Tag: Cancer

Imaging Contrast Dye Shortage Delays Tests for Diseases

Doctors cannot seem to pinpoint what is wrong with Michael Quintos. Mr. Quintos, 53, a Chicago resident, has constant stomach pain. He has been hospitalized, and his doctors have tried everything including antibiotics, antacids, even removing his appendix. “I still don’t feel good,” Mr. Quintos said. His doctors recommend using a CT scan with contrast, […]

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Can artificial intelligence overcome the challenges of the health care system?

Even as rapid improvements in artificial intelligence have led to speculation over significant changes in the health care landscape, the adoption of AI in health care has been minimal. A 2020 survey by Brookings, for example, found that less than 1 percent of job postings in health care required AI-related skills. The Abdul Latif Jameel […]

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Plastics: “The New Coal”

Plastics are ubiquitous. They’ve yielded life-saving medical advances, supercharged technological advancements, helped send us to space, and transformed our lives in innumerable ways. But they are poisoning our people and our planet. Move over, Industrial Age. Welcome to the Plastics Age. The Human Cost You, yes you, literally consume a credit card’s worth of plastic […]

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Black Communities Need To Speak More Openly About Their Health

NewsOne Featured Video Source: Alex Wong / Getty Over the past year, the fight for voting rights has felt like an epic struggle. Since early 2021, when a Republican-led voter suppression effort in Georgia gave way to copycat legislation all across the US, my organization Black Voters Matter, and hundreds of local and national partners […]

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Most Genome Data Comes from White Folks. Scientists Are Trying to Fix That.

Precision medicine, which aims to tailor medicine to each individual for better outcomes, is fueled by genomic data. Unfortunately, there’s a problem with the fuel. For the past couple of decades, genomic databases have been filled with information gathered from people of European descent — and precious little from other ancestries. That means white people […]

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Tracing a cancer’s family tree to its roots reveals how tumors grow

Over time, cancer cells can evolve to become resistant to treatment, more aggressive, and metastatic — capable of spreading to additional sites in the body and forming new tumors. The more of these traits that a cancer evolves, the more deadly it becomes. Researchers want to understand how cancers evolve these traits in order to […]

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LifeOmic and XCure team up to identify better cancer treatment options

We are excited to bring Transform 2022 back in-person July 19 and virtually July 20 – 28. Join AI and data leaders for insightful talks and exciting networking opportunities. Register today! LifeOmic, a precision health platform, and XCures, which helps identify cancer treatment options, have partnered to streamline and improve recommendations for cancer care. The […]

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Ultrasound Waves Destroy Cancerous Tumors Near Definitively

The University of Michigan published a fascinating article about how ultrasound technology could become a non-invasive treatment that destroys cancerous tumors with “millimeter precision.” That sure beats the prospect of having the surgical alternative. This kind of technology is called histotripsy and consists of sending targeted short acoustic energy bursts that will cause stress and […]

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Fighting for Her Life, Far From Ukraine

A 5-year-old Ukrainian girl with a brain tumor was one of several children brought for treatment in the United States after their country was invaded by Russia. April 17, 2022 MEMPHIS — When Russia invaded Ukraine, Marija Pyzhyk was still worried mainly about her 5-year-old daughter, Khrystyna, who was being treated for a brain tumor. […]

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A Promising Vaccine Candidate for the Immunocompromised

The Covid pandemic has been something of a double whammy for people with compromised immune systems: not only are they at higher risk for severe disease and death if they get infected, but they are less likely to achieve strong protection from widely-available vaccines. In the U.S., some 9 million are immunocompromised. They are cancer […]

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The Fact of Mortality

Here, alas, the film goes into an unduly long coda. When the doomed man begins his mission, we jump ahead to a wake held for him after his death. Various speeches are made at his funeral feast, there are numerous flashbacks filling us in on what happened between the last time we saw him alive […]

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Cancer Patients Are at High Risk of Depression and Suicide, Studies Find

One day years ago, during her training in neurology, Dr. Corinna Seliger-Behme met a man with end-stage bladder cancer. Before the diagnosis, the man had a stable family and job, and no history of mental health problems, Dr. Seliger-Behme recalled. But, soon after learning of his terminal disease, he tried to kill himself with a […]

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Pfizer Recalls Some Blood Pressure Drugs, Citing Cancer Risk

Pfizer is recalling some shipments of its blood pressure drug Accuretic, as well as authorized generic versions of the medication, saying that a cancer-causing compound in those lots exceeded the acceptable daily intake level. The compound in the medication is nitrosamine, which is also found in water and beer as well as some foods including […]

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Bridging the worlds of research and industry

Graduate student Nidhi Juthani was not content with just one graduate degree. Instead, she decided to earn two in one fell swoop, via MIT’s PhD in Chemical Engineering Practice (PhDCEP) program, which allows her to obtain a doctorate and an MBA concurrently. The combination is a perfect fit for Juthani, who wants to pursue a […]

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Jane Brody: Here’s How Health Advice Changed Since I Joined The Times

Surgery. Early in my career, radical mastectomy was the gold standard for treating breast cancer, and I recall saying that would be my choice if I got this disease. Little by little, through large, costly clinical trials, this body-deforming operation has been almost entirely replaced by early detection and minimal surgery, often followed by radiation […]

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A Breakthrough Cancer Therapy Targets Autoimmune Diseases

Clinical researchers have made remarkable progress toward one of science’s most important goals: finding novel ways to treat or even cure disease with our own immune systems. Most of the medical advances we rely on — including things like antibiotics to conquer infection or organ transplants that replace essential biological functions — harness mechanisms that […]

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My Housecleaner Is Sick a Lot. Do I Have to Stick With Her?

