Tag: Social policy

One Nation Under Stress?

Yves here. It’s frustrating to see an article start to get to the essence of a major issue and then pull up short. Here, author Dana Becker discusses how discussions of and suggested remedies for stress typically look only at immediate conditions and not underlying, societal drivers. Presumably, Becker gives a more comprehensive treatment in […]

Read More

Advertisers Blacklisting News, Other Stories with “Controversial” Words Like “Trump”

It’s no longer paranoid to say that “they” are out to kill news. First it was the Internet almost entirely displacing classified ads, which had accounted for roughly half of newspaper industry revenues in the US. The Internet also turned most people save those who are now oldsters off print newspapers, even though nothing is […]

Read More

Life, Deferred: Student Debt Postpones Key Milestones for Millions of Americans

By Natalia Abrams, the Executive Director of Student Debt Crisis, and Cody Hounanian, the Program Director of Student Debt Crisis. Originally published at openDemocracy Student debt has been solely responsible for the majority of my decision-making as an adult(Erin – Portland, Maine) The student debt crisis is not the burden of a single generation. It […]

Read More

Austerity Has Made People Less Prepared for a No Deal Brexit

Yves here. Most commentary on the economic impact of Brexit has focused on the effects on trade, commerce, investment, the financial sector….with comparatively little on how it will affect ordinary people. By Duncan Exley, author of The End of Aspiration? Social mobility and our children’s fading prospects(Policy Press 2019) available here at a 20 per […]

Read More

How Capitalism Exploits Our Fear of Old Age

Yves here. I don’t mean to be a nay-sayer, but having developed major orthopedic problems after an accident, I find it hard to be cheery about getting old. This article makes a passing mention of financial stress among the elderly. A new story in the Financial Times, adding to a 2018 study Greying of US […]

Read More

How Private Prisons Affect Sentencing

By Christian Dippel, Assistant Professor of Economics, UCLA Anderson School of Management and Michael Poyker, Postdoctoral Researcher, Columbia University Graduate School of Business. Originally published at VoxEU The first private prison in the US opened in 1984. Over the next three decades, the imprisoned population increased by 194% while the country’s overall population increased by […]

Read More

Mark Blyth’s Incisive Post-Crisis Takedown: “A Brief History of How We Got Here and Why”

Mark Blyth, the Brown political scientist of “The Hamptons are not a defensible position” fame, has a must-watch video of a presentation, A Brief History of How We Got Here and Why, which we’ve embedded below. We’re featuring it despite the lack of a transcript. Even though Blyth presents a fair bit of detail that […]

Read More

Trump Pretends to Like Union Members—But He Really Likes the Fat Cats

By Tom Conway, the international president of the United Steelworkers Union (USW). Produced by the Independent Media Instutute Donald Trump: billionaire of the people. When he ran for office, he said, “The American worker will finally have a president who will protect them and fight for them.” And how’s that working out for the American […]

Read More

Restoring the Commons

Yves here. Even though this article implicitly accepts the idea of growth, which too often turns out to be groaf, relying more on commons-type structure is likely to become more and more important in an era of resource scarcity and relocalization. By Douglas Rushkoff, host of the Team Human podcast and author of Team Human […]

Read More

Reclaiming the Commons Through State Ownership? Maybe Not

By Milan Babic, a PhD candidate at the Corpnet research group at the University of Amsterdam. He works on the implications of the rise of transnational state capital and global corporate power. You can find him on Twitter (@mbabic_1) or on milanbabic.com. Originally published at openDemocracy as part of its Decolonising the economy’series In a […]

Read More

Hit by Epic Construction Downturn, Mexico Faces Reality: New President Tries to Get Folks to Play by the Rules, and Everything Stalls

Yves here. Mexican president Obrador, known as AMLO, may be presiding over a borderline recession. Even though the economy has softened, he still is very popular. And I wonder if some of his fans would attribute the slowdown to a capital strike by those who feel most threatened by his reforms. Having said that, AMLO […]

Read More

Robert O. Paxton’s “The Five Stages of Fascism”

By Lambert Strether of Corrente The word “fascism” has been much in the news of late. Here is a chart of the year 2019 from Google Trends: Interestingly, usage is more or less flat until the first spike, when President Trump put tanks on the National Mall for July 4, and then a second, larger […]

Read More

Incentivizing an Ethical Economics

Yves here. Believe it or not, incentivizing the well-off works. By Simon Szreter, professor of history and public policy at Cambridge University, fellow of St John’s College and co-founder and editor of www.historyandpolicy.org., Hilary Cooper, an economic consultant, researcher. former government economist and senior policymaker, and Ben Szreter, hief executive of a community-based charity. Together […]

Read More

Agroecology as Innovation

By Timothy A. Wise, a Senior Researcher on the Land and Food Rights Program at Small Planet Institute and a researcher at the Global Development and Environment Institute at Tufts University. He is the author of Eating Tomorrow: Agribusiness, Family Farmers, and the Battle for the Future of Food (New Press, 2019). Originally published at Triple Crisis Recently, the High Level […]

Read More

The Big Blue Gap in the Green New Deal

By Dr. Ayana Elizabeth Johnson, a marine biologist, founder and CEO of the consulting firm Ocean Collectiv, and founder of Urban Ocean Lab, a think tank for coastal cities, Dr. Chad Nelsen, CEO of Surfrider Foundation, the largest grassroots organization dedicated to coastal and ocean protection, and Bren Smith, founder of GreenWave and author of […]

Read More

Why Social Mobility Is a Lousy Idea

By Hadas Weiss, an anthropologist and the author of We Have Never Been Middle Class: How Social Mobility Misleads Us (Verso, 2019). Originally published at openDemocracy If you want a more just society, don’t accept that you’re a competitor in a rat race. Jeremy Corbyn’s announcement last month that a Labour government would replace social […]

Read More

A Way Out from Rock Bottom: Economic Policies Can Reduce Deaths of Despair

By William H. Dow, Professor of Health Economics, University of California, Berkeley; Anna Godøy, Research Economist, University of California, Berkeley; Chris Lowenstein, PhD student in Health Economics, University of California, Berkeley; and Michael Reich,Professor of Economics, University of California, Berkeley. Originally published at VoxEU Policymakers and researchers have sought to understand the causes of and […]

Read More

Mobility and the Desire for Sovereignity in Europe

By Gianmarco Ottaviano, Professor of Economics, Bocconi University. Originally published at VoxEU Economic geography strikes back. After a couple of decades of easy talk about the ‘death of distance’ in the age of globalisation, the promise of a world of rising living standards for all is increasingly challenged by the resilience of regional disparities within […]

Read More

Charter Schools Unleashed “Educational Hunger Games” in California. Now It’s Fighting Back.

By Andrea Gabor, Bloomberg Professor, Baruch College. Originally published at the Institute for New Economic Thinking website California has the highest concentration of charter schools in the U.S., with one in 10 students in the state educated in one of them. Since the legislature passed a charter law in 1992, these schools have enjoyed the […]

Read More

Takers and Makers: Who Are the Real Value Creators?

By Mariana Mazzucato, Professor of the Economics of Innovation at the Science Policy Research Unit of the University of Sussex. Author of The Entrepreneurial State: Debunking Public vs. Private Sector Myths. Twitter: @MazzucatoM. Adapted from The Value of Everything by Mariana Mazzucato. Copyright © 2018 by Penguin Random House UK. ; originally published at Evonomics […]

Read More