Tag: Affordable Housing

Is the Chance to Turn Hotels Into Affordable Housing Slipping Away?

Soon after Covid devastated the New York hotel industry in the spring of 2020, politicians, developers and homeless services groups arrived at a rare consensus: This was a once-in-a-generation chance to convert struggling hotels into affordable housing. In California, which faced a similar situation during the pandemic, government agencies have helped to convert 120 sites, […]

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How Austin Became One of the Least Affordable Cities in America

AUSTIN — Over the last few years, in one of the fastest-growing cities in America, change has come at a feverish pace to the capital of Texas, with churches demolished, mobile home parks razed and neighborhood haunts replaced with trendy restaurants and luxury apartment complexes. The transformation has perhaps been most acutely felt across East […]

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Revitalizing Black Neighborhoods by Preserving Their History

Jevonte Porter grew up hearing family stories about a bustling era of arts and business in the Orange Mound section of Memphis. After World War II, locals flocked to performance spaces like the W.C. Handy Theater; those without tickets often sold hot dogs or other goods on the busy streets outside venues. To Mr. Porter, […]

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Liberal Hypocrisy Is Fueling Inequality

It’s easy to blame the other side. And for many Democrats, it’s obvious that Republicans are thwarting progress toward a more equal society. But what happens when Republicans aren’t standing in the way? In many states — including California, New York and Illinois — Democrats control all the levers of power. They run the government. […]

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In a Supertall Tower, How Much Affordable Housing Is Enough?

One option could be Project-Based Section 8, a renewable federal subsidy typically for those making less than 50 percent of the area median income, although that would likely apply only to some tenants. Another approach could involve tax-exempt bonds, including 501(c)(3) bonds, a rarely used financing tool, Ms. Lamberg said, or a new allocation of […]

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Desperate for Housing Options, Communities Turn to Ballot Initiatives

LEADVILLE, Colo. — A small-business owner in a town fueled by vacationers is an unconventional proponent for a tax hike on tourists. But Marcee Lundeen sees few other choices. Gearing up for ski season at her restaurant along the main drag of this fabled mining town perched at 10,000 feet between clusters of resorts, she […]

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Biden and Democrats will announce progress on a framework for their social policy and climate bill, but key details remain unresolved.

President Biden will go to the Capitol on Thursday to announce progress on a “framework” agreement for a social safety net and climate change bill that would most likely bolster support for child care and early childhood education while coaxing the economy away from fossil fuels. Details were still unclear on the precise shape of […]

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Hellishly Hot Tiny Town Offers ‘Free’ Land. Hundreds of Calls Came In.

MELBOURNE, Australia — From the air, the tiny outback town of Quilpie, Queensland, appears to be in the middle of nowhere. It lies on dusty land the color of rust. About 20 kangaroos sometimes take up residence on the school lawn. Summer temperatures can reach 113 degrees Fahrenheit. The nearest city is a 10-hour drive […]

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Is This the Cure for the Loneliness of American Motherhood?

If there is an adage that informs life in co-housing, it’s treat thy neighbor as thy family. Thy extended family, that is, assuming it’s a happy one. And what do happy families do? For one thing, they share stuff. As Rabbi Kimelman-Block led me through what felt like a labyrinth, he opened several overstuffed “sharing […]

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Why New York City Is Trying to Preserve a Crumbling Church

Grace Congregational Church does not have many members these days, but the dozen or so people who do worship at the century-old building on a quiet Harlem side street like to get there early. They climb the crumbling steps into the humble brick church and find seats on the aging wooden pews, where sheets of […]

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Some Tenants in Los Angeles May Lose the City Councilwoman They Elected

You might assume that given Park La Brea’s numbers — it is home, after all, to 12,000 residents — it wouldn’t be at risk of losing political influence. But organizing these voters to turn out can be challenging. Homeowners will always have a set of advantages over renters: They stay in the same place for […]

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A Home Built for the Next Pandemic

The dual fridge The Covid concept home reflected the idea that American middle-class families need to stockpile food and supplies. The home has two full-size modern refrigerators, one in the kitchen, and one just off the kitchen, in the laundry room. Second fridges are not uncommon in American homes, but they have not been thought […]

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Funding Fight Threatens Plan to Pump Billions Into Affordable Housing

A few years ago she was told that a voucher was about to become available, but that fell through, and she has spent much of the past 13 years hopping from apartment to apartment. Last spring, Ms. Sylve moved in with her daughter across the bay in San Francisco, because the neighborhood around her apartment […]

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In the Bronx, Mott Haven Suddenly Gets a Skyline

There is also the fear that rising prices of housing — and also staples like groceries — will force out longtime residents. “Gentrification is definitely a concern,” said Nöelle Santos, 34, the Bronx-born owner of the Lit. Bar, a two-year-old bookstore on Alexander Avenue. “Are the people whom I set out to serve still going […]

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California Homeowners Flex Their Political Muscle

Some may roll their eyes at the thought that a coalition of mostly affluent homeowners could qualify as “grass roots,” a term more commonly associated with social justice movements. But they would be wrong: Throughout his four-decade reign, Close and SOHA have consistently out-organized, out-hustled and outmaneuvered their political opponents. In the 1980s, Close and […]

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San Antonio’s Challenge: Balancing Growth With Heritage

When the 23-story Frost Tower opened in downtown San Antonio in 2019, the eight-sided pinwheel of glass represented a resurgent decade of downtown development. It was the city’s first new office tower in three decades. For Randy Smith, chief executive of Weston Urban, one of the developers behind the project, it was the beginning of […]

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Secretary Marcia Fudge Highlights New Program To Combat Homelessness And Support ‘Entire Person’

NewsOne Featured Video Source: Tom Williams / Getty Secretary Marcia Fudge recently sat down with NewsOne to discuss the new housing agenda, House America, and steps being taken by the Biden administration to support the whole person. In the launch of House America, figures released by the Department of Housing and Urban Development indicated 580,466 […]

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‘The Moratorium Saved Us. It Really Did.’

If the main lessons we take from the eviction moratorium have to do with how to configure a better moratorium for the next national emergency, we will have failed. We should be dedicating ourselves to building a better housing system, one that ensures we don’t face an eviction crisis come next pandemic — or next […]

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The Role for State Governments in the Housing Crisis

A friend of mine, who is very much on your side of the political aisle, said there’s this challenge that all Yimbys have: You’re basically acting as activists and lobbyists to allow real estate companies to build more housing. He said — and I agree — that while that might be the right move, it’s […]

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