Tag: Black People

Claudette Colvin, Civil Rights Pioneer, Seeks to Have Her Record Cleared

Ka-Santa Sanders, who lives in the King Hill neighborhood in Montgomery, where Ms. Colvin grew up, and has led the efforts to protect Ms. Colvin’s legacy, asked the city earlier this year if anything could be done to honor her and the pivotal role she played in the fight for civil rights. “Immediately, we started […]

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Acrylic Nails Get the Fine Art Treatment

For most New Yorkers, most of the time, Times Square is a challenge. Walking through the crowds of tourists, vendors, break dancing crews, and multiple Elmos and Iron Mans can be daunting when you’re just trying to make it to work. But it’s also disturbing to see the area nearly cleared out, as it was […]

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The Student Body Is Deaf and Diverse. The School’s Leadership Is Neither.

Student protests over the hiring of a white hearing superintendent have roiled a school for the deaf that serves mostly Black and Hispanic students in the Atlanta area and have focused attention on whether school leaders should better reflect the identities of their students. The Atlanta Area School for the Deaf, run by the Georgia […]

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Utah School District Ignored Racial Harassment for Years, Report Says

In October 2019, a white elementary school student dressed up as Hitler for Halloween, giving the Nazi salute as he marched in a parade through the hallways, the department said. Staff members did not stop him or report him to the school’s administrators, the report said. Sometimes, white students would demand that their Black peers […]

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Baseball, Popular but No Longer Dominant, Seeks to Reclaim Its Cool

In 1981, over 18 percent of major league players were Black. That figure held until 1986, when it began a steady decline. While almost 30 percent of M.L.B. players in 2021 were Latino, only 7 percent were Black, and as a result, the sport seems more disconnected from Black audiences than in decades past. Those […]

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Remove a Confederate Statue? A Tennessee City Did This Instead.

FRANKLIN, Tenn. — For decades, when Hewitt Sawyers drove past the monument of the Confederate soldier standing tall in his city’s public square, he felt the weight of slavery’s long shadow. Mr. Sawyers, 73, had attended a segregated school in Franklin, about 20 miles south of Nashville. He read from torn books passed down from […]

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Byron Lewis, the Original Black Media Mogul

Despite this pedigree, the magazine did not survive into the third quarter of 1961. As far as Mr. Lewis understands, the only copies of it that exist today are those on the table of his living room in the TriBeCa building he bought in 1990. A while back someone he knew found copies at a […]

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As Broadway Returns, Shows Rethink and Restage Depictions of Race

“The Lehman Trilogy,” about the rise and fall of a financial family, added new references to the businessmen’s relationship to slavery after earlier versions of the play were criticized for playing down that connection. “Everything that was built here was built on a crime,” a character now warns. Broadway is addressing concerns about race in […]

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Who Is Eric Adams? That Depends.

Yet like any worthy storyteller, Mr. Adams has made choices about what to emphasize and what to elide, carefully guarding certain pieces of himself and working to recast others. When his mother died earlier this year, he surprised friends by not publicly revealing it for months, even as he continued speaking about her on the […]

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His First Art Was Graffiti. Now His Pottery Is in the Met.

This article is part of our latest Fine Arts & Exhibits special report, about how art institutions are helping audiences discover new options for the future. Many times while he was studying art, and later as a working ceramist, Roberto Lugo was told he was out of place or that his work was somehow not […]

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Why New York City Is Trying to Preserve a Crumbling Church

Grace Congregational Church does not have many members these days, but the dozen or so people who do worship at the century-old building on a quiet Harlem side street like to get there early. They climb the crumbling steps into the humble brick church and find seats on the aging wooden pews, where sheets of […]

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Online Furor Over a Student’s Hijab Engulfs a Liberal Town

The student returned to school on Monday, her lawyer, Robert L. Tarver, said. Her mother, Cassandra Wyatt, who also wears a hijab, appeared Thursday at a news conference arranged by Mr. Tarver but did not comment. She has told ABC-7 Eyewitness News that her daughter no longer wanted to wear a head scarf. “The teacher […]

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Jerry Pinkney, Acclaimed Children’s Book Illustrator, Dies at 81

Jerry Pinkney, whose evocative illustrations won acclaim in bringing more than 100 children’s books to life, many with Black characters or images of Black history and culture, died on Wednesday in Sleepy Hollow, N.Y. He was 81. His daughter-in-law Andrea Davis Pinkney said his death, at Phelps Hospital, was caused by a heart attack. He […]

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Colin Powell Was My Thurgood Marshall

Ten years ago, in a townhouse near the White House, I was a somewhat star-struck young naval officer listening to Colin Powell talk about, of all things, squirrels. He was visiting with my class of White House fellows — Mr. Powell himself was the program’s most notable alum. He recounted an Oval Office meeting with […]

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‘Thoughts of a Colored Man,’ From University to Broadway

Plays by August Wilson were nowhere to be found in the syllabuses of Frostburg State University’s theater classes when Keenan Scott II attended the Maryland school in the mid-2000s. Nor were works by Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, Adrienne Kennedy or Lynn Nottage. But there was Ntozake Shange’s pioneering “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide/When […]

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How Republicans Are Weaponizing Critical Race Theory Ahead of Midterms

In July, Glenn Youngkin, the Republican nominee for governor of Virginia, promised to abolish critical race theory on “day one” in office. In Florida, Gov. Ron DeSantis, facing re-election next year, said recently, “I want to make sure people are not supporting critical race theory.” And in Arizona, Blake Masters, a Republican hoping to unseat […]

