Tag: Social policy

How Teacher Strikes Are Exposing the Corrupt Charter School Agenda

By Jeff Bryant, a writing fellow and chief correspondent for Our Schools, a project of the Independent Media Institute. He is a communications consultant, freelance writer, advocacy journalist, and director of the Education Opportunity Network, a strategy and messaging center for progressive education policy. His award-winning commentary and reporting routinely appear in prominent online news […]

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GoFundMe CEO: ‘Gigantic Gaps’ In Health System Showing Up In Crowdfunding

By Rachel Bluth, Reporter for Kaiser Health News and Peggy Girshman Fellow. She was previously the lead political correspondent for the Annapolis Bureau of Capital News Service and has also written for the Maryland Reporter and the Prince George’s Sentinel. Originally published at Kaiser Health News Scrolling through the GoFundMe website reveals seemingly an endless […]

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$15 Minimum Wage: Job Killer or Path Out of Poverty?

This Real News Network segment sets forth the most common arguments against increasing the minimum wage to $15 an hour, or alternatively, a living wage level, and shows why they don’t hold up to scrutiny. A decent minimum wage is even more important when the supposedly robust US economy is increasingly creating McJobs. JAISAL NOOR: […]

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The Downside of Market-Minded Philanthropy

By David Campbell, Associate Professor of Public Administration, Binghamton University, State University of New York. Originally published at The Conversation Billionaires made some eye-popping donations in 2018. Amazon founder Jeff Bezos announced plans to spend US$2 billion to help the homeless and create a network of free preschools. Media mogul and former New York City […]

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Thoughts on Warren and Sanders: How Much Change Is Needed in 2021?

Yves here. I know Warren is deemed to be progressive by American standards, but I recall clearly when I first say her speak at a Roosevelt Institute conference, Let Markets Be Markets, which was a title I found to be unhelpful, since it suggested that markets would exist in a state of nature and just […]

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Starting the New Year Badly and Well

By Thomas Neuburger (aka Gaius) Originally published at DownWithTyranny! BREAKING: Gov. Jay Inslee to offer pardons for thousands with misdemeanor pot convictions https://t.co/EesejA88hz via @seattletimes — Jim Brunner (@Jim_Brunner) January 4, 2019 As we gear up for the full blast of the next new year, I want to offer a selection of items for your […]

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Journey into a Libertarian Future: Response to Reader Comments

This post was first published on December 12, 2011 By Andrew Dittmer, who recently finished his PhD in mathematics at Harvard and is currently continuing work on his thesis topic. He also taught mathematics at a local elementary school. Andrew enjoys explaining the recent history of the financial sector to a popular audience. Many readers wrote in warm […]

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Journey into a Libertarian Future: Part VI – Certainty

This post was first published on December 6, 2018 By Andrew Dittmer, who recently finished his PhD in mathematics at Harvard and is currently continuing work on his thesis topic. He also taught mathematics at a local elementary school. Andrew enjoys explaining the recent history of the financial sector to a popular audience. Simulposted at The Distributist Review […]

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Intergenerational Mobility in the US: One Size Doesn’t Fit All

By Juan C. Palomino, Research Officer, Institute for New Economic Thinking, University of Oxford; Gustavo A. Marrero, Professor of Economics and Director, Research Center of Social Inequality and Governance (CEDESOG), University of La Laguna; and Juan Gabriel Rodríguez, Professor of Economics, Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Originally published at VoxEU The American Dream is grounded in […]

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Journey into a Libertarian Future: Part V – Dark Realities

This post was first published on December 5, 2011 By Andrew Dittmer, who recently finished his PhD in mathematics at Harvard and is currently continuing work on his thesis topic. He also taught mathematics at a local elementary school. Andrew enjoys explaining the recent history of the financial sector to a popular audience. Simulposted at The Distributist Review […]

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UN Backs Seed Sovereignty as Defense Against Multinational-Led GMO Projects

Lambert here: Awesome. Very good news. By Timothy A. Wise, a senior researcher at the Small Planet Institute, collaborating with director Frances Moore Lappé to start its new Land and Food Rights Program. He is also a senior research fellow at Tufts University’s Global Development and Environment Institute. Originally published at Triple Crisis. On December […]

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Journey into a Libertarian Future: Part IV – The Journey into a Libertarian Past

This post was first published on December 2, 2011 By Andrew Dittmer, who recently finished his PhD in mathematics at Harvard and is currently continuing work on his thesis topic. He also taught mathematics at a local elementary school. Andrew enjoys explaining the recent history of the financial sector to a popular audience. Simulposted at The Distributist Review […]

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Journey into a Libertarian Future: Part III – Regulation

Lambert here: Andrew’s dead-pan voice and genre-bending technique seem to perplexed some readers. “Journey into a Libertarian Future” is not a genuine interview, although it is cast in the form of an interview. The interviewee, “Code Name Cain,” is fictional, but also a proxy for the libertarian thought leader, Hans Hoppe, whose words Andrew “puts […]

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Basic Income vs Guaranteed Jobs: What If We Paid Stay-At-Home Moms?

By Stephanie Ervin, who heads up Civic Ventures’ special projects and is co-creator of the podcast Pitchfork Economics. Ervin specializes in community organizing, outreach, and public policy matters. Cross-posted from Evonomics. Rising income inequality coupled with the fear that robots will soon occupy more jobs than average Americans has everyone calling for the creation of […]

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Neoliberalism as Structure and Ideology

Yves here. While Dorman offers an interesting theory as to how neoliberalism gained traction, I don’t see it as explaining as much as Dorman thinks it does. His discussion does not acknowledge that a well-funded effort to turn the country right was underway well before the severe recession of the early-mid 1970s. The key players […]

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“Summer” Rerun: Journey into a Libertarian Future: Part II – The Strategy

This post first appeared on November 30, 2011 By Andrew Dittmer, who recently finished his PhD in mathematics at Harvard and is currently continuing work on his thesis topic. He also taught mathematics at a local elementary school. Andrew enjoys explaining the recent history of the financial sector to a popular audience. Simulposted at The Distributist Review This […]

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“Summer” Rerun: Journey into a Libertarian Future: Part I –The Vision

Yves here. In some summers past, we’ve rerun NC classics during slow news periods. We haven’t had slow news period in a while, and one side effect is that we haven’t yet reprised this series on libertarianism, which will run this week and into next week. Enjoy! This post first appeared on November 29, 2011 […]

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Christmas Hucksterism: The Last Mile of the Supply Chain is Safer Than You Think

By Lambert Strether of Corrente. Last week, I ran a video on “package thieves,” in which YouTube personality, “ex-NASA brain,” and putatively high net-worth individual Mark Rober created a “glitter bomb revenge package,” which harmlessly exploded when a thief apparently stole a package from his porch. Here’s the video, which naturally went viral (“If you […]

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