Tag: Water

Illustrating India’s complex environmental crises

Abhijit Banerjee, the Ford Foundation International Professor of Economics at MIT, and Sarnath Banerjee (no relation), an MIT Center for Art, Science, and Technology (CAST) visiting artist share a similar background, but have very different ways of thinking. Both were raised for a time in Kolkata before leaving India to pursue divergent careers, Abhijit as […]

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MADMEC winner creates “temporary tattoos” for T-shirts

Have you ever gotten a free T-shirt at an event that you never wear? What about a music or sports-themed shirt you wear to one event and then lose interest in entirely? Such one-off T-shirts — and the waste and pollution associated with them — are an unfortunately common part of our society. But what […]

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Big Companies Cashed In on Mississippi’s Water. Small Towns Paid the Price.

In winter 2021, more than 150,000 people living in Jackson, Miss., were left without running water. Faucets were dry or dribbling a muddy brown. For weeks, people across the city lost the water they normally relied on to drink, cook and bathe. With no way to flush their toilets, some parents sent their children into […]

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Where Groundwater Levels Are Falling, and Rising, Worldwide

An investigation into nearly 1,700 aquifers across more than 40 countries found that groundwater levels in almost half have fallen since 2000. Only about 7 percent of the aquifers surveyed had groundwater levels that rose over that same time period. The new study is one of the first to compile data from monitoring wells around […]

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As Switzerland’s Glaciers Shrink, a Way of Life May Melt Away

For centuries, Swiss farmers have sent their cattle, goats and sheep up the mountains to graze in warmer months before bringing them back down at the start of autumn. Devised in the Middle Ages to save precious grass in the valleys for winter stock, the tradition of “summering” has so transformed the countryside into a […]

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California Farms Dried Up a River for Months. Nobody Stopped Them.

During California’s most recent drought, officials went to great lengths to safeguard water supplies, issuing emergency regulations to curb use by thousands of farms, utilities and irrigation districts. It still wasn’t enough to prevent growers in the state’s agricultural heartland from draining dry several miles of a major river for almost four months in 2022, […]

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K. Lisa Yang Global Engineering and Research Center will prioritize innovations for resource-constrained communities

Billions of people worldwide face threats to their livelihood, health, and well-being due to poverty. These problems persist because solutions offered in developed countries often do not meet the requirements — related to factors like price, performance, usability, robustness, and culture — of poor or developing countries. Academic labs frequently try to tackle these challenges, […]

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A new way to swiftly eliminate micropollutants from water

“Zwitterionic” might not be a word you come across every day, but for Professor Patrick Doyle of the MIT Department of Chemical Engineering, it’s a word that’s central to the technology his group is developing to remove micropollutants from water. Derived from the German word “zwitter,” meaning “hybrid,” “zwitterionic” molecules are those with an equal […]

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Colorado River States Are Racing to Agree on Cuts Before Inauguration Day

The states that rely on the Colorado River, which is shrinking because of climate change and overuse, are rushing to agree on a long-term deal to share the dwindling resource by the end of the year. They worry that a change in administrations after the election could set back talks. Negotiators are seeking an agreement […]

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Indiana’s Plan to Pipe In Groundwater for Microchip-Making Draws Fire

When Indiana officials created a new industrial park to lure huge microchip firms to the state, they picked a nearly 10,000-acre site close to a booming metropolis, a major airport and a university research center. But the area is missing one key ingredient to support the kinds of development the state wants to attract: access […]

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Sheco Swarm Water-Drones Pioneering Large-Scale Pollution Removal

SHECO (official site) is a startup which produces largescale pollution-removal solutions for public waters or various industrial environments such as ports, shipyards, industrial plants etc. located nearby bodies of water at risk. Water-pollution events only make it to the evening news when they are large or catastrophic. Every day, there are about 3200 “pollution incidents” […]

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Don’t Flee the American Southwest Just Yet

This summer, when the temperature hit 110 degrees Fahrenheit or above in Phoenix for 31 straight days, many were fretting about the Southwest’s prospects in the age of climate change. A writer for The Atlantic asked, “When Will the Southwest Become Unlivable?” The Washington Post wondered, “How Long Can We Keep Living in Hotboxes Like […]

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Snow Shortages Are Plaguing the West’s Mountains

With gusts of wind howling around Mount Ashland’s vacant ski lodge this week, Andrew Gast watched from a window as a brief snowfall dusted the landscape. It was not nearly enough. The ski area’s parking lot remained largely empty. On the slopes, manzanita bushes and blades of grass were poking through patches of what little […]

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Cali Approved Sewage Waste To Be Converted To Drinking Water, But Should Black Folk be Wary?