In a more equitable society, with a more finely woven social-safety net, someone with a frequently disabling migraine would be able to secure employment more compatible with her condition or to qualify for disability benefits. (The main public programs require total disability, have various eligibility requirements and frequently reject migraine sufferers.) In ours, we end […]

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Probing how proteins pair up inside cells

Despite its minute size, a single cell contains billions of molecules that bustle around and bind to one another, carrying out vital functions. The human genome encodes about 20,000 proteins, most of which interact with partner proteins to mediate upwards of 400,000 distinct interactions. These partners don’t just latch onto one another haphazardly; they only […]

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Why the Chemical Industry Is an Overlooked Climate Foe — and What to Do About It

Climate change is quickly evolving into climate catastrophe, and there’s a narrow window of time to do something about it. While the world works on solutions, there’s surprisingly little focus on the chemical industry, which accounts for roughly 7% of global greenhouse gas emissions — as well as other environmental harms. Weak or nonexistent regulations of the […]

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A Cancer Treatment Makes Leukemia Vanish, but Creates More Mysteries

After the CD8 cells did their job, they remained in the blood but, unexpectedly, they turned into CD4 cells. And when the Penn investigators removed CD4 cells from the blood of Mr. Ludwig and Mr. Olson, they saw that those cells could kill B cells in the laboratory. The CD4 cells had turned into assassins […]

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Biden to Present Plan to Cut Cancer Death Rate in Half

WASHINGTON — President Biden will unveil a plan on Wednesday to reduce the death rate from cancer by at least 50 percent over the next 25 years — an ambitious new goal, senior administration officials say, for the cancer “moonshot” program he initiated and presided over five years ago as vice president. Mr. Biden and […]

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After a Mastectomy, Moving Between Gratitude and Grief

During my breast reconstruction, the plastic surgeon suctioned fat from my thighs and flanks and inserted it around the implants to make them appear more natural. It left my thighs dark purple with bruises, the pain far worse than I’d imagined. Over time, the bruises disappeared, but so did the fat placed around the implants; […]

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After Colleyville, What Does Hope Look Like for Jewish Parents?

In congregations like my own, we do not use our phones on Shabbat, so we were unaware that around the time Orli began to recite from the Torah, 1,300 miles away, at Congregation Beth Israel in Colleyville, Texas, a man had taken the rabbi and congregants hostage. Later that night, when we learned what was […]

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Seeing into the future: Personalized cancer screening with artificial intelligence

While mammograms are currently the gold standard in breast cancer screening, swirls of controversy exist regarding when and how often they should be administered. On the one hand, advocates argue for the ability to save lives: Women aged 60-69 who receive mammograms, for example, have a 33 percent lower risk of dying compared to those […]

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Method for delivering immune system-stimulating drugs may enhance cancer immunotherapy

Stimulating the body’s immune system to attack tumors is a promising way to treat cancer. Scientists are working on two complementary strategies to achieve that: taking off the brakes that tumors put on the immune system; and “stepping on the gas,” or delivering molecules that jumpstart immune cells. However, when jumpstarting the immune system, researchers […]

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Drinking Alcohol and Cancer: Should Your Cocktail Carry a Cancer Warning?

Scientists have known that alcohol promotes cancer for several decades. The World Health Organization first classified alcohol consumption as cancer-causing in 1987. Experts say that all types of alcoholic beverages can increase cancer risk because they all contain ethanol, which can cause DNA damage, oxidative stress and cell proliferation. Ethanol is metabolized by the body […]

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Are Mammograms Worthwhile for Older Women?

Then there are data from an analysis of 763,256 mammography screenings done between 2007 and 2017 that found cancer in 3,944 women, 10 percent of whom were 75 and older. The study’s author, Dr. Stamatia Destounis, radiologist at Elizabeth Wende Breast Care in Rochester, N.Y., reported that most of the cancers in the older women […]

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10 Ways to Lower the Cancer Risk of Grilling

Many people would be surprised to hear that grilling carries potential cancer risks. But each year, the American Institute for Cancer Research publishes guidance for “cancer-safe grilling,” cautioning consumers to avoid two types of compounds that have been tied to cancer. These compounds, called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic amines, get generated when food, especially […]

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When to Tell Daughters About a Genetic Breast Cancer Risk

Dr. Jill Stoller, a pediatrician in New Jersey who carries a BRCA mutation, decided to tell her daughter, Jenna, then an eighth grader, about the family risk while planning for surgery after a breast cancer diagnosis. “I felt I had to give her context for the major surgery I was having.” In the ensuing years […]

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