Tag: Past Tense

Overlooked No More: Pauline Boty, Rebellious Pop Artist

This article is part of Overlooked, a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. In Pauline Boty’s 1964 painting “It’s a Man’s World I,” archival images of famous men — Elvis, Einstein, Lenin — appear in a grid, as if on a mood board dedicated to […]

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How a Native American Resistance Held Alcatraz for 18 Months

On Nov. 20, 1969, more than 70 Native Americans gathered before dawn on a dock in San Francisco Bay. They boarded three boats and sailed from the small, foggy harbor in Sausalito, Calif., to Alcatraz Island. They intended to make landfall on territory belonging to the United States government with the intent of claiming it […]

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Overlooked No More: Annie Londonderry, Who Traveled the World by Bicycle

This article is part of Overlooked, a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. The decade before the 20th century began saw an explosion in bicycle sales and cycling in general. The so-called “safety bicycle,” with wheels of equal size and a chain mechanism that allowed […]

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Every Photo Tells a Story. His Spoke Volumes.

ImageWaiting for the “All aboard” on a platform at Pennsylvania Station. March 17, 1955.Credit…Sam Falk/The New York Times “To tell the story, completely and instantly,” was how Sam Falk described his mission as a photographer. A staff photographer at The New York Times from 1925 to 1969 — a turbulent and transformative era in American […]

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Overlooked No More: Olive Morris, Activist for Black Women’s Rights in Britain

This article is part of Overlooked, a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. Olive Morris learned early in life the consequences of fighting injustice. She was just 17 in November 1969 when she became caught up in an incident of police brutality. One minute she […]

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Your Halloween Costume Expires Sooner Than You Think

The high heels were on the move. Dozens of New York teachers marched through the streets of Greenwich Village on Oct. 31, 1986, wrapped in fabric stilettos, to cheers and applause. It was a perfectly timely costume: The ladies were dressed as the infamous footwear collection of the freshly ousted first lady of the Philippines, […]

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Overlooked No More: Sanmao, ‘Wandering Writer’ Who Found Her Voice in the Desert

This article is part of Overlooked, a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. In the early 1970s, the Taiwanese writer Sanmao saw an article about the Sahara Desert in National Geographic magazine and told her friends that she wanted to travel there and cross it. […]

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With the Guggenheim, Frank Lloyd Wright Built a Soaring and Intimate Sanctuary for Art

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is still a shock on Fifth Avenue. The architecture declines to fade into the background or get old, never mind the building turns 60 this month. Happy birthday to one of modern architecture’s transcendent achievements! Its spiral ramp has defeated generations of curators trying to figure out how […]

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This Investigator Used to Stake Out Women. Now, She Tails Men Online.

It’s a tale as old as love itself, or at least as old as the internet. Girl meets boy. Girl falls for boy. Girl starts to suspect that boy may secretly be a married father of two in Buffalo. That’s where Marie Schembri comes in. Ms. Schembri has been a private eye for more than […]

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Overlooked No More: Lotte Reiniger, Animator Who Created Magic With Scissors and Paper

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Devi Lockwood A decade before Walt Disney Productions came into existence, making its name synonymous with animated films, there was another pioneer of the art form — Lotte Reiniger. Reiniger’s filmmaking career spanned 60 years, during […]

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Garbage Fires for Freedom: When Puerto Rican Activists Took Over New York’s Streets

Hiram Maristany laughs when I call to ask him about the famous Garbage Offensive. “Like so many things with the Young Lords, you got to go backward to go forward,” he says as the sounds of East Harlem rise around him: kids yelling, the cackling bochinche of old ladies, the heavy sighs and squealing brakes […]

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Overlooked No More: Mitsuye Endo, a Name Linked to Justice for Japanese-Americans

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Stephanie Buck It was January 1942, and Japanese-American civil servants in California were alarmed. Within weeks of Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor, the state government had sent an invasive questionnaire to its employees of Japanese […]

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Paid Child Care for Working Mothers? All It Took Was a World War.

I am typing this from inside an indoor playground in Portland. We are new to town, it’s the tail end of summer and my 4-year-old daughter can’t start her new preschool until next week. It’s also raining, and our house is full of boxes. We took a bus here and paid $11 to enter, and […]

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When Filming in New York, the City Is Always the Star

One of the durable clichés of film criticism is the observation that “the city is like another character in the movie.” While I don’t have the data to prove it, my strong suspicion is that this has been said more about New York than any other city. But it’s not quite right. Really, New York […]

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Overlooked No More: Robert Johnson, Bluesman Whose Life Was a Riddle

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Reggie Ugwu Little about the life Robert Leroy Johnson lived in his brief 27 years, from approximately May 1911 until he died mysteriously in 1938, was documented. A birth certificate, if he had one, has […]

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Training Teenagers for Guerrilla Warfare in the Wealthy Suburbs? Welcome to 1969

In the last year of the 1960s, a political poster began showing up on dorm room walls. It showed a hand holding up two fingers in a peace symbol, captioned “1966.” Below that, in a second image captioned “1967,” the index finger was lowered, middle finger up. “1968” was symbolized with a raised fist. The […]

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Overlooked No More: Elizabeth A. Gloucester, ‘Richest’ Black Woman and Ally of John Brown

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Steve Bell With a fortune built largely from operating boarding homes in Brooklyn and beyond, Elizabeth A. Gloucester was considered by many to be the richest black woman in America at her death at age […]

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Was the Gap Ever Cool? A Look at 50 Years in Denim and Khaki

In 1969, Donald Fisher was a 40-year-old real estate professional who had a big problem finding Levi’s that fit him properly. His solution became the Gap. Fisher and his wife, Doris, opened the first location of the retail chain on Ocean Avenue in San Francisco, a short walk from the state university campus. For three […]

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The Most Instagrammable Neighborhood in America, Before It Was Cool

The view of the Manhattan Bridge from Dumbo has become so Instagram-famous that it has entered the realm of the Eiffel Tower and latte foam: People take pictures of it because people take pictures of it. Walter Benjamin, the German culture critic who famously warned that artworks lose their “aura” when they’re reproduced endlessly, may […]

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It’s Tough Being a Young Skyscraper in New York

The MetLife building was born with an inferiority complex. Even before construction was completed in March 1963, critics called it ugly and unwanted. It was deemed an overgrown, traffic-snarling invader on an already teeming East 42nd Street. Even worse, the tower wasn’t nearly the tallest one in New York, and the records it set smacked […]

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Overlooked No More: Alice Guy Blaché, the World’s First Female Filmmaker

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Manohla Dargis In 1911, The Moving Picture News wrote that Alice Guy Blaché, the first female filmmaker in history, was a “fine example of what a woman can do if given a square chance in […]

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Overlooked No More: Elizabeth Rona, Pioneering Scientist Amid Dangers of War

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Veronique Greenwood The phone call for Elizabeth Rona came to the Budapest university where she worked: Don’t go to the theater, the caller warned. Rona, who was celebrating her 29th birthday, had planned to meet […]

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Overlooked No More: Lau Sing Kee, War Hero Jailed for Helping Immigrants

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Andrew R. Chow Lau Sing Kee was an American war hero, but he was also mocked as a “Chinese boy.” He was a civic leader, but he also became a convicted criminal for skirting discriminatory […]

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