Tag: Social policy

The Bad News About Nudges: They Might Be Backfiring

Yves here. A problem with “nudges,” as in manipulation that makes clever use of cognitive biases (like putting fruit ahead of cake in a school cafeteria line…which ought to work all of once in getting kids to chose healthier desserts but reportedly has a higher success rate than that) is that, in the climate change […]

Read More

”Who Says Violence Doesn’t Solve Anything?” A Review of Radicalized: Four Tales of Our Present Moment by Cory Doctorow

By John Siman     On the back cover of this collection of four tales— intricately-imagined novellas, really, of about sixty to a hundred pages each — one reads a second subtitle: Radicalized: Dystopia is now. For Doctorow is not warning us about extra bad things that could very likely happen in the near future […]

Read More

Dying on the Job: How Workers Get Hurt When Businesses Keep Deadly Secrets

Lambert here: Gerard’s approach sounds a lot like “safety culture” in the airline industry (though the cases may not be comparable, because all except those who can afford to use private jets use commercial aircraft, not the case for the workplace). By Leo W. Gerard, international president of the United Steelworkers Union (USW). This article […]

Read More

Using Maps as a Weapon to Resist Extractive Industries on Indigenous Territories

Sébastien Caquard ,Associate Professor in Geography, Concordia University, Annita Lucchesi, PhD student, University of Lethbridge, Daviken Studnicki-Gizbert, Associate professor, Department of History, McGill University, Leah Temper, Research Associate, History and Classical Studies, McGill University and Thomas Mcgurk, Lecturer, Department of Geography, Planning and Environment, Concordia University. Originally published at The Conversation. For Indigenous peoples across […]

Read More

How Your Employer Uses Perks Like Wellness Programs, Phones and Free Food to Control Your Life

By Elizabeth C. Tippet, Associate Professor, School of Law, University of Oregon. Originally published at The Conversation. Companies offer all sorts of benefits and extras to attract the most favored workers, from health care and stock options to free food. But all those perks come at a price: your freedom. There’s a reason labor historians […]

Read More

Empire and Economics: The Long History of Debt Cancellation from Antiquity to Today

This panel discussion with Michael Hudson, Reverend Dr. Liz Theoharis, and New Testament expert Dr. Aliou Niang at the People’s Forum earlier this month. It’s a meaty Passover/Easer offering on the history of debt cancellation and as important, how that’s been central to important ancient records like the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Rosetta Stone, […]

Read More

Making American Schools Less Great Again

Yves here. This is a personal vignette about setting up government for failure. A teacher describes how budget cuts to schools in her district produced predictable results: overcrowded classrooms, diminished attention to students, particularly ones who would have benefitted from support. And perhaps as important, exhaustion and demoralization among teachers trying to cope. Belle Chesler, […]

Read More

The Anti-Sanders Press Influenced the 2016 Primary. Will It Do the Same Again?

By Thomas Neuburger. Originally published at DownWithTyranny! How will these people respond if they think Sanders was cheated again? Like many I watched the 2016 Democratic primary carefully, and like many I was appalled by what looked like rampant cheating of varying types and degrees by national party leaders, state officials and local functionaries. So […]

Read More

‘The Greed of UnitedHealth Is Killing Americans’: Progressives Hit Back as Insurance CEO Bashes Medicare for All

Yves here. I very much like the use of the word “disrupt” as what needs to happen to health care in the US. Heretofore, Silicon Valley squillionaries “disrupt” has been treated as the business press as meaning “shake up an industry for the benefit of consumers” when it has often meant “show revenue growth by […]

Read More

Energy Equity: Bringing Solar Power to Low-Income Communities

By Maria Gallucci, the 2017-2018 Energy Journalism Fellow at the University of Texas at Austin. Originally published at Yale e360 as part of its Climate Desk collaboration with Grist Isbel “Izzy” Palans lives in a small cabin nestled among mountain peaks and towering trees in the Colorado Rockies. Her home is often shaded and, during […]

Read More

Where Are All the Bugs Going and What Can I Do About It?

Lambert: A couple of points. First, “gardening” is not a consumerist response to “climate change.” Beyond the good effects on one’s own body and spirit (assuming you’re not spraying chemicals all over everything), plants that attract beneficial insects benefit not only you, but the entire ecosystem that surrounds you, and all without any sort of […]

Read More

Sacramento Teacher Strike Is a Warning to #RedForEd Movement Everywhere

By Jeff Bryant, a writing fellow and chief correspondent for Our Schools, a project of the Independent Media Institute. He is a communications consultant, freelance writer, advocacy journalist, and director of the Education Opportunity Network, a strategy and messaging center for progressive education policy. His award-winning commentary and reporting routinely appear in prominent online news […]

Read More

The Return of la Marine

By Hans-Georg Betz, a leading expert on populism and the radical right in affluent liberal democracies, and has written several seminal books and articles on radical right-wing populism, nativism, and Islamophobia. His academic profile can be found here. Originally published at openDemocracy There is a saying in German – Totgesagte leben länger, roughly but not quite […]

Read More

Bill Black: Tom Friedman Just Noticed that the UK “Has Gone Mad”

Yves here. Bill Black does a systematic and well-deserved vivisection of The World According to Thomas Friedman, using his latest column as a point of departure. One of Black’s remarkable finds is that Friedman acknowledged that deregulation and globalization would make financial crises “endemic,” yet couldn’t be bothered to consider that they would impose massive […]

Read More

The Delphic Oracle Was Their Davos: A Four-Part Interview With Michael Hudson: A New “Reality Economics” Curriculum Is Needed (Part 4)

By John Siman, who is also the author of Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3  in this series John Siman:I want to spell out the implications of the points that Socrates brought up, and with which you and I agree. That leaves the question facing us today: Is the American oligarchy and state as […]

Read More

The Delphic Oracle Was Their Davos: A Four-Part Interview With Michael Hudson: The Inherent Financial Instability in Western Civilization’s DNA (Part 3)

By John Siman, who is also the author of Part 1 and Part 2 in this series John Siman: It seems that unless there’s a Hammurabi-style “divine king” or some elected civic regulatory authority, oligarchies will arise and exploit their societies as much as they can, while trying to prevent the victimized economy from defending […]

Read More

Yasha Levine: Respectable Racists

Yves here. Yasha Levine describes the hypocrisy of liberals who almost certainly consider themselves woke, or at least not racists, engaging in precisely that sort of behavior with respect to Russians. We’ve seen another case study in double standards, with Democrats defending Joe Biden’s habit of putting his hands on women in subordinate positions when […]

Read More

The Delphic Oracle Was Their Davos: A Four-Part Interview With Michael Hudson: Mixed Economies Today, Compared To Those Of Antiquity (Part 2)

By John Siman John Siman: Could you define what you mean by a mixed economy? Michael Hudson: There are many degrees of how “mixed” an economy will be — meaning in practice, how active its government sector will be in regulating markets, prices and credit, and investing in public infrastructure.  In the 20thcentury’s Progressive Era […]

Read More

The Delphic Oracle Was Their Davos: A Four-Part Interview With Michael Hudson About His Forthcoming Book The Collapse of Antiquity (Part 1)

Yves here. Classicist John Siman and Michael Hudson got to know each other at NC meetup last year, which led to the series of conversations that is codified in this series. Here, Hudson describes in antiquity, how oligarchs in Greece and Rome ended the practice of debt jubilees and became rentiers. By John Siman Note: […]

Read More