Tag: September 11 (2001)

2004: ‘Fahrenheit 9/11’ and a Country at War With Itself

The last time the country was at war with itself, Michael Moore made a movie people were mad at, too. It opened at the end of June, 16 years ago. The parent-company that released it didn’t even want to. But after weeks of controversy, the Palme d’Or at Cannes and a very good trailer, Moore’s […]

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Biden Still Wants to Close Guantánamo Prison

This article was produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. President Barack Obama vowed to close it, and failed. President Trump vowed to load it up with more “bad dudes,” and has not. Now Joseph R. Biden Jr. is saying that if elected president, he would support shutting down the military prison […]

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Pakistan’s Prime Minister Suggests Osama Bin Laden Was a Martyr

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — Prime Minister Imran Khan of Pakistan was criticized by opposition lawmakers after making a speech to Parliament in which he said Osama bin Laden had been “martyred” by the United States when it killed the mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks in 2011. Mr. Khan was rebuked for his remarks, which included […]

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The Agonizing Question: Is New York City Worth It Anymore?

The pandemic was already wearing on Lyn Miller-Lachmann, a children’s book author and translator who lives in the East Village. “My husband and I love New York City,” she said. “We sacrificed a lot to live here.” But it wasn’t until the curfews and talk of the National Guard entering the city started that she […]

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After the Coronavirus, Don’t Forget the Paramedics

On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, I was working as a paramedic in Lower Manhattan. I responded to the attacks on the World Trade Center. In dust so thick it shrouded the sun, my fellow rescue workers and I picked our way through the rubble, looking for survivors. Very few of us had masks. […]

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How Quarantine Saved the Hot Dog

In 1867 Charles Feltman, a German immigrant, opened the first hot-dog stand in Coney Island. He called his signature frankfurter the Coney Island red hot, and it was served with mustard, sauerkraut and diced raw onions. Soon, Feltman’s red hots were all the rage. President William Howard Taft tried one. Al Capone is said to […]

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Can the Democrats Avoid Trump’s China Trap?

Before the pandemic, before the Great Recession, before proliferating hurricanes and fires, the United States began a global war on terrorism. Its leaders fixated on a shadowy enemy abroad as life at home crumbled for millions of Americans. The war on terrorism did not end terrorism; the war itself became endless. What it did shatter […]

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George W. Bush Calls for End to Pandemic Partisanship

WASHINGTON — Former President George W. Bush called on Americans on Saturday to put aside partisan differences, heed the guidance of medical professionals and show empathy for those stricken by the coronavirus and the resulting economic devastation. In a three-minute video message, Mr. Bush, who rarely speaks out on current events, struck a tone of […]

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9/11 Prisoners May Get Video Chats to Bridge the Coronavirus Divide

This article was produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. WASHINGTON — In a bid to restore some access to Guantánamo’s isolated detainees, prosecutors in the trial over the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks are proposing weekly video meetings between the five defendants and their lawyers, which would require both sides to work […]

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Does New York Survive the Coronavirus?

Listen and subscribe to our podcast from your mobile device: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Play | RadioPublic | Stitcher How will the coronavirus change New York City — and what does the city’s response to the pandemic say about the rest of the country? On a special episode of “The Argument,” Frank Bruni […]

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Amid the Coronavirus Pandemic, Pondering a Promise to My Son

In June 2017, hours after I’d held my newborn boy for the first time, a rental van accelerated onto a London Bridge walkway and ran over as many pedestrians as it could. When the van crashed, its occupants got out and began attacking civilians with knives. The three ISIS terrorists were soon shot dead by […]

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To Manage the Coronavirus in New York, You Need Testing and Tracking

If the United States gets it right, coronavirus testing will eventually become available in community centers and parks, at mobile clinics and sports arenas. A Postal Service worker may even bring a test to your door. If that seems far-fetched, think again. Public health experts agree that finding our way back from the coronavirus pandemic […]

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The 9/11 Trial: Why Is It Taking So Long?

This article was produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. WASHINGTON — Next year is the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, hijackings that killed 2,976 people in New York, at the Pentagon and in a Pennsylvania field. For much of those two decades, the United States has been holding five […]

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Here’s How New York Can Recover After the Coronavirus

Just a few months after the Sept. 11 attack, I joined the office of Mayor Michael Bloomberg of New York as deputy mayor for economic development and rebuilding, responsible for the city’s economic recovery. The predictions were dire. The New York Times warned of a return to the tough times of the 1970s, when austerity, […]

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What Is Missing From Afghan Peace Talks

PANJSHIR VALLEY, Afghanistan — After four decades of conflict, Afghanistan seems poised to embrace superficial peace. The negotiations between the United States and the Taliban in Doha, Qatar, culminated in a peace agreement between the two sides. The agreement paved the way for a national peace dialogue between the Taliban and a conglomerate of Afghan […]

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Does a Dept. of Pandemics Sound Odd? Homeland Security Once Did, Too

WASHINGTON — Exactly one month after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, two senior senators proposed the creation of an entirely new government department that would pull together the diverse, often competitive federal agencies whose lack of communication and coordination left the nation exposed to deadly terrorism on American soil. It became the Department of Homeland […]

