Tag: Social values

There is No Economics Without Politics

Yves here. It wasn’t all that long ago that economics was called “political economy.” One of the key choices in economics is what to prioritize: efficiency or fairness. And on top of that, as Nassim Nicholas Taleb and others have regularly pointed out, achieving a high degree of efficiency typically comes at the expense of […]

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‘Hurricane Truthers’: Bonkers Conspiracies Are Putting Lives in Danger

Yves here. It’s disconcerting to see how effective the anti-vax crowd has been, particularly among educated people who ought to know better. Admittedly, some vaccines are low efficacy (like flu shots for the elderly) and some really do have real records of bad side effects (the HPV vaccine, which has been banned in Japan). Patients […]

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A Window into European Versus US Management

In our inbox, from a long established reader. Although the plural of anecdote is not data, we’ve heard stories from Americans working (not happily) for financiers cut from similar cloth to the US management described below. But the openness of the looting is still striking. Private-equity-style asset stripping looks to be the new vogue against […]

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The China Cables: Leaked Classified Chinese Documents Confirm China Running Massive Concentration Camps to “Re-educate” Uighurs;

Oddly, a blockbuster leak based on classified Chinese government documents confirm charges that large-scale prison camps in the Xinjiang region use extreme regimentation and torture to turn its Muslim population, the Uighur, into the functional equivalent of Han Chinese, is not getting prominent play in most Western newspapers even though the number incarcerated may exceed […]

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How Neoliberal Thinkers Spawned Monsters They Never Imagined

By Lynn Parramore, Senior Research Analyst at the Institute for New Economic Thinking. Originally published at the Institute for New Economic Thinking website Political theorist Wendy Brown’s latest book, In the Ruins of Neoliberalism: The Rise of Antidemocratic Politics in the West, traces the intellectual roots of neoliberalism and reveals how an anti-democratic project unleashed […]

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Under Swollen Tides, Venice Says More About Our Future Than Our Past

Yves here. Venice illustrates a problem that climate change will force individuals and societies to confront: What will we try to save, and what will we decide, deliberately or via neglect, to sacrifice? And this isn’t just our cultural legacy, but cities, populations, even species. From a related post on Venice at Grist: Saltwater rushed […]

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Why Aren’t Americans Rising Up Like the People of Chile and Lebanon?

Yves here. While this article raises an important question, as in why don’t Americans revolt, its analysis leaves a lot to be desired. For instance, its authors Medea Benjamin and Nicolas J S Davies make the bizarre claim that Occupy failed because it “failed to transition from a rallying point and a decentralized, democratic forum […]

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The Joker to Guy Fawkes: Why Protesters Around the World are Wearing the Same Masks

Jerri-Lynn here. Note that today the South China Morning Post reported Hong Kong’s mask ban has been ruled unconstitutional; see  Anti-mask law to quell Hong Kong protests ruled unconstitutional by High Court: A Hong Kong court has declared the government’s anti-mask law unconstitutional.High Court judges on Monday found the mask ban introduced under emergency legislation […]

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Left Twitter Responds With Viral #TooFarLeft Hashtag After Obama Counsels Democrats to Tamp Down Progressive Ambitions

Jerri-Lynn here. This post includes a nice selection of tweets  responding to the effort to direct the Democratic Party back towards policy positions favored by wealthy donors. I include another notable tweet, missing from the litany below: One thing I appreciate about Obama is how he insists on proving Matt Stoller right. https://t.co/SvMEYRLX7s — Matt […]

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30 Years After the Berlin Wall Came Down, East and West Germany Are Still Divided

Yves here. This picture of Germany is disheartening but familiar. Look at the gap between the Deep South and the rest of the US, and more recently, “flyover” and coastal cities. By Nathan Stoltzfus, Dorothy and Jonathan Rintels Professor of Holocaust Studies, Florida State University. Originally published at The Conversation Thirty years ago, on November […]

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The Managers’ Coup d’Etat in Health Care Appears Complete – a Study of Top Health Care “Influencers”

Yves here. One of the things I can’t prove but know to be true is the great expansion in the number of MBA programs seen as having significant credentialing value has been to the great detriment of the US. When I was a kid, MBAs for the most part sought jobs in Wall Street, consulting, […]

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The Myth of Shareholder Primacy

By Sahil Jai Dutta, a lecturer in political economy at the University of Goldsmiths, London and Samuel Knafo, a Senior Lecturer in the Department of International Relations at the University of Sussex. Originally published at the PERC blog In the late 1960s, a young banker named Joel Stern was working on a project to transform […]

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Manufacturing Fear and Loathing, Maximizing Corporate Profits! A Review of Matt Taibbi’s Hate Inc.: Why Today’s Media Makes Us Despise One Another

By John Siman Matt Taibbi’s Hate Inc. is the most insightful and revelatory book about American politics to appear since the publication of Thomas Frank’s Listen, Liberal almost four full years ago, near the beginning of the last presidential  election cycle. While Frank’s topic was the abysmal failure of the Democratic Party to be democratic and Taibbi’s […]

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Neoliberalism Tells Us We’re Selfish Souls – How Can We Promote Other Identities?

Lambert here: Not sure the soul is an identity, but authors don’t write the headlines. Read on! By Christine Berry, a freelance researcher and writer and was previously Director of Policy and Government for the New Economics Foundation. She has also worked at ShareAction and in the House of Commons. Originally published at Open Democracy. […]

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NCAA Votes to Allow College Athletes to Benefit from the Use of Their Names, Images, and Likenesses

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. The board of governors of the National Collegiate Athletic Administration (NCAA) voted unanimously to being reforming its rules to allow college athletes to benefit from the use of their names, images, and […]

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The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic: Part 4 of 4: The Empire as Hegemonic “Banana Republic” Ruled by Caudillos

Yves here. Wrapping up a high-level history of the Roman Republic. By Newdealdemocrat. Originally published at Angry Bear As we have seen, the Roman Republic was brought down by an escalating series of acts of political violence, from murders to organized political mobs, to private legions, to four military marches over a period of 40 […]

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Global Protests Round-Up: Authoritarian Adaption, Data Gathering, and the Role of Class

By Lambert Strether of Corrente. The title of this post (and the post on specific protests to follow) is a bit of a misnomer: I will not be able to write “globally,” at least not immediately, because as we shall see in a moment, there are simply too many protests for our small crew. Second, […]

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Our Response to the Next Crisis Must Tackle Consumerism

Yves here. While one can applaud the sentiments in this post, status competition is a strong feature of most societies. Admittedly, some have revered accomplishment or sacrifice or exemplary behavior over having a lot of toys. But so much of our behavior revolves around consumerism that it affects how we tackle problems. For instance, one […]

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Chile in Flames: The Neoliberal Model in Crisis Throughout the Region

Yves here. With 2019 shaping up to be another 1848, it’s hard to provide in-depth commentary on so many protests. Nevertheless, Lambert hopes to provide a high-level piece soon. In the meantime, this post on Chile will hopefully fill in some of the gaps as well as encourage readers who have insight to provide additional […]

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