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Ashley M. Jones Is Named Poet Laureate in Alabama

When she started writing “Reparations Now!” she did not yet know what the title would be, but she wrote what was on her mind: the condition of being Black in America. In “The Kid Next to Me at the 7pm Showing of The Avengers Has a Toy Gun,” a boy talks and pretends to shoot […]

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Blacktag, a New Streaming Service, Has Big Plans

When Ousman Sahko Sow and Akin Adebowale founded Blacktag in 2019, they sought to answer two questions: What would a streaming platform for a digitally savvy Black audience look like? And how could it become a destination for Black talent? It turns out both answers have a lot to do with pay. “What we’re building […]

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N.F.L. Concussion Settlement to Eliminate Race as Factor

Fewer than 700 of the more than 2,000 dementia-related claims have been approved in the settlement. The settlement also pays former players found to have Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, A.L.S. and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or C.T.E., which can only be diagnosed posthumously. At least half of all former N.F.L. players are Black and roughly 70 […]

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Sheriff Is Charged With Falsely Accusing Black Newspaper Carrier of Threats

A sitting sheriff in Washington State has been charged with making a false claim that a Black man had driven up to his home and threatened to kill him, prosecutors said. Sheriff Ed Troyer of Pierce County called 911 in January 2021 to report that he had used his S.U.V. to corner a man who […]

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M.I.T.’s Choice of Lecturer Ignited Criticism. So Did Its Decision to Cancel.

CHICAGO — The Massachusetts Institute of Technology invited the geophysicist Dorian Abbot to give a prestigious public lecture this autumn. He seemed a natural choice, a scientific star who studies climate change and whether planets in distant solar systems might harbor atmospheres conducive to life. Then a swell of angry resistance arose. Some faculty members […]

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From Henry Louis Gates Jr., Another Scholarly Megaproject

The career of the literary scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr. has been marked by a series of intellectual megaprojects, from the landmark 30-volume Schomburg Library of Nineteeth-Century Black Women Writers (1988) and the Norton Anthology of African-American Literature (1996), to the five-volume Africana encyclopedia (2000), and three mammoth biographical dictionaries featuring some 10,000 notable figures […]

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For Sharon D Clarke, a ‘Big Sing’ and a Big Broadway Moment

“Every time Rose calls her Carolyn, I make her flinch,” Clarke said. “Every time.” The daughter of a seamstress and a carpenter, Clarke sees playing Caroline as “a chance to honor all maids, all women, all single mothers, all Black women trying to make their way through this life.” “In a way for me,” she […]

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The Secret Toll of Racial Ambiguity

Being a symbol of racial and cultural optimism is a strange sign to live under. Your beauty signifies the rightness of the coming transition, its aesthetic balance; your flexibility, empathy and intermingled whiteness comfort those who fear the loss of place or privilege in the coming demographic shift. You are a bridge between the genes […]

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Elijah McClain’s Family Reaches Settlement With City of Aurora, Colo.

The family of Elijah McClain, a 23-year-old Black man who died in 2019 after the police in Aurora, Colo., restrained him with a chokehold maneuver that has since been banned, has reached a settlement with the city, an official and lawyers for his parents said on Tuesday. Ryan Luby, a spokesman for the city of […]

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Iowa Democratic Chair Says He Received Lynching Threat After Criticizing Trump

Iowa’s Democratic Party chair said on Tuesday that he received a lynching threat and several other racist phone and email messages after he wrote a column in the state’s largest newspaper denouncing former President Donald J. Trump and Republicans. The party chairman, Ross Wilburn, the first Black person to lead the Democratic Party in Iowa, […]

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Assessing the Legacy of Colin Powell

To the Editor: Re “Colin L. Powell, 1937-2021: Model Diplomat Haunted by the Iraq War” (obituary, front page, Oct. 19): True, Colin Powell was haunted by the war in Iraq, but for most Americans he rose far above those problematic scenes of his testimony before the United Nations. He was a man whose name invokes […]

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How ‘Fire Shut Up in My Bones’ Brought Step to the Met

Camille A. Brown had a lot of catching up to do. She wasn’t part of the original creative team behind Terence Blanchard’s opera “Fire Shut Up in My Bones” when it was presented in 2019 in St. Louis. But at the Metropolitan Opera, where the production runs through Saturday — the first time a work […]

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Multiple Myeloma, The Cancer Colin Powell Had, Is A ‘Silent Killer’ Of Black People

NewsOne Featured Video Most of the headlines for news articles about Colin Powell‘s death included the fact that he died following complications from COVID-19. But buried deeper in the story is the fact that the war hero who was also the first Black U.S. secretary of state had been suffering from multiple myeloma, a cancer […]

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The Life and Career of Colin Powell

Robert Draper contributed reporting. The Daily is made by Lisa Tobin, Rachel Quester, Lynsea Garrison, Annie Brown, Clare Toeniskoetter, Paige Cowett, Michael Simon Johnson, Brad Fisher, Larissa Anderson, Wendy Dorr, Chris Wood, Jessica Cheung, Stella Tan, Alexandra Leigh Young, Lisa Chow, Eric Krupke, Marc Georges, Luke Vander Ploeg, M.J. Davis Lin, Austin Mitchell, Neena Pathak, […]

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After Del Rio, Calls for Fairer Treatment of Black Migrants

Regardless, the images of agents on horseback drew such a visceral reaction not just from immigration advocates, but also from Black Americans and powerful civil rights organizations like the N.A.A.C.P., that many see this as a moment to effect change. “The connections have been made for Black people,” said Judith Browne Dianis, the executive director […]

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