Tag: Globalization

The Effectiveness of the Global Financial Safety Net Depends on the Tools and Shocks

By Beatrice Scheubel, Economist, Directorate General International and European Relations, ECB, Livio Stracca, Deputy Director General International and European Relations, ECB, and Cédric Tille, Professor of Economics, Graduate Institute, Geneva and CEPR Research Fellow. Originally published at VoxEU. More than ten years on from the start of the Global Crisis, policymakers are discussing the effectiveness […]

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Embedded Internationalism: The Only Way to Fight the Global Oligarchy

Yves here This post may seen a bit abstract, but it attempts to map out how to increase democratic accountability and counter the influence powerful private sector interests have over major international institutions. While another response has been to try to bolster national sovereignity, that can’t go very far in a world where economies smaller […]

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Why China’s Current Account Balance Approaches Zero

By Michael Baltensperger, a research assistant at Bruegel who previously worked for the Economic Research and Statistics Division of the World Trade Organization and as an external collaborator for the International Labour Organization. Originally published at Bruegel China’s current account is projected to be balanced within the next few years. Observers disagree whether this is […]

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World Bank Financialization Strategy Serves Big Finance

By Jomo Kwame Sundaram, a former economics professor, was Assistant Director-General for Economic and Social Development, Food and Agriculture Organization, who received the Wassily Leontief Prize for Advancing the Frontiers of Economic Thought in 2007. and Anis Chowdhury, Adjunct Professor at Western Sydney University & University of New South Wales (Australia), who held senior United […]

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The Return of la Marine

By Hans-Georg Betz, a leading expert on populism and the radical right in affluent liberal democracies, and has written several seminal books and articles on radical right-wing populism, nativism, and Islamophobia. His academic profile can be found here. Originally published at openDemocracy There is a saying in German – Totgesagte leben länger, roughly but not quite […]

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Bill Black: Tom Friedman Just Noticed that the UK “Has Gone Mad”

Yves here. Bill Black does a systematic and well-deserved vivisection of The World According to Thomas Friedman, using his latest column as a point of departure. One of Black’s remarkable finds is that Friedman acknowledged that deregulation and globalization would make financial crises “endemic,” yet couldn’t be bothered to consider that they would impose massive […]

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Airbus and Boeing Are Signing Economic Suicide Pacts With China

By Marshall Auerback, a market analyst and commentator.Produced by Economy for All, a project of the Independent Media Institute Airbus is considering whether or not to shift the assembly process of its latest generation of A330 planes to China as part of a bid to increase its market share in the world’s fastest-growing civil aviation […]

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Brexit Delay Will Not Postpone Deglobalisation

By Peter A.G. van Bergeijk, Professor of International Economics and Macroeconomics, Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus University. Originally published at VoxEU Many associate Brexit and the Trumpian trade wars with the start of a new phase of deglobalisation. This column argues that we should view them as symptoms rather than causes, as the world had […]

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China’s Belt and Road Initiative vs Washington Consensus

Originally published by Inter Press Service With the Washington Consensus from the 1980s being challenged, President Donald Trump withdrawing the United States from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), and China pursuing its Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), most notably with its own initiatives such as the multilateral Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB), the political and economic […]

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Technology: From Copycats to Innovators

By Richard Vague, Managing Partner, Gabriel Investments and Chair, The Governor’s Woods Foundation. Originally published in Democracy; cross posted from the Institute for New Economic Thinking website In 1787, in his capacity as secretary of the Pennsylvania Society for the Encouragement of Manufactures and the Useful Arts, [Tench] Coxe had provided support for a British […]

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Report from the Ground in Paris: The Most Recent Gilets Jaunes Protests

By Lambert Strether of Corrente. Our own Colonel Smithers was in Paris for the most recent Gilets Jaunes protests (“Gilets jaunes protests cause extensive damage on Champs-Élysées“; “Macron calls for ‘strong decisions’ after violent Yellow Jacket protests“)[1] and threw a series of emails over the transom. I’m going to put extracts from the Colonel’s mail […]

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Mars or Mercury Redux: How Geopolitics Influence Bilateral Trade Agreements

By Barry Eichengreen, Professor of Economics and Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley, Arnaud Mehl, Principal Economist in the Directorate General International, European Central Ban and Livia Chiţu, Economist in the Directorate General International, European Central Bank. Originally published at VoxEU Both economics and geopolitics matter for trade agreements. In particular, defence pacts […]

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India Bans Plastics Waste Imports, While Fossil Fuel Plastics Pushers in US and China Ramp Up to Party On

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. India last week banned imports of plastics waste for recycling. This move will exacerbate the worldwide recycling crisis. Regular readers know that China in 2017 stopped importing plastics waste for recycling, diverting […]

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2018: A Banner Year for China, Other US Trade Partners, and Corporate America

By Wolf Richter, a San Francisco based executive, entrepreneur, start up specialist, and author, with extensive international work experience. Originally published at Wolf Street Exports increase economic activity as measured by GDP; and imports do the opposite, they reduce GDP though they tend to increase corporate profits — or else why would Corporate America run […]

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China Syndrome Redux: New Results on Global Labour Reallocation

Yves here. This article has a significant finding. It contends that while the shift of manufacturing jobs from the US to China did create a tremendous number of jobs in China, it did not lead to an increase in manufacturing wages. This would seem implausible until you remember that China had (and still has) hundreds […]

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