Tag: Monuments and Memorials (Structures)

‘Huddled Masses’ in Statue of Liberty Poem Are European, Trump Official Says

Kenneth T. Cuccinelli II, one of the Trump administration’s top immigration officials, set off a controversy this week with comments about “The New Colossus,” the 136-year-old sonnet at the base of the Statue of Liberty. “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,” reads the poem, by Emma Lazarus. But […]

Read More

What Changed in Charlottesville

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Two years ago this week, hundreds of white nationalists descended on Charlottesville, Va., under the pretense of protesting the city’s decision to remove a monument to Robert E. Lee from a public park. They were joined by old-guard white supremacists like David Duke, and before they were through, a young man, inspired […]

Read More

Rome’s New Rules: No Sitting on the Monuments (and No Wading Either)

Maiken Offerdal of Norway and her teenage sons were just sitting down on Rome’s famed Spanish Steps on Wednesday when they heard two shrieks of a whistle. A police officer walked over and tut-tutted: No sitting, he said sternly. Never mind the long tradition of lounging on the fabled spot — a scene perhaps best […]

Read More

Emmett Till Sign Photo Leads Ole Miss Fraternity to Suspend Members

Three students at the University of Mississippi were suspended by their fraternity on Wednesday after an Instagram photo surfaced of them brandishing guns in front of a bullet-riddled memorial sign for Emmett Till, whose brutal murder in 1955 served as a catalyst for the civil rights movement. The photo of the smiling Kappa Alpha members […]

Read More

How Notre-Dame Was Saved: 5 Things We Know

How was it that fire ravaged Notre-Dame? And how was it saved? A New York Times investigation found that a miscommunication among security employees and flawed planning let the fire spin out of control in one of France’s most revered monuments on April 15. When the firefighters were called, it was already too late to […]

Read More

Angered by This Roosevelt Statue? A Museum Wants Visitors to Weigh In

There’s a quote that takes up its own wall at the American Museum of Natural History’s newest exhibition: It’s more important to tell the truth about the president — pleasant or unpleasant — than about anyone else. The words were written, in fact, by a president: Theodore Roosevelt. A century later, it’s hard to know […]

Read More

New York Named a Bridge After Him. Now, Kosciuszko Is Getting His Due at Home.

KOSAVA, Belarus — Thomas Jefferson hailed him as the “purest son of liberty I have ever known.” New York named a bridge, a street and swimming pool after him to celebrate his role in the American War of Independence. Poland reveres him as the leader of a late-18th-century revolt against the Russian empire. So what […]

Read More

2019 Belongs to Shirley Chisholm

Shirley Chisholm stares out from the side of a dozen coffee mugs these days, her epochal glasses, brocade dresses and distinct crown of curls recognizable trademarks of the most regenerative political figure in modern American culture. As a number of new congresswomen begin to emerge in her image, Ms. Chisholm, who 50 years ago began […]

Read More

Let Trump Have His Birthday Party for America

President Trump’s Fourth of July extravaganza has already achieved what was surely one of its central aims: irritating his opponents. That helps explain the mainlining of partisan politics into a traditionally apolitical celebration of the nation’s founding. And why taxpayers are footing the bill for a military review inspired by a French parade that caught […]

Read More

What Should Happen to Confederate Statues? A City Auctions One for $1.4 Million

It happened by city decree in the dark of night, or by civic demand at the hands of protesters. When the movement to reckon with Confederate symbols swept the nation, monuments that had long stood in city parks and on college campuses were suddenly dismantled. There was often no clear plan for the future, and […]

Read More

Supreme Court Allows 40-Foot Peace Cross Honoring War Dead on State Property

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court ruled on Thursday that a 40-foot cross honoring soldiers who died in World War I could remain on state property in suburban Maryland. The cross, justices said, did not violate the First Amendment’s ban on government establishment of religion. The decision was fractured, and the seven justices in the majority […]

Read More

New York’s Tribute to the ‘Tombs Angel’: Lost, Found, Now Restored

No less a critic than Charles Dickens was appalled by the way New York in the 19th century housed its prisoners in the dank, overcrowded and smelly precincts of “the Tombs,” the city jail in lower Manhattan. “Such indecent and disgusting dungeons as these cells, would bring disgrace upon the most despotic empire in the […]

Read More

Trump Sets Off Fireworks of a Different Sort With Fourth of July Speech Plan

WASHINGTON — Since early in his tenure, President Trump has sought to stage a military parade through the heart of Washington, only to be thwarted. So now he has settled on the next best thing: He will take over an existing patriotic display in the capital. The Trump administration has ordered major changes in the […]

Read More

50 Years Later, What We Forgot About Stonewall

It’s L.G.B.T.Q. Pride Month, and you’re reading In Her Words. With every edition for the next four weeks, we’ll be sharing a little history about the events or people that shaped L.G.B.T.Q. rights. Sign up here to get In Her Words delivered to your inbox. Let me know what you think at dearmaya@nytimes.com. “As long […]

Read More

Two Transgender Activists Are Getting a Monument in New York

Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, pioneering transgender activists who were at the vanguard of the gay rights movement, will be immortalized in a monument that may be placed down the street from the Stonewall Inn, the city said on Wednesday. Ms. Johnson and Ms. Rivera were both drag performers and vibrant characters in Greenwich […]

Read More

100 Years of Memorial Day Commemorations

You’re reading this week’s At War newsletter. Sign up here to get it delivered to your inbox every Friday. Email us at atwar@nytimes.com. This morning, At War published an account by Luke Ryan about the day he lost his best friend and three other teammates to a buried explosive in Kandahar Province. They were killed […]

Read More

Female Veterans, and a Memorial to Them, Struggle to Honor Women Who Served

ARLINGTON, Va. — The advancing front of tourists in matching T-shirts, squinting toward the gently rolling hillsides covered with gravestones, made its way into America’s most famous cemetery by walking right past its grand, ceremonial entrance with barely a glance. Inside those granite walls, with fountains, glass panels and gold relief, is the nation’s only […]

Read More

When the Names on Campus Buildings Evoke a Racist Past

College campuses have long been centers of social foment and student activism. In the 1960s, they were magnets for protests over the Vietnam War, and more recently, the Black Lives Matter movement forced schools to confront issues of racial justice and inclusion. The debate continues at many universities over whether the names of prominent racists […]

Read More