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Albert Petrocelli, Fire Chief Who Lost a Son on 9/11, Dies at 73

This obituary is part of a series about people who have died in the coronavirus pandemic. In recent years, Albert Petrocelli was known in Staten Island’s Huguenot section as that nice man with the rosary beads and the bountiful garden. He walked the local streets, rosary in hand, offering to say prayers for those who […]

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The Coronavirus Inflicts Its Own Kind of Terror

BRUSSELS — The coronavirus has created its own form of terror. It has upended daily life, paralyzed the economy and divided people one from another. It has engendered fear of the stranger, of the unknown and unseen. It has emptied streets, restaurants and cafes. It has instilled a nearly universal agoraphobia. It has stopped air […]

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The Growing Culture of Secrecy at Guantánamo Bay

This article was produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. GUANTÁNAMO BAY, Cuba — During a court session this year in the case of the men accused plotting Sept. 11, defense lawyers spotted something curious: Prosecutors were huddled around a wireless silver tablet computer. When confronted about it, the judge made a […]

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What Sept. 11 Taught Us About Confronting Catastrophe

From careful planning and much drilling, medical workers knew without being told that they should roll a fleet of gurneys and wheelchairs onto the sidewalk outside St. Vincent’s Hospital in Greenwich Village on the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, New York’s last mortal catastrophe. But there they remained, empty. Nothing spoke louder than those mute, […]

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Military Judge in 9/11 Trial at Guantánamo Is Retiring

This article was produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. WASHINGTON — The military judge presiding in the Sept. 11 death penalty trial at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, has scheduled his retirement for later this year, in the latest blow to efforts to start the long-running trial in 2021. The judge, Col. W. […]

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Al Qaeda Branch in Somalia Threatens Americans in East Africa — and Even the U.S.

Al Qaeda’s branch in Somalia, the terrorist group’s largest and most active global affiliate, has issued specific new threats against Americans in East Africa and even the United States, U.S. commandos, counterterrorism officials and intelligence analysts say. Several ominous signs indicate that the Qaeda affiliate, the Shabab, is seeking to expand its lethal mayhem well […]

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New York Courts Struggle to Dispense Justice in Coronavirus Era

State judges in New York are using video to preside remotely over arraignments of criminal defendants. The Brooklyn district attorney’s office has suspended prosecution of some low-level crimes. The mayor’s office has asked the courts to release some older defendants from the Rikers Island jail, where most of the city’s 5,400 inmates are housed closely […]

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Why the Coronavirus Is So Much Worse Than Sept. 11

After the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, we were exhorted to defiance. I remember it well. Don’t let the terrorists win, we were told. Don’t let them steal your joys or disrupt your routines — at least not too much. Be wary, yes, and be patient with extra-long security lines where they didn’t previously […]

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Senate, Bidding for Time, Tries to Temporarily Revive Spy Tools

WASHINGTON — The Senate voted on Monday to temporarily reinstate a handful of newly expired F.B.I. tools for investigating terrorism and espionage in an attempt to grant lawmakers time to sort out broader differences over surveillance laws and move to addressing the coronavirus pandemic. Senators unanimously agreed to extend until early June the F.B.I. powers, […]

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N.Y.C.’s Economy Could be Ravaged by Coronavirus Outbreak

The sudden and prolonged shutdown of New York City’s museums and its iconic Broadway theaters. Restaurants and bars also closed except for take out and delivery. Hotels struggling to stay open in the face of a wave of canceled reservations. Movie theaters shuttered. The evaporation of nearly all business and leisure travel to the city. […]

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Inside the Most Secret Place at Guantánamo Bay

This article was produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. GUANTÁNAMO BAY, Cuba — For years, starting from the time they were held and interrogated by the C.I.A. after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, the prisoners spent their days and nights in isolation, each man locked alone in a cell, at times […]

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J. Seward Johnson Jr., Sculptor of the Hyper-Real, Dies at 89

J. Seward Johnson Jr., a sculptor who may be responsible for more double takes than anyone in history thanks to his countless lifelike creations in public places — a businessman in downtown Manhattan, surfers at a Florida beach, a student eating a sandwich on a curb in Princeton, N.J. — died on Tuesday at his […]

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Judge Orders Medical Panel to Evaluate Tortured Guantánamo Prisoner

This article was produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. WASHINGTON — A federal judge has ordered the United States military to have a panel of American and foreign doctors examine a Saudi man who was tortured at Guantánamo Bay to determine whether he should be released from the prison there and […]

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From the Afghan Peace Deal, a Weak and Pliable Neighbor for Pakistan

WASHINGTON — It was three days after the Sept. 11 attacks when Pakistan’s president yielded to the American demands — but also delivered a warning. President Pervez Musharraf told the American ambassador in Islamabad that his country would assist the United States in its looming war against the Taliban, long the recipients of Pakistan’s patronage. […]

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As Trump Botches the Coronavirus Crisis, I Long for … Giuliani

On Monday morning, I watched the news conferences held by Rudolph Giuliani on Sept. 11, 2001, when he was still the mayor of New York. Eighteen-plus years later, they look like dispatches from a remote and impossible universe, a place where dolphins roamed the earth and the sun shone pink. But at the time, they […]

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