathways for schools in more historically disadvantaged communities to send students […]

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Robert Gates Ran the Pentagon. Can He Help Save the N.C.A.A.?

The Supreme Court unanimously ruled against the N.C.A.A. in an antitrust case this summer, a signal event for many college sports officials, but Gates worried about the association’s future long before that decision. When he was president of Texas A&M, he considered the N.C.A.A. proficient at organizing championship events and maintaining national eligibility standards for […]

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What’s Changing in the New FAFSA and What’s Not

(While there has not been a draft since 1973, men ages 18 to 25 are still required by federal law to register. But FAFSA applicants will now remain eligible for financial aid even if they have not registered, said Mark Kantrowitz, a financial-aid expert.) The FAFSA collects financial details about students and their families and […]

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Former Georgetown Tennis Coach Agrees to Plead Guilty in Admissions Scandal

A former Georgetown University men’s and women’s tennis coach accused of soliciting and accepting bribes to help students get into the university was the latest person to agree to plead guilty Wednesday in an admissions investigation that has touched elite schools across the country, according to the U.S. attorney’s office for the District of Massachusetts. […]

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As College Admissions Trial Begins, Parents Claim They Were Duped

The government said on Monday that it did not intend to put Mr. Singer, who has pleaded guilty to racketeering, on the witness stand, but that the jury would hear his words on tape and in emails. The defense foreshadowed that it would try to show that Mr. Singer had been coerced by the government […]

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Two Parents Are the First to Face Trial in College Admissions Scandal

Mr. Singer told investigators that although the daughter played basketball in high school, she was not good enough to be recruited. So, according to the documents, Mr. Abdelaziz helped Mr. Singer put together a basketball profile to submit to U.S.C. that included falsified honors. With the help of Donna Heinel, U.S.C.’s former senior associate athletic […]

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Harvard Says It Will Not Invest in Fossil Fuels

Harvard University has announced that it “does not intend” to make any future investments in fossil fuels, and is winding down its legacy investments because, the university’s president, Lawrence S. Bacow, said in an email to the Harvard community, “climate change is the most consequential threat facing humanity.” The announcement, sent out on Thursday, is […]

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$10 Billion in Student Debt Erased Under Biden, but Calls Grow for More

Finally, on Tuesday, an email arrived saying she had receive a 100 percent discharge. “I cried,” said Ms. King, who hopes she can now afford computer classes at her local community college. The department appeared to have notified thousands of people about their loan relief on Tuesday, Mr. Gokey said. But confusion remains: Multiple people […]

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Men Fall Behind in College Enrollment. Women Still Play Catch-Up at Work.

The coronavirus upended the lives of millions of college students. The Wall Street Journal reported this week that men have been hit particularly hard — accounting for roughly three-fourths of pandemic-driven dropouts — and depicted an accelerating crisis in male enrollment. A closer look at historical trends and the labor market reveals a more complex […]

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China Increasing Rejects English, and Outside Ideas

As a student at Peking University law school in 1978, Li Keqiang kept both pockets of his jacket stuffed with handwritten paper slips. An English word was written on one side, a former classmate recalled, and the matching Chinese version was written on the other. Mr. Li, now China’s premier, was part of China’s English-learning […]

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Terry Brennan, Youthful Notre Dame Football Coach, Dies at 93

The Indiana Catholic and Record, the newspaper of the Archdiocese of Indianapolis, said that the real losers in Brennan’s firing were “the priests and laymen at Notre Dame who were trying, successfully, we believe, to remake the public image of Notre Dame from football factory to first-class university.” Terence Patrick Brennan was born on June […]

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One Thing We Can Agree on Is That We’re Becoming a Different Country

In Kaufmann’s view, a new, assertive ideology has emerged on the left, and the strength of this wing is reflected in its ability to influence the decision making of university administrators: In universities, only 10 percent of social science and humanities faculty support cancellation (firing, suspension or other severe punishments) of those with controversial views […]

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How Educational Differences Are Widening America’s Political Rift