Regulators in California have approved the use of advanced filtration and treatment facilities that would convert sewage waste into pure drinking water. In addition, that water would be feed into systems for millions of households via tap. ‘Married to Medicine’s’ Toya Bush-Harris Talks Phaedra, Quad, & More In A Game of “What’s Worse” Off English […]

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Southern peninsula communities awarded federal grants to improve water systems

Three southern peninsula communities will receive funds to improve their water systems as part of a federal investment announced earlier this month. U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development State Director for Alaska Julia Hnilicka announced in a Dec. 11 press release that 21 projects to improve rural Alaskan water and wastewater infrastructure have been federally […]

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MIT campus goals in food, water, waste support decarbonization efforts

With the launch of Fast Forward: MIT’s Climate Action Plan for the Decade, the Institute committed to decarbonize campus operations by 2050 — an effort that touches on every corner of MIT, from building energy use to procurement and waste. At the operational level, the plan called for establishing a set of quantitative climate impact […]

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Sand Mining Threatens Long Island’s Drinking Water. Or Does It?

The Sand Land mine near Southhampton, N.Y., resembles the cratered surface of the moon, a treeless, torn-up work site that underscores the demand for a vital, if often overlooked, natural resource. Sand is crucial for building — it’s used to make concrete, asphalt and glass. And for over a century, sand from Long Island has […]

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Accelerated climate action needed to sharply reduce current risks to life and life-support systems

Hottest day on record. Hottest month on record. Extreme marine heatwaves. Record-low Antarctic sea-ice. While El Niño is a short-term factor in this year’s record-breaking heat, human-caused climate change is the long-term driver. And as global warming edges closer to 1.5 degrees Celsius — the aspirational upper limit set in the Paris Agreement in 2015 […]

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Biden Administration to Require Replacing of Lead Pipes Within 10 Years

The Biden administration is proposing new restrictions that would require the removal of virtually all lead water pipes across the country in an effort to prevent another public health catastrophe like the one that came to define Flint, Mich. The proposal on Thursday from the Environmental Protection Agency would impose the strictest limits on lead […]

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What Life in Gaza Is Like Right Now

In response to the devastating Oct. 7 attack on Israel by Hamas, the group that controls the Gaza Strip, Israel imposed what it called a complete siege — cutting off almost all water, food, electricity and fuel for the more than two million Palestinians living in Gaza. It also launched thousands of airstrikes on the […]

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Storms, Rising Seas and Salty Drinking Water Threaten Lower Louisiana

First, the flowers and vegetables in Cherie Pete’s backyard in Venice, La., began to die. Then she had to take sweet tea off the menu at her roadside snack shop as saltwater coursed out of her faucets. “There’s no way I’m serving that to my customers,” said Ms. Pete, 59. “I’m not making people sick.” […]

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Pond in Hawaii Turned Pink, Raising a Red Flag for the Environment

A pond in Hawaii became a social media spectacle this week after turning bubble-gum pink. However, experts said the new hue was not just a photo opportunity but an indicator of environmental stress. Staff members at the Kealia Pond National Wildlife Refuge on Maui have been monitoring the pink water for the last two weeks, […]

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16 Times Black America Bore The Brunt of Environmental Racism

NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA: AUGUST 30: A mother and her child are rescued by boat from the Lower Ninth Ward during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina August 30, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Katrina made landfall as a Category 4 storm with sustained winds in excess of 135 mph. Photo: Mario Tama (Getty Images) Nearly a […]

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All The Times Black America Bore The Brunt of Environmental Racism

NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA: AUGUST 30: A mother and her child are rescued by boat from the Lower Ninth Ward during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina August 30, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Katrina made landfall as a Category 4 storm with sustained winds in excess of 135 mph. Photo: Mario Tama (Getty Images) Nearly a […]

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