Tag: Monuments and Memorials (Structures)

Nikki Haley’s Confederate Flag Comments Spark Backlash

Nikki Haley, the former South Carolina governor, came under criticism on Friday after she told a conservative radio host that the Confederate flag symbolized “service, sacrifice and heritage” for some people in her state until Dylann S. Roof “hijacked” it. Mr. Roof, the avowed white supremacist who killed nine black parishioners when he opened fire […]

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Why Did U.N.C. Give Millions to a Neo-Confederate Group?

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — Late in the afternoon on Thanksgiving Eve, the board of the University of North Carolina System announced that it would give $2.5 million to a neo-Confederate organization to acquire and house a monument known as “Silent Sam.” The monument, topped by a statue of a Confederate soldier carrying a rifle, was […]

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How Charlottesville’s Echoes Forced New Zealand to Confront Its History

HAMILTON, New Zealand — An 80-year-old Maori man walked up to a statue of a colonial-era British naval commander one winter morning in 2018, a can of paint and a claw hammer in his hands. “The red paint was to change the way he looked, and the hammer was to break his nose,” said the […]

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They Keep Times Square in Order, and a Statue Front and Center

Damon Dorsey was 23 and searching for a job when he stumbled upon an opening in Times Square’s security department. More than 15 years later, every shift still brings something new. One night in late September, it was a 27-foot-tall monument. Mr. Dorsey was there for the installation of Kehinde Wiley’s “Rumors of War,” a […]

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The Death of the Black Utopia

New York City embraced willful amnesia when landscapers working at the western edge of Central Park unearthed two coffins in August of 1871. An engraved plate on a richly appointed rosewood coffin identified the deceased as Margaret McIntay, buried two decades earlier at the age of “sixteen years, three months and fourteen days.” A more […]

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University of North Carolina Gives ‘Silent Sam’ Statue to Confederate Group

Ever since protesters toppled a Confederate statue known as Silent Sam at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill last year, the college has hidden the monument from view, stashing it in storage and refusing to disclose its location. But after 15 months of hand-wringing over what to do with the statue, the university […]

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Confederate Statue in North Carolina Comes Down After 112 Years

A Confederate monument in the small town of Pittsboro, N.C., was removed early Wednesday from the spot outside a courthouse where it had stood for 112 years, county officials said, bringing to an end months of debate and occasionally violent protests over its presence. Crews worked for several hours on Tuesday night and into Wednesday […]

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New Statue Unsettles Italian City: Is It Celebrating a Poet or a Nationalist?

TRIESTE, Italy — On a recent afternoon, a little girl gently patted the shoulder of a statue of the Italian writer Gabriele d’Annunzio, depicted sitting cross-legged and reading on a bench in a central square. “This is a girl who shows respect,” said Rosa Cacioppo Mantini, a 92-year-old retired high school literature teacher and committed […]

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I Watched Friends Die in Afghanistan. The Guilt Has Nearly Killed Me.

When my grandfather Michael Linehan Jr. arrived in North Africa in December 1943 to begin his tour of duty with the 15th Air Force, the average life expectancy of an Allied heavy-bomber crewman was roughly six combat missions, less than a fourth of what he was required to fly. As the 25-year-old pilot of a […]

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‘I Have Waited 68 Years to See This’: How Honor Flights Help Veterans Reflect

In 2004, shortly after the national World War II Memorial was completed, Earl Morse, a retired Air Force captain working at the Department of Veterans Affairs clinic in Springfield, Ohio, realized that many of the veterans he knew would never get to see it. So he persuaded pilots at his local flying club to ferry […]

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An Artist’s March to Freedom

Surfacing Dread Scott’s re-enactment of a slave rebellion in Louisiana will draw on hundreds of participants — and bold ideas of freedom. ImageSammi Ross, rehearsing in costume for the 1811 Slave Rebellion Re-enactment, a 26-mile march along former antebellum plantations in Louisiana. Her great-great-grandmother was part of the original slave rebellion. “My family has been […]

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New York’s Race to Build Monuments Runs Into Friction on the Ground

A vote this month over one of New York City’s new, more inclusive monuments became so combative — with audience members shouting “How dare you!” — that the acclaimed artist who won the commission walked away from the job. And many Catholics were incensed when City Hall omitted Mother Cabrini, the patron saint of immigrants, […]

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Their Land Became Part of Central Park. They’re Coming Back in a Monument.

