Tag: Sustainable Living

It’s the End of California as We Know It

I have lived nearly all my life in California, and my love for this place and its people runs deep and true. There have been many times in the past few years when I’ve called myself a California nationalist: Sure, America seemed to be going crazy, but at least I lived in the Golden State, […]

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France’s Far Right Wants to Be an Environmental Party, Too

HÉNIN-BEAUMONT, France — All of the lighting in the city’s streets and buildings is being changed to environmentally friendly LED bulbs. City workers will come to your house to plant trees — for free — as a natural way to keep cool against the kind of heat waves that swept across Europe over the summer. […]

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What Are We Supposed to Think About Shrimp?

We Americans may enjoy our tuna and savor our salmon, but nothing makes us weak in the knees like an overloaded buffet of all-you-can-eat shrimp. Whether it’s battered and fried, steamed and cocktail-sauced, or boiled until tender in spicy brine, shrimp is a national obsession. Our consumption has been escalating, up to about 4.4 pounds […]

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In the Sea, Not All Plastic Lasts Forever

A major component of ocean pollution is less devastating and more manageable than usually portrayed, according to a scientific team at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution on Cape Cod, Mass., and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Previous studies, including one last year by the United Nations Environment Program, have estimated that polystyrene, a ubiquitous plastic […]

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Fashion’s Latest Trend: Eco Bragging Rights

Of all the trends that emerged from fashion month, the four-week-long circuit of ready-to-wear shows in New York, London, Milan and Paris that ended last week, the one that trumped all others was neither a skirt length nor a color nor a borrowed reference. It dominated runways in every single city; it became so ubiquitous […]

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A Roof of One’s Own, With or Without the Gingerbread

DETROIT — Colorful little homes are springing up alongside an arid freeway bank in the Dexter-Linwood neighborhood here, a few miles northwest of downtown. Although tourists sometimes think the buildings are playthings and knock on the doors, the site is actually intended to help solve desperate urban problems. “Every single house is different on purpose,” […]

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Bit by Bit, Socially Conscious Investors Are Influencing 401(k)’s

Peter Rothstein has a job with a social purpose: expanding the clean energy industry in the northeastern United States as a way to mitigate climate change. Soon, he will be able to support that mission when he saves for retirement. In November, the Boston-based Northeast Clean Energy Council, where Mr. Rothstein is president, will revise […]

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A 19th-Century Home in Brooklyn Gets a 21st-Century Makeover

When Bobby Johnston and Ruth Mandl found the townhouse they wanted to buy in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, it had just one glaringly obvious problem: It was too nice. “We were originally looking for something that was pretty dilapidated,” Ms. Mandl said. “And this one looked a lot more pristine than we thought we wanted.” Mr. Johnston, […]

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When the Choreographer Won’t Fly, the Dancers Rehearse by Skype

PARIS — “Can you see me? Can you hear me?” It was 6 p.m. in Paris and midday in New York, and Jérôme Bel was peering intently at the computer screen on his kitchen table. The dancer Catherine Gallant suddenly appeared in the Skype window. “We’re on Governors Island. Shall I show you the view?” […]

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You Might Not Want to Eat Bugs. But Would You Eat Meat That Ate Bugs?

At an insect farm in Cape Town, the bugs are hungry. More than 8 billion flies being raised in South Africa by the start-up company AgriProtein gobble 250 metric tons of food and farm waste, like corn stalks, potato peelings and damaged vegetables, every day. “There’s actually no such thing as waste. It’s just stuff […]

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The Enduring Appeal of Micro Living

Brent Heavener was 10 years old in 2008, when the real estate market crashed and a national passion for cheap, tiny houses went into overdrive. He was 16 when his father shared with him a picture of a renovated shipping container, which taught him that homes could be fashioned from unexpected objects. This inspired @tinyhouse, […]

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The Peaches Are Sweet, but Growing Them Isn’t

DEL REY, Calif. — When I first visited this tiny farm town to pick peaches, I did not expect to return. Certainly not every summer. Yet in July, here I was again, in triple-degree heat, for the ninth straight year of a pilgrimage with friends to an orchard just south of Fresno, near the geographic […]

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A New Way to Fight Crop Diseases, With a Smartphone

Late blight is a common disease of plants such as tomatoes and potatoes, capable of wiping out entire crops on commercial-scale fields. Caused by a fungus-like pathogen, it first appears as black or brown lesions on leaves, stems, fruit or tubers. If conditions are favorable, it can quickly spread to other plants through wet soil […]

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Counting Down to a Green New York

New York’s ambitious plan to fight climate change by virtually eliminating greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 is underway — and the battle begins at home. Two-thirds of the city’s planet-warming pollution is produced by buildings, primarily residential ones, according to a 2017 inventory. In spite of recent efforts, impeded in part by years of intense […]

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Fatal Accident With Metal Straw Highlights a Risk

A British woman was impaled by a metal straw after falling at her home, a coroner said in an inquest this week that highlighted the potential dangers of metal straws. Such straws have surged in popularity as cities, states and even countries have banned single-use plastic straws. The woman, Elena Struthers-Gardner, 60, who had a […]

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More New Yorkers Embrace Solar Power

In an effort to reduce their carbon footprints, homeowners across New York City are increasingly turning to solar energy, with Brooklyn brownstone owners hurrying to catch up with their counterparts in Queens and Staten Island. Because solar panels are generally designed for sloped roofs, Brooklyn’s many flat-topped rowhouses have put the borough at a disadvantage, […]

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What if We Paid Farmers to Fight Global Warming?

How we address an expanding list of crises related to global warming is the most demanding question of our day. So far, our approaches have been piecemeal, enormously costly and largely unsuccessful. A common denominator for many of these crises is in how we use the land, and that is where we will find the […]

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In a ‘Recycled’ House, Details That Will Grow on You

Few homeowners would want the shapes of fungus, germs or mold to freckle their walls or ceilings. But when Stephen Pallrand, the owner of the architecture, design and construction firm Home Front Build and a dedicated environmentalist, set out to construct his family’s new house in Los Angeles, he chose these intricate motifs. Printed mycelium, […]

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