Tag: Income disparity

The Planetary Health Diet Isn’t Much Use to People Living in Food Poverty

Yves here. Mass market food producers have not been good actors in promoting a healthy diet. Among other things, adding sugar to products makes them taste better and “snacks, drinks, and processed foods that are high in sugar have the highest profit margins.” By Anya Pearson, a freelance journalist and editor, and guitarist in feminist […]

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Brexit: Blame It on the Banking Crisis

Yves here. This post on Brexit reminds me of Tom Ferguson’s district-by-district analysis of the special Senate election in 2010 after Ted Kennedy died, where the win by Republican Scott Brown meant the Democrats lost their filibuster-proof majority in the Senate, a fact the Obama Administration used for meeting the Republicans more than half way. […]

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France’s Great Debate

Yves here. Wowsers, does Macron not know basic French history? The last time a ruler asked la toute France for its opinion about the problems of the day, the situation developed not necessarily to his advantage. From Wikipedia: The Cahiers de doléances (or simply Cahiers as they were often known) were the lists of grievances […]

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Ray Dalio: Capitalism Isn’t Working

By Chris Becker. Originally published at MacroBusiness It’s always interesting to hear mega-capitalists complain about the very system that provides them opportunity to turn their talents into Scrooge McDuck size piles of cash. Furthermore, it’s usually the most successful that have the most liberal of views and Ray Dalio, head of hedge fund Bridgewater, has weighed […]

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GoFundMe CEO: ‘Gigantic Gaps’ In Health System Showing Up In Crowdfunding

By Rachel Bluth, Reporter for Kaiser Health News and Peggy Girshman Fellow. She was previously the lead political correspondent for the Annapolis Bureau of Capital News Service and has also written for the Maryland Reporter and the Prince George’s Sentinel. Originally published at Kaiser Health News Scrolling through the GoFundMe website reveals seemingly an endless […]

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What Truck Drivers Say about “Driver Shortage” & Pay Increases

Yves here. Of course, one then wonders how many of the other worker shortage stories are exaggerated. And remember that profits have been at record levels as a percentage of GDP, so the idea that most companies can’t pay more is spurious. By Wolf Richter, a San Francisco based executive, entrepreneur, start up specialist, and […]

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$15 Minimum Wage: Job Killer or Path Out of Poverty?

This Real News Network segment sets forth the most common arguments against increasing the minimum wage to $15 an hour, or alternatively, a living wage level, and shows why they don’t hold up to scrutiny. A decent minimum wage is even more important when the supposedly robust US economy is increasingly creating McJobs. JAISAL NOOR: […]

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The Downside of Market-Minded Philanthropy

By David Campbell, Associate Professor of Public Administration, Binghamton University, State University of New York. Originally published at The Conversation Billionaires made some eye-popping donations in 2018. Amazon founder Jeff Bezos announced plans to spend US$2 billion to help the homeless and create a network of free preschools. Media mogul and former New York City […]

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Thoughts on Warren and Sanders: How Much Change Is Needed in 2021?

Yves here. I know Warren is deemed to be progressive by American standards, but I recall clearly when I first say her speak at a Roosevelt Institute conference, Let Markets Be Markets, which was a title I found to be unhelpful, since it suggested that markets would exist in a state of nature and just […]

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How Shocking Was Shock Therapy?

By Barkley Rosser, Professor of Economics at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. Originally published at EconoSpeak In 2007 Naomi Klein got quite a bit of attention and mostly favorable comment for her  book, Shock Doctrine.  It promulgated that global elites used periods of crisis around the world to force damaging neoliberal policies derived from […]

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Here’s What a Real Strike Looks Like: 150 Million Say No to Despotism in India

Yves here. Even though the gilet jaunes are getting a lot of interest due to the vivid images of damage to Paris, other important protests for labor and against inequality are being neglected by the Western media. One is against anti-labor “reforms” in India. By  Vijay Prashad, an Indian historian, editor and journalist. He is […]

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Wolf Richter: Housing Bubble Trouble in Silicon Valley & San Francisco

By Wolf Richter, a San Francisco based executive, entrepreneur, start up specialist, and author, with extensive international work experience. Originally published at Wolf Street Housing inventory listed for sale in the two counties that make up Silicon Valley – San Mateo County and Santa Clara County – and in the county of San Francisco, surged […]

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Richard Murphy: Davos Wants a Better Measure of Failure

Yves here. Unfortunately, the Davos man is still very much with us. And now they want us to think that they care. Gah. By Richard Murphy, a chartered accountant and a political economist. He has been described by the Guardian newspaper as an “anti-poverty campaigner and tax expert”. He is Professor of Practice in International Political Economy […]

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Starting the New Year Badly and Well

By Thomas Neuburger (aka Gaius) Originally published at DownWithTyranny! BREAKING: Gov. Jay Inslee to offer pardons for thousands with misdemeanor pot convictions https://t.co/EesejA88hz via @seattletimes — Jim Brunner (@Jim_Brunner) January 4, 2019 As we gear up for the full blast of the next new year, I want to offer a selection of items for your […]

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Piketty’s World Inequality Review: A Critical Analysis

Yves here. It’s surprising to see Piketty and even more so, one of this co-authors, Gabriel Zucman, make such strong claims for tax data as a way to measure income inequality. The rich and super rich engage in tax avoidance and evasion, to the degree that Zucman has estimated that 6% of the world’s wealth […]

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Intergenerational Mobility in the US: One Size Doesn’t Fit All

By Juan C. Palomino, Research Officer, Institute for New Economic Thinking, University of Oxford; Gustavo A. Marrero, Professor of Economics and Director, Research Center of Social Inequality and Governance (CEDESOG), University of La Laguna; and Juan Gabriel Rodríguez, Professor of Economics, Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Originally published at VoxEU The American Dream is grounded in […]

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Basic Income vs Guaranteed Jobs: What If We Paid Stay-At-Home Moms?

By Stephanie Ervin, who heads up Civic Ventures’ special projects and is co-creator of the podcast Pitchfork Economics. Ervin specializes in community organizing, outreach, and public policy matters. Cross-posted from Evonomics. Rising income inequality coupled with the fear that robots will soon occupy more jobs than average Americans has everyone calling for the creation of […]

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How the International Monetary Fund Imposes Its Economic Policies on Argentina

By Celina della Croce of the Independent Media Institute. Cross-posted from Alternet. In September, Argentine president Mauricio Macri accepted the 2018 Atlantic Council’s Global Citizen Award. In attendance were many of world’s neoliberal power players and policy makers, among them International Monetary Fund (IMF) Managing Director Christine Lagarde. Facing the crowd, Macri gleefully admitted that […]

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The Decline of African-American and Hispanic Wealth Since the Great Recession

Lambert here: It could be there’s a lesson here about selection criteria for Presidents in “our democracy.” Edward Wolff, Professor of Economics, New York University. Originally published at VoxEU. Unlike income inequality, wealth inequality along racial lines in the US has received relatively little attention. This column presents new evidence on the changing landscape of […]

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