In Central Park, about a mile from land that was once home to Seneca Village, a mostly black community forced out by the park’s creation in the 1850s, the city is planning a privately funded monument to a revered black family from that time. The new addition to New York’s landscape, honoring the Lyons family, […]

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‘Racist’ Snub of Mother Cabrini? Cuomo Needles de Blasio

If Mayor Bill de Blasio and the actor Chazz Palminteri got into a dispute, which side do you think Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo would be on? A few hints. Mr. Cuomo and Mr. de Blasio, both Democrats, are New York’s most famous frenemies, and the governor seldom bypasses a juicy opportunity to tweak the mayor. […]

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Debating Historic Monuments, Live on Radio, in Time for Columbus Day

Weather: The sky clears as the day goes on, with a high in the low 70s. Alternate-side parking: Suspended today for Columbus Day and Sukkot. ImageCreditMike Pont/Getty Images for Bronx Children’s Museum The dust-up, on live radio, between an Italian-American actor and a progressive Italian-American mayor over an Italian-American saint, was just in time for […]

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Retracing the Spanish Path of My Ancestor, the Founder of the Whitney

Standing on the banks of the sparkling Rio Odiel in Spain, I watched the sun set over this wide estuary that stretches out to marshy grasses and the Atlantic Ocean beyond. Here, in a park full of palm trees in the southwestern port city of Huelva, soars a 114-foot-tall limestone statue of Christopher Columbus. My […]

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Kara Walker Takes a Monumental Jab at Britannia

LONDON — The Queen Victoria Memorial, centerpiece of the plaza that fronts Buckingham Palace, is possibly the most bombastic of this city’s monuments to British grandeur. Beside Victoria, queen and empress, glowering toward the Mall, is a cascade of allegorical statuary representing Courage and Constancy, Truth and Justice, Manufacture and Agriculture, Peace and Progress, and […]

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Unveiling Monument to Migrants, Pope Francis Urges Compassion for Refugees

VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis has always urged compassion and charity toward the refugees of the world. But on Sunday, during a special Mass on the 105th World Day of Migrants and Refugees, he unveiled a monument to migration in St. Peter’s Square as a homage to the displaced. The work, “Angels Unaware,” by the […]

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Kehinde Wiley’s Times Square Monument: That’s No Robert E. Lee

He looks like a man lost in time, displaced, with the horse he rode in on, from a previous century, perhaps, or was it a future one? In a riot of flashing neon signs and costumed avengers, populating a patch of Times Square on Broadway between 46th and 47th streets, he can be seen looking […]

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Why the Internet Thinks Cuomo Rigged N.Y.’s License Plate Contest

ALBANY — It seemed, at first glance, to be an innocuous idea. Late last month, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo announced that he would sponsor a “statewide survey” to allow New York State residents to vote on the design for new license plates, featuring a number of landmarks. Four of the five options were strikingly similar: […]

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Slavery and the Holocaust: How Americans and Germans Cope With Past Evils

LEARNING FROM THE GERMANSRace and the Memory of Evil By Susan Neiman What can be compared to the Holocaust? Everything? Detention camps on America’s border? Nothing? This history war, generally the province of academics, has recently become part of American political discourse. Into this discussion comes Susan Neiman’s “Learning From the Germans.” Neiman, who has […]

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Althea Gibson, Tennis Star Ahead of Her Time, Gets Her Due at Last

In the summer of 1950, the national women’s tennis championships at the West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills, Queens, reached a turning point. On one side was the favorite, Louise Brough, a blond Californian and the reigning Wimbledon champion. On the other side was the rangy, Harlem-raised Althea Gibson. She was not only the […]

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