Tag: Past Tense

The Most Instagrammable Neighborhood in America, Before It Was Cool

The view of the Manhattan Bridge from Dumbo has become so Instagram-famous that it has entered the realm of the Eiffel Tower and latte foam: People take pictures of it because people take pictures of it. Walter Benjamin, the German culture critic who famously warned that artworks lose their “aura” when they’re reproduced endlessly, may […]

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It’s Tough Being a Young Skyscraper in New York

The MetLife building was born with an inferiority complex. Even before construction was completed in March 1963, critics called it ugly and unwanted. It was deemed an overgrown, traffic-snarling invader on an already teeming East 42nd Street. Even worse, the tower wasn’t nearly the tallest one in New York, and the records it set smacked […]

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Overlooked No More: Alice Guy Blaché, the World’s First Female Filmmaker

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Manohla Dargis In 1911, The Moving Picture News wrote that Alice Guy Blaché, the first female filmmaker in history, was a “fine example of what a woman can do if given a square chance in […]

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Overlooked No More: Elizabeth Rona, Pioneering Scientist Amid Dangers of War

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Veronique Greenwood The phone call for Elizabeth Rona came to the Budapest university where she worked: Don’t go to the theater, the caller warned. Rona, who was celebrating her 29th birthday, had planned to meet […]

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Overlooked No More: Lau Sing Kee, War Hero Jailed for Helping Immigrants

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Andrew R. Chow Lau Sing Kee was an American war hero, but he was also mocked as a “Chinese boy.” He was a civic leader, but he also became a convicted criminal for skirting discriminatory […]

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Commuting Has Always Been Soul-Crushing, but There Are Inspiring Options

As a matter of principle, it shouldn’t be such misery to get somewhere you don’t even want to go. That’s why commuting to work can awaken elemental feelings of dread, powerlessness and rage. You strategize. You wake early. You wedge your body into an obscenely packed subway or inch your car along a planet-killing freeway. […]

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Overlooked No More: Rani of Jhansi, India’s Warrior Queen Who Fought the British

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Alisha Haridasani Gupta By the time Laxmibai was a teenager, she had already violated many of the expectations for women in India’s patriarchal society. She could read and write. She had learned to ride a […]

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Overlooked No More: Laxmibai, India’s Warrior Queen Who Fought the British

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Alisha Haridasani Gupta By the time Laxmibai was a teenager, she had already violated many of the expectations for women in India’s patriarchal society. She could read and write. She had learned to ride a […]

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At ‘Black Woodstock,’ an All-Star Lineup Delivered Joy and Renewal to 300,000

Woodstock was big and messy, thrilling and stirring — and summed up finally by Jimi Hendrix, whose festival-closing set included his towering, take-a-knee reading of the national anthem. It was an admixture of disaffection and patriotism, bold as love and black as hell. But Hendrix was one of the few black musicians at an event […]

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Overlooked No More: William Byron Rumford, Pioneering Black Politician in California

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Conor Dougherty When William Byron Rumford Sr. arrived at his hotel in Sacramento the night before starting his first term in the California state legislature, a clerk told him there were no rooms available. But […]

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Toni Morrison Dancing: Photos of the Author at Work and Play

There’s an image that will stay with me forever: Toni Morrison, Bill T. Jones and Max Roach were all onstage together. Toni Morrison read her beautiful text, Max Roach was at the drums and Bill T. Jones was dancing. And at the end of the evening, Jones took Morrison in his arms and waltzed across […]

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Overlooked No More: Georgia Gilmore, Who Fed and Funded the Montgomery Bus Boycott

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Klancy Miller It took all of Georgia Gilmore’s willpower not to explode at the driver of the crowded bus in Montgomery, Ala., one Friday afternoon in October 1955. She had just boarded and dropped her […]

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The Long and Surprising History of Roller Derby

It sounds like a human freight train: wheels clattering around the turns, bodies thumping against each other, toe stops shrieking against the track. A rainbow of hair and wheels goes by in a blur, shouts and grunts punctuating the din. It’s part endurance race, part wrestling match, combining strategy, athleticism and camp. And it’s all […]

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Overlooked No More: Gertrude Benham, Who Climbed the World One Mountain at a Time

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Emma Goldberg If ever a pair of boots could reveal their wearer’s life story, it might be those of the intrepid mountaineer Gertrude Benham. Benham’s boots, made of brown leather and on display at the […]

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When Corporate Lobbies Started to Look Like Museum Galleries

The Seagram liquor company and the ancient Mesoamerican civilization of the Olmecs were not obvious bedfellows. But in 1965, a crane operator lowered a colossal Olmec sculpture of a head onto the corporation’s Manhattan doorstep. The artwork was awe-inspiring enough that its next stop was the World’s Fair, but, for a time, it sat in […]

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Overlooked No More: Florence Merriam Bailey, Who Defined Modern Bird-Watching

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Jonathan Wolfe In 1886, Manhattan was one of the richest bird-watching areas on the planet. One ornithologist from the American Museum of Natural History counted 40 distinct species on two walks in the city, including […]

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Ed Dwight Was Set to Be the First Black Astronaut. Here’s Why That Never Happened.

The bone-rattling trip to the upper reaches of Earth’s atmosphere used to require a steady hand, a powerful jet and the precision of an airman ready to dodge enemy fire. The dangers were immense. You could black out. Gravitational force could pull blood from your eyes, rendering you sightless. Or you could merely end up […]

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Ebony Memories: A Photo Treasury

[Race affects our lives in countless ways. To read provocative stories on race from The Times, sign up here for our weekly Race/Related newsletter.] CHICAGO — For months, a stream of visitors — curious, cultured and deep-pocketed — have slipped into a drab brick warehouse on the West Side of Chicago. They have been escorted […]

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