Tag: Grief and Loss

Compassion Fatigue: When Counselors and Other Helpers Don’t Make Time for Self-Care

Signs of Compassion Fatigue can include: Mood changes Exhaustion both mentally and physically Sleeping issues Feeling burnt out Irritability Unable to turn off the work mind Depression and anxiety No resources or healthy outlets for self-care Shifts in feelings towards clients (negative) Absenteeism Eleven years ago, I worked for an organization that experienced a traumatic […]

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Surviving the Holidays After Loss: Our Second Christmas Without You

If navigating a daily course is difficult following the storm of a tragic loss, charting through special occasions feels nearly impassable. What were once highly anticipated, joyous celebrations, now felt like tortuous labor. Fighting off emotions, all day for weeks leading up to the holidays, only added to the sense of dread and depression already […]

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Healing After Suicide

After suicide many survivors must deal with confusing emotions and unanswered questions by themselves, as this type of death can cause others to pull away. Whether from fear or uncertainty or a tendency to look for someone to blame, whole communities might — intentionally or unintentionally — leave individuals or families in isolation. While it […]

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Podcast | Abandoned: Loss of Friendships

(Transcript Available Below) SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW About The Not Crazy Podcast Hosts Gabe Howard is an award-winning writer and speaker who lives with bipolar disorder. He is the author of the popular book, Mental Illness is an Asshole and other Observations, available from Amazon; signed copies are also available directly from Gabe Howard. To learn […]

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Handling College After a Loss to Suicide

The mission of UWG’s Prevent Program is to prevent suicides from occurring, but it also provides an outlet for students who have been touched by suicide. One student reaches out to another who has experienced similar circumstances by enlisting him or her in various activities and outreach programs that help prevent suicide. This accomplishes an […]

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Heart-Talk: The Power of Togetherness

For many different reasons, however, a lot of people shield their hearts. They wear “masks” for the personas they put forth in front of others. Isolating the heart has become almost standard in all but the closest relationships, and sometimes those go awry and leave the needs of self, family members or friends unfulfilled. The […]

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The Benefits of Swedish Death Cleaning

Not everyone will experience it the same way, of course. But letting go of items that define a part of our identity can make room for paying attention to another part.  Facing mortality: We know we won’t live forever but sometimes it feels easier to live in denial than to face the inevitability of death. […]

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What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You — Different

Janie has a point. It’s hard for people who are in the midst of a traumatic experience or  cascade of life’s challenges to get on board with the idea that it will toughen them up. Why should they? It’s hard enough to get through the day without feeling like a failure if they don’t feel […]

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The Grief of Self-Growth and Healthy Narcissism

I didn’t know Renee well. I had been focused on learning and developing my skillset, and so I saw Renee as just another person in our group. Part of the problem was that this particular supervision group was based more on competition than support and cooperation. It supported each of our narcissisms — certainly mine. […]

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National Psychotherapy Day: Telling Our Therapy Stories

“In a society where we still hear statements like ‘only crazy people go to therapy’ or ‘you need therapy!’ as an insult, it can be easy to think that psychotherapy is a strange and mysterious endeavor for other people,” Howes said. However, when we hear personal stories from individuals of different backgrounds and circumstances—perhaps backgrounds […]

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The Resiliency of Survivors of Suicide Loss

In addition to your own sense of loss, you are forced to come up with euphemisms to describe to others what happened to your loved one. Even the most understanding of sympathizers will have difficulty concealing their shock if you mention suicide. Sometimes, it doesn’t always feel appropriate to explain your loss in full truth. […]

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Those 5 Stages of Grief: Does Mourning Really Unfold Like That?

They found that, with regard to the order in which various reactions peak over time, Kubler-Ross was spot on. She was wrong, though, about the frequency with which the bereaved experience different emotions. The most important conclusion of research on stages of grief, though, is that there is no one way to grieve. Different people […]

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Podcast: Openly Discussing Suicide in Our Communities

One of the most dangerous misconceptions about suicide is that asking a loved one if they are suicidal will increase the odds that they will attempt suicide.  Today Dr. Nate Ivers of Wake Forest University discusses the importance of making “the covert overt” by asking blunt, straightforward questions of those you suspect may be thinking […]

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Using Writing to Help Us Process Our Grief

“The pain of missing him was unbearable. The thought of living the rest of my life, years upon years, without him filled me with hopelessness and despair,” Neustadter writes in her new book Love You Like the Sky: Surviving the Suicide of a Beloved. Eight months after John died, Neustadter started sending emails to his […]

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