Tag: Hawaii

On Hawaii, the Fight for Taro’s Revival

ImageThe taro fields of the Waipa Foundation, on the north shore of the island of Kauai. The foundation focuses on ecological restoration.Credit…Scott Conarroe The root vegetable was a staple food for centuries until contact with the West. Its return signals a reclamation of not just land but a culture — and a way of life. By […]

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Mochiko Chicken Recipe

Servings: 4Prep time: 25 minutesTotal time: 30 minutes, plus 4 hours marinating Ingredients for the fried chicken: 2 1/4 cups|250 grams cornstarch 3/4 cup|100 grams Mochiko flour 2 tablespoons granulated sugar 2 tablespoons garlic salt2 tablespoons gochujang 2 tablespoons minced ginger 2 tablespoons sake 2 tablespoons soy sauce 2 large eggs 2 cups|280 grams all-purpose […]

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Who Is Tulsi Gabbard, Really?

WASHINGTON — Is she a desperate candidate seeking attention? A potential third-party spoiler? A Russian asset? Just sincerely pissed at the DNC? Democratic Party insiders have some guesses, but really, they’re just deeply confused about Rep. Tulsi Gabbard’s latest campaign moves. In a year when several lower-tier presidential candidates seem to be confoundingly staying in […]

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Tulsi Gabbard Won’t Seek Re-Election to Congress in 2020

Representative Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii, who has remained in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination even as her bid has failed to gain much traction in polls, announced Friday that she would not seek a fifth term in Congress. The announcement was likely to fuel speculation that Ms. Gabbard may be preparing for a […]

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What, Exactly, Is Tulsi Gabbard Up To?

WASHINGTON — Stephen K. Bannon, President Trump’s former chief strategist, is impressed with her political talent. Richard B. Spencer, the white nationalist leader, says he could vote for her. Former Representative Ron Paul praises her “libertarian instincts,” while Franklin Graham, the influential evangelist, finds her “refreshing.” And far-right conspiracy theorists like Mike Cernovich sees a […]

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Steeped in Hawaiian History, Longboarding Rides an Instagram Wave

LONG BEACH, N.Y. — In the lulls between waves here on a recent weekday morning, dozens of nine-foot longboards floated like driftwood as the slate gray glass of the late-summer Atlantic dithered into cords. Yet as the waves pitched, a ballet began: With one foot flicked skyward, toes briefly arched in a pointe, Kelia Moniz […]

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This Volcanic Eruption Set Off a Phytoplankton Bloom

The eruption last year of the Kilauea volcano in Hawaii produced the equivalent of 320,000 Olympic-size swimming pools of lava. Much of it ended up flowing into the Pacific Ocean, creating plumes of acidic, glassy steam in the process. The eruption also unexpectedly coincided with an explosion in the population of phytoplankton, a diverse array […]

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Does America Care About Care? Not Enough

First of three articles. Caretaking occupies a paradoxical place in the American mind. On the one hand, we cast caretaking for babies and children as a sacred duty of the private sphere. We lionize the bonds between parents and their children in movies, songs and storybooks. We romanticize the kinds of wisdom that are passed […]

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What’s Killing California’s Sea Otters? House Cats.

For a sea otter, a bad infection with the Toxoplasma parasite may feel a bit like drowning. “The brain is no longer able to function and tell the body how to swim,” said Dr. Karen Shapiro, a veterinarian and pathologist at the University of California, Davis. The parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, enters the otter orally and […]

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Witnessing the Birth of a Crater Lake Where Lava Just Flowed

Last spring, Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano began its most destructive eruption in recorded history. On May 2, as its underlying magma supply headed to the mountain’s lower east rift zone, a lava lake within the Halema’uma’u summit crater that had been there for 10 years began to rapidly drain. A week later, this pool of molten […]

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Why Are Native Hawaiians Protesting Against a Telescope?

A last-ditch effort by Native Hawaiians to stop construction at a culturally significant site on Hawaii’s Big Island has begun to attract national attention — echoing in some ways the protests by Native Americans in 2016 and 2017 against the Dakota Access pipeline project. Here is what you need to know about the dispute in […]

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Hawaiian Elders Arrested Trying to Block Telescope Construction

Construction was set to begin this week on a giant telescope on the barren summit of Mauna Kea, a volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island, considered the best observatory site in the Northern Hemisphere. The project, however, has long drawn the opposition of those who say it would desecrate the mountain’s sacred ground. On Wednesday, that […]

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In Hawaii, Rat Lungworm Disease Infects People but Eludes Researchers

A tropical parasite transmitted through rats and snails has caught the attention of health officials in Hawaii. But few scientists have studied the infection once it makes its way into humans, and researchers can’t say for certain whether the disease is becoming more widespread. The parasite, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, typically resides in a rat’s pulmonary arteries […]

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Want to Be Less Racist? Move to Hawaii

HONOLULU — Kristin Pauker still remembers her uncle’s warning about Dartmouth. “It’s a white institution,” he said. “You’re going to feel out of place.” Dr. Pauker, who is now a psychology professor, is of mixed ancestry, her mother of Japanese descent and her father white from an Italian-Irish background. Applying to colleges, she was keen […]

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In Hawaii, Construction to Begin on Disputed Telescope Project

Governor David Ige of Hawaii announced on Thursday that a “notice to proceed” had been issued for construction of a giant, long-contested telescope on Mauna Kea, the volcano on the Big Island that 13 major telescopes already call home. Construction could start as soon as July. “We are all stewards of Mauna Kea,” Gov. Ige […]

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To Map a Coral Reef, Peel Back the Seawater

Coral reefs comprise just 1 percent of the ocean floor yet they are home to 25 percent of the world’s marine fish, a growing source of protein for people. But reefs are imperiled by a range of threats including warming waters, acidifying seas, destructive fishing methods, and agricultural and other runoff. Moreover, scientists have only […]

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