Tag: internal-sub-only-nl

Biden Makes an Appeal on State Legislative Races

President Biden became involved in state legislative races for the first time, with an email Friday asking Democrats to each donate the modest sum of $7 to his party’s campaign arm for statehouse elections. And, following his Sept. 1 speech lashing “MAGA Republicans,” Biden is framing the stakes as a battle for American democracy, coupled […]

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Stop Making Asian Americans Pay the Price for Campus Diversity

Deep down, I suspect we all know that it would be quite possible for students to get a sterling education at a university where every student was a white person from Colorado. Few graduates would muse that their education was incomplete because there were no kids from the Northeast or the South around. Any benefit […]

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Liz Truss’s Tax Cuts Won’t Help Britain’s Economy

Britain is in a very difficult economic position. The British economy, like the U.S. economy, seems to be seriously overheated, with substantial amounts of inflation driven by high domestic demand. Unlike America, it is also facing the full force of Europe’s energy crisis, driven by the efforts of President Vladimir Putin of Russia to use […]

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Secretary of State Races Turn Rowdy During the Homestretch

In a normal election year, races for secretary of state are sleepy affairs, and their campaigns struggle for media coverage amid the hurly-burly of more prominent Senate, governor and House contests. This year, however, is anything but normal. Democrats are pouring millions of dollars into races for secretary of state, buoyed by the nature of […]

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Public Schools Will Be on the Ballot in November

Nearly every parent I spoke to acknowledged, unprompted, how privileged they were to be able to move their children to a new situation, and lamented that this wasn’t an option for all families. Most described themselves as Democrats, supportive of public schools in general and supportive of teachers in particular. Some described their own experiences […]

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What Explains the Alarming Democrat-on-Democrat Sabotage in North Carolina?

“It is the sleeper issue of our time,” he added. (Peggy Sweeney, Sarasota, Fla., and Marjorie Ivey, St. Louis) Also in The Post, Olivier Knox wrote: “President Biden is off today to New York and the annual diplomatic cacophony that is the United Nations General Assembly — call it the UNGA din.” (Conrad Macina, Landing, […]

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Elise Stefanik Says She’s Confident a Republican Wave Is Coming to the House

Today’s newsletter is a guest dispatch from Annie Karni, a congressional correspondent in Washington. Representative Elise Stefanik of New York, the No. 3 House Republican, predicted on Wednesday that her party would pick up as many as three dozen House seats in November, despite signs that the red wave many predicted months ago might not […]

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Despite the Covid disruption, school test score declines look pretty modest

If this outcome had been known with perfect clarity back in the spring of 2020, what would the public response have been? Surely some would have objected to closures, including those who didn’t see the pandemic as much of a threat. But overall I don’t think that parents, teachers and administrators or political leaders would […]

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The Midlife Crisis Is Very Real and Nothing to Be Laughed At

In popular culture the midlife crisis is fodder for comedy, personified by the 40-something guy who suddenly hankers to sky-dive or buy a convertible. In scientific circles the midlife crisis is sometimes said not to exist at all: “Epidemiological study of psychological distress in adulthood does not suggest that midlife is a time of out-of-the-ordinary […]

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For Churches, Abortion Politics Is a Double-Edged Sword

In the ensuing public uproar, support for the church collapsed. “It basically goes from being one of the most trusted public institutions to not only losing support in the faith world, but being unable to counter referendums on abortion and on gay marriage,” Grzymala-Busse said. “It’s now a political non-presence in Ireland because the scale […]

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Donors Worry About a Cash Crunch for Voter Registration Groups

Several nonprofit groups that work to register voters are privately sounding the alarm about their finances, warning donors that they will have to begin scaling back their programs just as the country enters the homestretch of the midterm elections. It is a critical time. Today is National Voter Registration Day, and deadlines to register are […]

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Who gets to use gas?

According to the International Energy Agency, 600 million people in Africa lack access to electricity, and 970 million live without low-pollution cooking fuels, which consigns mostly women and girls to burning charcoal and wood in their kitchens. More shocking, a smaller share of the population has access to electricity today than in 2019, before the […]

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Perfectly Reasonable Question: Can We Trust the Polls?

