Tag: -recirc-suppress

The Judge and the Three-Strikes Convict

On the night before Christmas, 1996, wearing a black felt cowboy hat and cowboy boots, Joseph Scott Wharton strode up to the cash register of a Walgreens in Kent, Washington, placed a Santa Claus hat and some rolls of film on the counter, and demanded all of the money. “Don’t be foolish,” he said. “Don’t […]

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Climate Change Is the Symptom. Consumer Culture Is the Disease.

To save the planet, mankind must rapidly reduce its greenhouse gas emissions. But where should we be reducing those emissions from? What would make the biggest difference? EPA Journalists and environmentalists often answer that question by looking at which sectors of the U.S. economy contribute the most to global warming. The transportation (cars, buses, trucks, […]

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Climate Deniers Are the Hysterical Alarmists

The climate deniers in the Trump administration are at it again. On Monday, The New York Times reported that the president is silencing critical government research on climate change and creating a panel to question the scientific consensus that greenhouse gas emissions cause warming. The ultimate goal, one former Trump adviser said, is to stop […]

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River of No Return

Willard Ruzicka saw it all in a dream. The Niobrara River, which runs a few hundred feet from his family’s farmhouse in the unincorporated village of Pishelville, Nebraska, had topped its banks. But instead of water edging toward his house from the north, the dream river—somewhere upstream, in the direction of Spencer Dam—had jumped the […]

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A Novelist’s Life in America’s Underbelly

The writer Nelson Algren was an American original who, when he died in 1981, left behind a single work of literature that continues to haunt the American imagination. That work is the 1949 novel The Man With the Golden Arm, a book that has come as revelation to a good number of readers in every generation since […]

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Socialism in No Country

In her illuminating essay “The Revolutionary Tradition and its Lost Treasure”—itself a lost treasure, as so few people who consider themselves within the Western revolutionary tradition ever read or even know about it—Hannah Arendt explains a political concept Thomas Jefferson advanced toward the end of his life, involving the creation of what he called “wards” […]

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Socialism and the Democracy Deficit

What is Democratic Socialism? I read considerable talk about “the democratic” as applying to the process of getting socialism; damn little about it as an adjective applying to socialism when you get it.
  — John Dewey to James T. Farrell, 8 November, 1948 Socialism, the political economy that for a century dared not speak its name […]

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Reclaiming the Future

One day last February, I found myself seated on stage, rather incongruously, between the neoconservative Never Trumper–turned–Resistance hero Bill Kristol and my friend Natasha Lennard, a radical anti-fascist writer and activist I first met at Occupy Wall Street back in 2011. We had all made our way to the New School for the closing panel […]

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The Socialist Network

Future historians may well portray the second decade of the twenty-first century as the moment when American socialism returned from the dead. The collapse of the Soviet empire in the early 1990s had supposedly sealed the overarching terms of political dispute within the confines of the “end of history”—the abrupt cessation of ideological hostilities stoked […]

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The Audacity of Grief

It is easy to count the dead, harder to count the grieving. One has to estimate. Every year, almost one percent of the American population dies. The most recent available official count, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Vital Statistics System, is for the year 2017: 2,813,503 registered deaths. Looking at the […]

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