Tag: Rivers

‘Our River Was Like a God’: How Dams and China’s Might Imperil the Mekong

ON THE MEKONG RIVER — When the Chinese came to the village of Lat Thahae, perched on a muddy bend of a Mekong River tributary, they scrawled a Chinese character on the walls of homes, schools and Buddhist temples. No one in this isolated hamlet in northern Laos could read what it said. But the […]

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In Berlin, a Creative Paradise That’s Easiest to Reach by Boat

Thirty years ago, when the Berlin Wall came down, the city was left with huge swaths of empty buildings in the former East: old German Democratic Republic embassies and factory complexes, some still riddled with toxic waste. It was both a daunting and heady opportunity for Berlin to reinvent itself and start over. Artists and […]

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At a Cambodian Lake, a Climate Crisis Unfolds

When I first met Ly Heng in May 2016, the forest behind his house was still smoldering — the remnants of the worst drought to hit Southeast Asia in decades. Heng lived along a small river at the top of Cambodia’s Tonle Sap Lake, in a protected area known for its rich biodiversity. At 45, […]

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How Long Before These Salmon Are Gone? ‘Maybe 20 Years’

NORTH FORK, Idaho — The Middle Fork of the Salmon River, one of the wildest rivers in the contiguous United States, is prime fish habitat. Cold, clear waters from melting snow tumble out of the Salmon River Mountains and into the boulder-strewn river, which is federally protected. The last of the spawning spring-summer Chinook salmon […]

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Overloaded Fishing Boat Capsizes in Indiana, Leaving 4 Dead and 1 Missing

An overloaded fishing boat ferrying seven people back to their cars after a family picnic along the White River in Indiana capsized on Monday night, killing four people and leaving one missing, the authorities said Tuesday. The accident happened around 9:30 p.m., after 16 members of a family had picnicked in a public fishing area […]

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In D.C., Trading Politics for a Paddle

We launched into the Potomac River just beneath the Francis Scott Key Bridge, which links upscale Georgetown with the chrome-and-glass office park of Rosslyn, Va., and immediately faced the D.C. kayaker’s quandary: Paddle downstream first, taking advantage of the current, to enjoy the majestic bottom-up view of the Lincoln Memorial? Or push upstream against the […]

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The Incontinent Cows of Middle-earth

New Zealand is a country of just under five million people and just over 10 million cows. The cows produce large amounts of lucrative beef and dairy — our two biggest export goods by dollar value — and even larger amounts of greenhouse gasses and nitrate pollution, and are therefore much discussed at the national […]

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Black Women Are Leaders in the Climate Movement

Before the first Democratic debate, I watched one of my favorite shows, MSNBC’s AM Joy, excited to see not one, but three people of color tapped to talk about climate change and how candidates were discussing it along the campaign trail. My heart dropped when Tiffany Cross, a guest commentator on the show, stated that […]

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How Many Times Does a River Have to Burn Before It Matters?

It was like a game of telephone. In the first whispers, which appeared in local newspapers on June 23, 1969, Cleveland’s Cuyahoga River didn’t burn. A floating oil slick did, for only 25 minutes, damaging a couple of train trestles. In the next telling, which appeared in Time magazine a month later, the heavily polluted […]

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Before Fatal Boat Crash in Budapest, Safety Warnings Went Unheeded

BUDAPEST — The warnings came before a ship called the Mermaid set out on May 29 in driving rain for a nighttime tour of Budapest. Before the much larger Viking Sigyn struck the Mermaid, capsizing and sinking it in seconds. Before 28 people died in Hungary’s worst boating accident in at least six decades. Traffic […]

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Paralysis on America’s Rivers: There’s Too Much Water

VAN BUREN, Ark. — Marty Shell just wanted the lights back on. Nineteen barges bound for nowhere were tied up along the swollen riverbank. Dark warehouses full of flooded fertilizer reeked with a sulfuric stench that made it painful to inhale. The river system, which for decades provided Mr. Shell a livelihood, now spreads only […]

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Fish Cannons, Koi Herpes and Other Tools to Combat Invasive Carp

Why is someone loading a fish into a tube? That’s Whooshh. It’s a high-tech fish removal system, something like a cross between a potato gun and a pneumatic tube at a drive-in bank. And that fish is a common carp, one the oldest and most invasive fish on the planet. [Like the Science Times page […]

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In the Midwest, Relentless Floods Dredge Up ‘Shadow’ of 1993

DAVENPORT, Iowa — In downtown Davenport, where the overflow from the Mississippi River is lapping at a new taproom in the heart of downtown, weary business owners cannot get another flood from years ago out of their minds. Three hundred miles downriver, in Valmeyer, Ill., some of those who stuck around in the lowlands after […]

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Army Corps Under Fire From Flood Victims Amid Storm Surge

SAND SPRINGS, Okla. — People whose homes had flooded filled the pews of a Baptist church that was still standing on dry ground. They bowed their heads as Oklahoma’s junior senator, James Lankford, led everyone in a prayer. But when a representative of the Army Corps of Engineers stood at the microphone to address residents […]

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