Megan Thee Stallion’s ‘Thot Sh*t’ Is At The Center Of A TikTok Strike By Black Creators

Usually, when a universally beloved rapper like Megan Thee Stallion releases a seismic new single such as “Thot Sh*t,” her most recent effort that already has conservatives shaking their proverbial fists, creators on TikTok have a field day inventing viral dance challenges that then become emblematic of a song’s success. It’s worked for Cardi B, with both her songs “WAP” (which also features Meg) and “Up,” and it’s worked for Doja Cat, whose “Say So” and “Streets” were subjects of inescapable dance crazes (and sultry backlit boudoir shoots).

However, there has been no skyrocketing trend for “Thot Sh*t,” which by most accounts is already every bit as popular as any of Megan’s other hits. According to Mashable, that’s because Black TikTokers are now refusing to create one, citing the tendency of non-Black users to co-opt and water down their efforts, which tends to lead to the aforementioned trends. With Black TikTokers — the originators of many of the most popular dances — “striking,” none the videos under the “Thot Sh*t” sound have taken off as in the past.

Observers have noted the discrepancy in attention since the app’s explosion in popularity a couple of years ago. While influencers like Addison Rae, Charlie D’Amelio, and others receive mainstream exposure and opportunities for essentially copying the already popular dances, the originators tend to go overlooked. See: The NBA’s 2020 All-Star Weekend, where the “Renegade” challenge to K Camp’s “Lottery” was in evidence throughout the broadcast, but Jalaiah Harmon, the 14-year-old who choreographed it in the first place, was nowhere to be found.

Of course, Twitter users took note of the dearth of content, and the results… well… you can see them below. What’s the solution? Ultimately, that will have to be left to the content creators themselves, but for one thing, it would seem all the record deals, television appearances, and paid performances should ultimately be going to the folks who form the engine that drives TikTok and turns hits into ubiquitous pop cultural phenomenons.

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