At the same time, the party’s old industrial working-class base was in decline, as were the unions and machine bosses who once had the power to connect the party’s politicians to its rank and file. The party had little choice but to broaden its appeal, and it adopted the views of college-educated voters on nearly […]

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Howard University Hit by a Ransomware Attack

Howard University, one of the country’s leading historically Black colleges and universities, canceled some classes for a second day after it was hit with a ransomware attack. All online and hybrid undergraduate classes are suspended for Wednesday, according to a statement by the university. All in-person classes in Washington will resume as scheduled. The university […]

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How Professors Are Handling Unmasked Students Amid Delta

Matthew Boedy, an associate professor of rhetoric and composition, sent out a raw emotional appeal to his students at the University of North Georgia just before classes began: The Covid-19 Delta variant was rampaging through the state, filling up hospital beds. He would teach class in the equivalent of full body armor — vaccinated and […]

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Ole Miss Coach Lane Kiffin Tests Positive for Coronavirus

Lane Kiffin, the head football coach at the University of Mississippi, said Saturday that he had tested positive for the coronavirus and would miss Monday night’s game against the University of Louisville, the season opener for both. Every player and coach in the Mississippi football program is fully vaccinated — a point of pride for […]

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The Real Problem with Sex Between Professors and Students

Consider mandatory arrest laws, which require the police to make an arrest whenever they suspect an act of domestic violence. As many Black and Latina feminists predicted in the 1980s, when these policies began to be implemented, such laws increased the incidence of domestic violence against women of color; numerous studies have shown that retaliatory […]

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A New Kind of Homecoming All Over College Football

ALBUQUERQUE — Normalcy, or what passes for it these days, started for Louis Trujillo when he arrived around 6 a.m. on Thursday to tailgate at the University of New Mexico. Ordinary came for Yolanda Sanchez when she began her shift in a stadium parking lot at 7 a.m., and for Andrew Erickson, a Lobos wide […]

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Why Does New York State Sue Its College Students?

“For the past decade, prices have been going up, but the amount of funding students get has stayed flat, and that leaves a gap in their bills,” said Beth Todd, director of student accounts at SUNY Potsdam. “It’s also a question of financial literacy. Students who withdraw don’t always understand that after four weeks of […]

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N.Y. Students Hope Vaccine Mandates Bring College Life Back to Normal

“I think for any prospective students who are looking at coming back to New York City and in-person activities in general, it’s definitely viewed as a path forward,” said Mira Silveira, 21, a rising senior at New York University. More than 100 New York colleges have a mandate in place, according to a tracker from […]

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Over 60,000 Fake Applications Submitted in Student Aid Scheme, California Says

For the briefest of moments, Adriana Brogger entertained the idea that her Instagram posts and other marketing efforts over the summer had caused an explosion in enrollment in the journalism class she teaches at a California community college, to 85 students from 15 only days before. “For, like, half a second,” the professor said. “Then […]

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Nick Saban Answers Questions on Football and College Sports

In college, we revenue produce. We have 21 sports — I don’t know how many hundreds of student-athletes we have on scholarship — and most of those sports create no revenue. But the sports that create revenue make it possible for all of those sports to exist. We reinvest all the resources, all the income, […]

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The New Chief Chaplain at Harvard? An Atheist.

“When the pandemic hit I was like, ‘Greg, do you have time to talk about the meaning of life,’” Ms. Goldenberg recalled. “He showed me that it’s possible to find community outside a traditional religious context, that you can have the value-add religion has provided for centuries, which is that it’s there when things seem […]

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A.C.C., Big Ten and Pac-12 Form Coalition to Counter SEC’s Might

In search of a way to curb the Southeastern Conference’s swelling power, three of the wealthiest college sports leagues — the Atlantic Coast, Big Ten and Pac-12 conferences — said Tuesday that they had formed a coalition to navigate a turbulent era. Beyond a “scheduling alliance” that could eventually produce more marquee matchups in basketball […]

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