Tag: November 2019

Oligarch of the Month: The Sacklers

Not so long ago, the Sackler name was stamped across the most rarified perches in Manhattan—in the psychobiology department at Columbia University, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and at the Museum of Natural History. Lately, though, we’ve been seeing the Sackler moniker in far less esteemed venues, as a cluster of lawsuits have uncovered […]

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The Freshman Democrat Who’s Making Conservatives Squirm

Unlike some of her fellow freshmen, Representative Katie Porter of California has managed to escape the ire of the current occupant of the White House. While she isn’t exactly rushing to take part in the Squad’s frequent Twitter smackdowns with the president, she is on friendly terms with the four women who make up the […]

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Fukuyama’s Inner Civic Republicanism (Part 1)

In his recently published study Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment, Francis Fukuyama wants to modify his best-known thesis, published first as a 1989 essay, “The End of History?,” then as a book-length treatment in 1992, The End of History and the Last Man. The word “end,” he now says, was […]

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Sea of Troubles

In June, I joined the crew of the rescue ship Alan Kurdi. It was a cantankerous old brute of a boat, a former East German research vessel that now belongs to a small German nonprofit called Sea-Eye. “You are an eye on the sea,” the crew manager told us at our first briefing on board, […]

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The Art of the Unspeakable

In 1971, the artist Suzanne Lacy was taking classes with Judy Chicago at the California Institute of the Arts, and she had an idea: What if they created a performance that involved an audience listening to recordings of women telling their stories of rape? It sounds simple now but it wasn’t then, because those kinds […]

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Fox and Foes

In August, President Donald Trump noticed something odd on Fox News—a poll had shown multiple Democrats beating him in an election. Enraged, he told reporters that there was “something going on” at the network. “We have to start looking for a new News Outlet,” he later tweeted. “Fox isn’t working for us anymore!”
 In a […]

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Olga Tokarczuk’s Gripping Eco-Mystery

Murder mysteries, however else they might differ, rely on one major, shared belief: that murder matters, and is worth looking into. Whoever did the killing, whoever was killed, the investigation moves forward because the people inside the story and those outside of it, following along as the clues unfold, agree that the murder has moral […]

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Huawei delays Mate X folding 5G phone until end of 2019

Huawei originally expected its folding smartphone-tablet hybrid, Mate X, to ship in June, but delayed the device until September for “extra” tests. Now the 5G phone is being pushed back again, with a promised release by the end of 2019, potentially but not certainly November. Mate X was the star of a glitzy Huawei event […]

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