Last Monday, I wrote about the early “warning signs” in this year’s Senate polling. Then three days later, I helped write up the results of a new national survey: a New York Times/Siena College poll showing Democrats up by two percentage points in the generic ballot among registered voters. If you thought that was a […]

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Warnings From Authors Who Track Domestic Extremism

It is rare that a chill runs down my spine when I’m interviewing someone. But that’s precisely what happened when I spoke recently with Luke Mogelson and Andy Campbell, the authors of two new books on homegrown extremism and the threat it poses to American democracy. Mogelson, a staff writer for The New Yorker, wrote […]

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What the Martha’s Vineyard Stunt Says About the Trump Wannabes

Ron DeSantis, the Republican governor of Florida, likes to do stunts. It is a key part of how he’s built his reputation as a fighter for conservative causes — a reputation he hopes to ride to the White House. We saw one of those stunts this week when, using a promise of assistance, he lured […]

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Wonking Out: What Ukraine Needs From Us

Lately I’ve been seeing what seems like a growing number of reports about Ukraine’s economic difficulties. And it definitely makes sense to focus more on the country’s economy now that the tide seems to have turned in Ukraine’s favor on the battlefield. But it’s hard to avoid suspecting ulterior motives for that scrutiny. Supporters of […]

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Trying to Prove You’re Not a Racist

Since I started writing this newsletter, once about every couple of weeks I have received a missive from someone troubled by a controversy involving race, usually in the workplace. These readers feel that their opponents in these fusses are unfairly tarring them as racist. Typical disputes they find themselves embroiled in include whether a school […]

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The climate philanthropists

Yvon Chouinard, the founder of Patagonia, on Wednesday revealed that he and his family had given away the company and that all future profits from the apparel maker would go toward fighting the climate crisis. It’s a groundbreaking act of philanthropy. In voluntarily forfeiting all their shares in Patagonia, which is valued at more than […]

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The Political Calculations Behind DeSantis’s Migrant Flights North

Ron DeSantis, the Republican governor of Florida, one-upped his Texas counterpart, Greg Abbott, this week by sending two planeloads of migrants to Martha’s Vineyard in Massachusetts — the cherry on top of a monthslong campaign to essentially troll liberal cities and states by transferring many asylum seekers to those communities. The airlift, a spokeswoman for […]

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Herschel Walker Tests the Importance of ‘Candidate Quality’

Mehmet Oz could prevail over John Fetterman in Pennsylvania’s Senate election and, well, I’m not sure what that would mean. The carnival (and crudités) of that contest precludes tidy lessons. And it’s impossible to know what voters will or won’t make of Fetterman’s stroke earlier this year. Ron Johnson could defeat Mandela Barnes in Wisconsin, […]

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What School Anxiety Dreams Teach Us About Ourselves

Right before my children went back to school this month, I had one of my most frequently recurring stress dreams. As usual, it was this version of a partially true experience: I am a few credits away from graduating from college, and I realize I have a Russian history test that I have not studied […]

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China Is Writing the Story of the Climate Future

First, it turns out that the country isn’t as big as we thought it was — and it is on track to get quite a bit smaller. The U.N. now projects that China’s population may drop by as much as half by the end of the century, as it also ages steeply — a prediction […]

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Bill Gates: ‘We’re in a Worse Place Than I Expected’

Well, it’s always fascinating to see that the varieties of maize that you use in the United States, they keep marching north. But eventually you get hot enough that you can’t even use maize. Maize is very temperature sensitive. You can reduce that only somewhat. Unfortunately, there are other crops like sorghum that evolve to […]

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The crown and climate

The new king of Britain, Charles III, has long been outspoken on conservation and climate change. So I want to use today’s newsletter to fill in some context about Charles, the institution he represents, and his country’s efforts to tackle global warming. The weight of history The Industrial Revolution was born in England in the […]

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A Look at the Misery Index and Inflation

Back when inflation was first taking off in the late 1960s and early 1970s, Arthur Okun — an economist who served John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson — suggested a quick-and-dirty measure of the state of the economy. His Economic Discomfort Index — which Ronald Reagan later renamed the Misery Index — was just the […]

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Why Things May Really Be Different for This Midterm Election

Just about every election cycle, there’s an argument for why, this time, things might be different — different from expectations based on historical trends and key factors like the state of the economy or the president’s approval rating. The arguments are often pretty plausible. After all, every cycle is different. There’s almost always something unprecedented […]

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Yes, the Polling Warning Signs Are Flashing Again

Ahead of the last presidential election, we created a website tracking the latest polls — internally, we called it a “polling diary.” Despite a tough polling cycle, one feature proved to be particularly helpful: a table showing what would happen if the 2020 polls were as “wrong” as they were in 2016, when pollsters systematically […]

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Why the U.S. Is Being Ominously Compared to Hungary and Turkey

First, society polarizes, often over a backlash to social change, to demographic change, to strengthening political power by racial, ethnic or religious minorities, and generally amid rising social distrust. How Times reporters cover politics. We rely on our journalists to be independent observers. So while Times staff members may vote, they are not allowed to endorse […]

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